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Loert

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  1. Like
    Loert reacted to Edmilson in JWFAN Dreams   
    Actually it was invented in England, but Brazil popularized it on the 50s to the early 2000s, thanks to players like Pelé, Garrincha, Zico, Romário, Ronaldo, Ronaldinho Gaúcho, etc. But since we won the 2002 World Cup, the quality of the soccer being played here has descended to abismal levels... Just look at our match with Germany on 2014.
     
     
    I guess he probably have nightmares on which he writes great scores but then Lucas and Spielberg torn it to pieces when editing the movie. Or maybe he dreams about being chased by J.J. Abrams, who insistently asks him to write alternates for cues for his Star Wars scores and more performances of the Binary Sunset. "Come on, John, it'll make the movie more epic!"
  2. Like
    Loert got a reaction from Tydirium in A Williams hallmark: the brass combo for characters dying/falling   
    There's a case of something similar when Short Round almost falls into the river:
     
     
    It doesn't exactly follow the formula of long trumpet note + trombone interjection + noodling horns though, but at least the instruments come in the same order...
     
    Also, may be a bit random but those descending horns in the TPM excerpt are curiously reminiscent of the horns here from Schoenberg's Erwartung...(note the three long notes at the bottom)
     
     
  3. Like
    Loert got a reaction from carlborg in A Williams hallmark: the brass combo for characters dying/falling   
    There's a case of something similar when Short Round almost falls into the river:
     
     
    It doesn't exactly follow the formula of long trumpet note + trombone interjection + noodling horns though, but at least the instruments come in the same order...
     
    Also, may be a bit random but those descending horns in the TPM excerpt are curiously reminiscent of the horns here from Schoenberg's Erwartung...(note the three long notes at the bottom)
     
     
  4. Like
    Loert got a reaction from A Ghost From Highwood in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    I think this whole thing is a bit misleading - it could be that this is Williams, but what you actually hear in the background is a section from a cue looped three times. If that's the case then there's no real way of knowing what the "real" rhythm is.
     
    However, if it isn't looped, then there's nothing actually that "complex" about the rhythm. The accents suggest 3+3+3+3+2+2, but this adds up to 16, so there's nothing irregular about it. The whole thing is in 4/4 - as The Five Tones hinted, it's like a slowed down version of Zimmer's Mombasa.
    The Grievous excerpt has constantly changing meters - if you try tapping a regular beat to it (3/4 or 4/4), you can't do it very well. The same goes for The Falcon, the beginning of which is 2+2+2+2+3=11 so you can't fit it into 3/4 or 4/4. Similarly, this track by Jerry Goldsmith is 4/4+7/8. THESE are irregular patterns, but not the pattern in this TV spot, which is just 4/4 with some syncopation.
    Another way to think about it is that if you imagine someone conducting, they would have to keep changing their motions in the excerpts I listed in the paragraph above, but this wouldn't be the case for Mombasa nor this TV spot.
     
    Just wanted to highlight that there's nothing really linking Williams' past use of irregular meters (i.e. in his action music) with the rhythm in this TV spot.
  5. Like
    Loert got a reaction from A Ghost From Highwood in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    This sounds more like it was written by someone who has just discovered that the diminished 7th chord is a thing and decided to use it everywhere.
    I think the music in that advert with the Falcon/hyperdrive is more likely to be by Williams than this.
  6. Like
    Loert got a reaction from The Illustrious Jerry in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    I think this whole thing is a bit misleading - it could be that this is Williams, but what you actually hear in the background is a section from a cue looped three times. If that's the case then there's no real way of knowing what the "real" rhythm is.
     
    However, if it isn't looped, then there's nothing actually that "complex" about the rhythm. The accents suggest 3+3+3+3+2+2, but this adds up to 16, so there's nothing irregular about it. The whole thing is in 4/4 - as The Five Tones hinted, it's like a slowed down version of Zimmer's Mombasa.
    The Grievous excerpt has constantly changing meters - if you try tapping a regular beat to it (3/4 or 4/4), you can't do it very well. The same goes for The Falcon, the beginning of which is 2+2+2+2+3=11 so you can't fit it into 3/4 or 4/4. Similarly, this track by Jerry Goldsmith is 4/4+7/8. THESE are irregular patterns, but not the pattern in this TV spot, which is just 4/4 with some syncopation.
    Another way to think about it is that if you imagine someone conducting, they would have to keep changing their motions in the excerpts I listed in the paragraph above, but this wouldn't be the case for Mombasa nor this TV spot.
     
    Just wanted to highlight that there's nothing really linking Williams' past use of irregular meters (i.e. in his action music) with the rhythm in this TV spot.
  7. Thanks
    Loert got a reaction from Will in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    I think this whole thing is a bit misleading - it could be that this is Williams, but what you actually hear in the background is a section from a cue looped three times. If that's the case then there's no real way of knowing what the "real" rhythm is.
     
    However, if it isn't looped, then there's nothing actually that "complex" about the rhythm. The accents suggest 3+3+3+3+2+2, but this adds up to 16, so there's nothing irregular about it. The whole thing is in 4/4 - as The Five Tones hinted, it's like a slowed down version of Zimmer's Mombasa.
    The Grievous excerpt has constantly changing meters - if you try tapping a regular beat to it (3/4 or 4/4), you can't do it very well. The same goes for The Falcon, the beginning of which is 2+2+2+2+3=11 so you can't fit it into 3/4 or 4/4. Similarly, this track by Jerry Goldsmith is 4/4+7/8. THESE are irregular patterns, but not the pattern in this TV spot, which is just 4/4 with some syncopation.
    Another way to think about it is that if you imagine someone conducting, they would have to keep changing their motions in the excerpts I listed in the paragraph above, but this wouldn't be the case for Mombasa nor this TV spot.
     
    Just wanted to highlight that there's nothing really linking Williams' past use of irregular meters (i.e. in his action music) with the rhythm in this TV spot.
  8. Like
    Loert got a reaction from Taikomochi in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    I think this whole thing is a bit misleading - it could be that this is Williams, but what you actually hear in the background is a section from a cue looped three times. If that's the case then there's no real way of knowing what the "real" rhythm is.
     
    However, if it isn't looped, then there's nothing actually that "complex" about the rhythm. The accents suggest 3+3+3+3+2+2, but this adds up to 16, so there's nothing irregular about it. The whole thing is in 4/4 - as The Five Tones hinted, it's like a slowed down version of Zimmer's Mombasa.
    The Grievous excerpt has constantly changing meters - if you try tapping a regular beat to it (3/4 or 4/4), you can't do it very well. The same goes for The Falcon, the beginning of which is 2+2+2+2+3=11 so you can't fit it into 3/4 or 4/4. Similarly, this track by Jerry Goldsmith is 4/4+7/8. THESE are irregular patterns, but not the pattern in this TV spot, which is just 4/4 with some syncopation.
    Another way to think about it is that if you imagine someone conducting, they would have to keep changing their motions in the excerpts I listed in the paragraph above, but this wouldn't be the case for Mombasa nor this TV spot.
     
    Just wanted to highlight that there's nothing really linking Williams' past use of irregular meters (i.e. in his action music) with the rhythm in this TV spot.
  9. Thanks
    Loert got a reaction from The Five Tones in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    I think this whole thing is a bit misleading - it could be that this is Williams, but what you actually hear in the background is a section from a cue looped three times. If that's the case then there's no real way of knowing what the "real" rhythm is.
     
    However, if it isn't looped, then there's nothing actually that "complex" about the rhythm. The accents suggest 3+3+3+3+2+2, but this adds up to 16, so there's nothing irregular about it. The whole thing is in 4/4 - as The Five Tones hinted, it's like a slowed down version of Zimmer's Mombasa.
    The Grievous excerpt has constantly changing meters - if you try tapping a regular beat to it (3/4 or 4/4), you can't do it very well. The same goes for The Falcon, the beginning of which is 2+2+2+2+3=11 so you can't fit it into 3/4 or 4/4. Similarly, this track by Jerry Goldsmith is 4/4+7/8. THESE are irregular patterns, but not the pattern in this TV spot, which is just 4/4 with some syncopation.
    Another way to think about it is that if you imagine someone conducting, they would have to keep changing their motions in the excerpts I listed in the paragraph above, but this wouldn't be the case for Mombasa nor this TV spot.
     
    Just wanted to highlight that there's nothing really linking Williams' past use of irregular meters (i.e. in his action music) with the rhythm in this TV spot.
  10. Like
    Loert got a reaction from The Five Tones in 7th on the bottom?   
    Well it's certainly a major 7th above the root. The chord itself is the minor major seventh chord, the version with the 7th in the bottom is the same chord, 3rd inversion.
     
  11. Like
    Loert got a reaction from Docteur Qui in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    I think this whole thing is a bit misleading - it could be that this is Williams, but what you actually hear in the background is a section from a cue looped three times. If that's the case then there's no real way of knowing what the "real" rhythm is.
     
    However, if it isn't looped, then there's nothing actually that "complex" about the rhythm. The accents suggest 3+3+3+3+2+2, but this adds up to 16, so there's nothing irregular about it. The whole thing is in 4/4 - as The Five Tones hinted, it's like a slowed down version of Zimmer's Mombasa.
    The Grievous excerpt has constantly changing meters - if you try tapping a regular beat to it (3/4 or 4/4), you can't do it very well. The same goes for The Falcon, the beginning of which is 2+2+2+2+3=11 so you can't fit it into 3/4 or 4/4. Similarly, this track by Jerry Goldsmith is 4/4+7/8. THESE are irregular patterns, but not the pattern in this TV spot, which is just 4/4 with some syncopation.
    Another way to think about it is that if you imagine someone conducting, they would have to keep changing their motions in the excerpts I listed in the paragraph above, but this wouldn't be the case for Mombasa nor this TV spot.
     
    Just wanted to highlight that there's nothing really linking Williams' past use of irregular meters (i.e. in his action music) with the rhythm in this TV spot.
  12. Like
    Loert got a reaction from Remco in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    I think this whole thing is a bit misleading - it could be that this is Williams, but what you actually hear in the background is a section from a cue looped three times. If that's the case then there's no real way of knowing what the "real" rhythm is.
     
    However, if it isn't looped, then there's nothing actually that "complex" about the rhythm. The accents suggest 3+3+3+3+2+2, but this adds up to 16, so there's nothing irregular about it. The whole thing is in 4/4 - as The Five Tones hinted, it's like a slowed down version of Zimmer's Mombasa.
    The Grievous excerpt has constantly changing meters - if you try tapping a regular beat to it (3/4 or 4/4), you can't do it very well. The same goes for The Falcon, the beginning of which is 2+2+2+2+3=11 so you can't fit it into 3/4 or 4/4. Similarly, this track by Jerry Goldsmith is 4/4+7/8. THESE are irregular patterns, but not the pattern in this TV spot, which is just 4/4 with some syncopation.
    Another way to think about it is that if you imagine someone conducting, they would have to keep changing their motions in the excerpts I listed in the paragraph above, but this wouldn't be the case for Mombasa nor this TV spot.
     
    Just wanted to highlight that there's nothing really linking Williams' past use of irregular meters (i.e. in his action music) with the rhythm in this TV spot.
  13. Like
    Loert got a reaction from Disco Stu in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    I think this whole thing is a bit misleading - it could be that this is Williams, but what you actually hear in the background is a section from a cue looped three times. If that's the case then there's no real way of knowing what the "real" rhythm is.
     
    However, if it isn't looped, then there's nothing actually that "complex" about the rhythm. The accents suggest 3+3+3+3+2+2, but this adds up to 16, so there's nothing irregular about it. The whole thing is in 4/4 - as The Five Tones hinted, it's like a slowed down version of Zimmer's Mombasa.
    The Grievous excerpt has constantly changing meters - if you try tapping a regular beat to it (3/4 or 4/4), you can't do it very well. The same goes for The Falcon, the beginning of which is 2+2+2+2+3=11 so you can't fit it into 3/4 or 4/4. Similarly, this track by Jerry Goldsmith is 4/4+7/8. THESE are irregular patterns, but not the pattern in this TV spot, which is just 4/4 with some syncopation.
    Another way to think about it is that if you imagine someone conducting, they would have to keep changing their motions in the excerpts I listed in the paragraph above, but this wouldn't be the case for Mombasa nor this TV spot.
     
    Just wanted to highlight that there's nothing really linking Williams' past use of irregular meters (i.e. in his action music) with the rhythm in this TV spot.
  14. Like
    Loert got a reaction from First TROS March Accolyte in What is the last piece of classical music you listened to?   
    Like him or hate him, there will likely never be another like him.
     
     
  15. Haha
    Loert reacted to Not Mr. Big in Poll: The Rise of Skywalker End Suite predictions   
    I made a concept for how the Rise of Skywalker ending might sound.  
     
  16. Thanks
    Loert got a reaction from First TROS March Accolyte in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    I think this whole thing is a bit misleading - it could be that this is Williams, but what you actually hear in the background is a section from a cue looped three times. If that's the case then there's no real way of knowing what the "real" rhythm is.
     
    However, if it isn't looped, then there's nothing actually that "complex" about the rhythm. The accents suggest 3+3+3+3+2+2, but this adds up to 16, so there's nothing irregular about it. The whole thing is in 4/4 - as The Five Tones hinted, it's like a slowed down version of Zimmer's Mombasa.
    The Grievous excerpt has constantly changing meters - if you try tapping a regular beat to it (3/4 or 4/4), you can't do it very well. The same goes for The Falcon, the beginning of which is 2+2+2+2+3=11 so you can't fit it into 3/4 or 4/4. Similarly, this track by Jerry Goldsmith is 4/4+7/8. THESE are irregular patterns, but not the pattern in this TV spot, which is just 4/4 with some syncopation.
    Another way to think about it is that if you imagine someone conducting, they would have to keep changing their motions in the excerpts I listed in the paragraph above, but this wouldn't be the case for Mombasa nor this TV spot.
     
    Just wanted to highlight that there's nothing really linking Williams' past use of irregular meters (i.e. in his action music) with the rhythm in this TV spot.
  17. Like
    Loert reacted to The Five Tones in 7th on the bottom?   
    Cmin over* B natural

    *and under the B natural in the high tremolo strings
  18. Like
    Loert reacted to The Five Tones in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    None of those pieces use the pattern I spelled out above, and Falstaff transcribed. Rhythm is a Williams specialty, but he has his signatures and this ain't one of 'em. Totally prepared to be wrong... edit: and wronger than just, JW wrote a rhythm that modulates as it does in Grievous and some producer looped it into static Zimmer "Mombasa" 4/4.
  19. Like
    Loert got a reaction from Once in Official JWFan mock ups and fan-made recordings thread!   
    Here's my mockup of JW's arrangement of "Anything Goes", from the opening sequence of Temple of Doom; always wanted to hear what was going on behind all that tap dancing!
     
     
    Enjoy!
  20. Like
    Loert reacted to Jay in David Arnold's STARGATE - NEW! 2019 2CD La-la Land Records edition NOW AVAILABLE   
    https://www.facebook.com/lalalandrecords/posts/10158203165013755
  21. Like
    Loert reacted to The Five Tones in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    Just not chromatic enough and/or modulating enough, see the BB-8 TFA teaser or TROS They Fly Now clip. Not enough complexity, subtle or otherwise.
  22. Like
    Loert got a reaction from Taikomochi in New Star Wars: TROS TV Spot - Likely Williams   
    This sounds more like it was written by someone who has just discovered that the diminished 7th chord is a thing and decided to use it everywhere.
    I think the music in that advert with the Falcon/hyperdrive is more likely to be by Williams than this.
  23. Like
    Loert got a reaction from Marian Schedenig in The Classical Music Recommendation Thread   
    The Sawallisch studio recording is still my favourite and still the one to beat, IMO. It is one of the best-mixed opera albums out there. My only issue with it is that the four tam-tams in the penultimate scene aren't brought out as well as in some other recordings (especially the Bohm).
     
    As for Tannhauser...my favourite is Sawallisch, again. 1962 live recording. Though I can't say I've listened to all the recordings out there and done an exact comparison!
  24. Like
    Loert got a reaction from A Ghost From Highwood in Indiana Doug and the Temple of Doug   
    I think I can make out some of the text on the left:
     
    "...for instance, if we take the opening of Willie's theme and combine it with the middle section of the Raider's March, the gaps between the notes get smaller with time, symbolising how Indiana and Willie start off hating each other before gradually becoming intertwined in a relationship as Willie wins over the heart of Indiana (which, of course, is the antithesis of Mola Ram trying to rip out the heart of Indiana by force in the bridge sequence)..."
  25. Like
    Loert got a reaction from Boom Tss in Official JWFan mock ups and fan-made recordings thread!   
    Here's my mockup of JW's arrangement of "Anything Goes", from the opening sequence of Temple of Doom; always wanted to hear what was going on behind all that tap dancing!
     
     
    Enjoy!
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