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Hans Zimmer's DUNKIRK


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1 minute ago, Stefancos said:

But when have you ever been blown away visually? 

Even Interstellar was lacking that a bit for me.

 

Whoa.  This was 80% of what Interstellar had going for it for me.

 

I still think about that space station orbiting Saturn at the end.  Breathtaking.

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This approach to wanting films to be almost ascetic in their storytelling, or that those kind of films are somehow "purer," is such horse crap to me.  These are tricks that storytellers have been usin

This thread  

58 minutes ago, Disco Stu said:

 

Whoa.  This was 80% of what Interstellar had going for it for me.

 

I still think about that space station orbiting Saturn at the end.  Breathtaking.

 

Again, I liked Interstellar, but I'd call it visually functional. It's very 'matter of fact' cinematography, like Dunkirk is actually. That's fine, but I don't find the style particularly peculiar or arresting.

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On 31/7/2017 at 1:03 AM, crocodile said:

From my observations, yes, British keep their cool for a long time. But a lot of it is just a facade. It seems to be expected of them and they are good at that. But when they break...mate, it's just spectacular. Meltdown to end all meltdowns.

 

On the other side of the pond, we Poles don't have spectacular meltdowns. And what is the secret, might you ask? We're always retain a healthy dose of misery.

 

Karol

 

You're Polish? English isn't your first language?

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4 hours ago, Bilbo Skywalker said:

Genuinely thought the guy was English! 

No. My name would be the first clue. ;)

 

4 hours ago, Stefancos said:

You'll be right soon enough I expect. ;)

I was thinking of applying before the end of this year. It's costly so we'll see.

 

Karol

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According to the official YouTube soundtrack upload, The Mole, The Tide, and Regimental Brothers all include the Elgar theme. 

 

Can anyone tell me where the reference is, for example, in The Mole? It must be pretty sly. 

 

 

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3 hours ago, Stefancos said:

Look, my postcount is the greatest. I know about posting here. I will make sure my posts in the Nolan threads are more numerous than anyone else's!

But out of the 111,096 posts you've made, only 4,736 have a favorable rating.  That means only 4% of what you say is valuable with the rest being hot air.  TGP has 15%, and I have 39% so I am the god of this thread.

2 hours ago, Will said:

One of the little touches I really love about Wallfisch's Elgar arrangement is the super Zimmer-y (synth?) horn here:

 

 

Very Vangelis, not Zimmer.

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1 hour ago, Will said:

Can anyone tell me where the reference is, for example, in The Mole? It must be pretty sly. 

 

If you listen from here:

 

 

...you can hear the Nimrod theme being played in very slow motion in the strings/synths/whatever.

 

It's supposed to be a subliminal effect, the listener probably wouldn't notice it if they weren't actively looking for it.  

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9 minutes ago, Loert said:

 

If you listen from here:

 

 

...you can hear the Nimrod theme being played in very slow motion in the strings/synths/whatever.

 

It's supposed to be a subliminal effect, the listener probably wouldn't notice it if they weren't actively looking for it.  

 

Well it is a direct quote.  Not that sly.  Is this cue by Zimmer or whatshisname?

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4 hours ago, Stefancos said:

His films are usually fine on a shot to shot level. But there's something about the way their joined up that bugs me. First noticed it with The Dark Knight. 

 

It's Lee Smith's editing, and I first put my finger on it watching Spectre. He ruins dramatic rhythms through over-cutting.

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Saw this Friday - honestly would say it's the most visceral film I've ever experienced. Kind of felt like I'd been punched in the gut afterward!

 

I agree with this review 100%: http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/450001/dunkirk-horror-movie 

 

I don't have the right words to describe seeing this film...not having personally fought in war, I can't even begin to fathom what that's truly like, but I feel this movie gives a glimpse. Certainly tough to get through at times - in the best, most necessary way.

 

For me, it's probably going to go in the pile of: War Horse, Schindler's List, The Book Thief to some extent - what these have in common is, I've only seen them once (well, maybe twice), because they just tear at me too much to actively want to see them again. High praise - indeed, but Dunkirk has some shortcomings, already mentioned by others in the thread.

 

Did go to the biggest nicest IMAX in town (not 70 mm sadly), seen so many films here, I know the theater's characteristics well - previously the loudest film I've seen here was probably Interstellar (though it was more of an awestruck overwhelming wow in that case.)

 

This time..was far different. Dunkirk made anything else I ever thought was loud totally PALE in comparison. Actually had to cover my ears a few times, incredibly uncomfortable - could feel every shot ring out through the body, chair vibrating wildly through large swathes of the movie. Found myself wondering if the real Dunkirk battles were even that loud actually - if so, then fair enough! But I did feel like this theater had everything set on 11!

 

Tell me - how was the sound level for all the rest of you who saw this, compared to say, Interstellar or other movies? Was it ridiculously loud?

 

Two couples even walked out, one after only ten minutes, the other about halfway through....both were older, of an age that I wondered if they could possibly be veterans. I can absolutely see how it would just be too much.

 

The scene inside the small ship with the shots being fired was the most difficult for me, yet I couldn't look away...omg, just so intense. 

 

The score: It was pretty interesting to hear that cue "The Mole" above because I simply couldn't hear much of it in the movie - the first time I remember noticing the time-dilated Nimrod was when the fleet of small boats was coming in. I did like how that scene was scored, one of only a few musical moments that really stood out. 

 

Did anyone see this? About his use of the "Shepard tone":

 

 

The score did add much to the tense atmosphere, but a lot of it seems to be grand sound design/effects - and usually either obscured by how loud the rest of the movie is, or rearing up as overkill in certain scenes.

 

On 7/30/2017 at 11:10 AM, Stefancos said:

Zimmer's score was effective in setting both the rhythm and tone. But that's really it. In the film compared to his last project with Nolan this is a huge step down.

Also, and this is a personal opinion, throbbing synths and ambient textures in a period war film is a mistake.The music stood out from the other wise brilliantly authentic aesthetics of the movie. 

 

Do agree with this - I so wish it hadn't been mostly synth, it just doesn't fit well with this particular film. I find myself suddenly remembering Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World which I really adore, of course it was tracked with mostly classical music - I wouldn't be sad if Dunkirk had similar treatment. Why not just play the actual Nimrod and be done with it? Would have been incredible!

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7 hours ago, Saxbabe said:

This time..was far different. Dunkirk made anything else I ever thought was loud totally PALE in comparison. Actually had to cover my ears a few times, incredibly uncomfortable - could feel every shot ring out through the body, chair vibrating wildly through large swathes of the movie. Found myself wondering if the real Dunkirk battles were even that loud actually - if so, then fair enough! But I did feel like this theater had everything set on 11!

 

Tell me - how was the sound level for all the rest of you who saw this, compared to say, Interstellar or other movies? Was it ridiculously loud?

 

I saw a documentary short on youtube where veterans of Dunkirk saw the movie and they actually commented it felt very authentic EXCEPT was way louder than the actual event. hahaha.  Yeah, Nolan needs to get his hearing checked between having his sound at 11 or having dialogue mumbled underneath loud sound and music. 

 

It was very loud for me at my theater and I had to cover my ear a few times but I have come to expect that with modern movies like this. 

 

Good thought about having Nimrod played straight without it being quoted straight with synthy brass rather than alluded to.

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LOUDER! MORE INTENSE!

 

1 minute ago, Koray Savas said:

My theater wasn't loud at all. 

 

Or maybe you've finally become deaf. Remember that post of yours a while back?

 

On 24/02/2011 at 6:47 PM, Koray Savas said:

I think I need to stop listening to music. movies, etc. so loud. I'm starting to hear a very quiet ringing when I go to bed.

 

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Luckily I'm in a small town for the summer and the theater had a fairly small screen and not-very-loud volume. Of course, that also may have been a major reason why I can't quite understand why critics loved this as much as they did! 

 

But it's just a general trend nowadays -- I saw Jurassic World in 3D a while back at a good-sized theater and the decibel level was borderline painful. We actually went over to the theater manager during the previews and asked if they could tone it down, but I don't think they did. 

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It wasn't too loud in IMAX 2D in Hong Kong. The first time I was in a cinema here. 

 

The loudest movie I've ever experienced was Mad Max Fury Road in Dolby Atmos. The atmos mix is almost always too loud. 

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The 'clash' you mentioned wasn't an issue for me, I appreciated the stylistic contrast of the era and the basic musical design. No, it was the sheer bulling of its application which got on my nerves, it was relentless in its mission to manipulate my response to what was unfolding on-screen but it completely backfired.

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