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Intrada: Can we release expanded SW scores? Disney: No, we will do that ourselves. Intrada: That means they will get a release? Disney: No.

Gosh I hope Willow is in the works, and coming soon!

Really? IMHO that score is terrible in either form once you get past the main titles.  Could be my disdain for the movie itself tainting the soundtrack. 

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Next week, Intrada Records will be re-releasing their classic recording of IVANHOE, with Bruce Broughton conducting the City of London Sinfonia. The audio has been remixed and remastered from the original multi-track masters, the artwork has been updated to match Intrada's current style, and Douglass Fake has added a Tech Talk for the booklet. He has also added about ten seconds of additional drumming to one of the tracks. But most exciting of all is the news that the audio will be available for the first time in high-res format, available from various download retailers. If you have the equipment to do them justice, these high-res files may well be worth the upgrade. Don't wait if you want to buy the physical CD -- it is a limited run available only for 45 days or until the supply is exhausted.

 

https://www.tapatalk.com/groups/miklosrozsa/ivanhoe-redux-t1980.html?sid=e3f74d9025494729d0c35e0901bde42d

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6 minutes ago, Edmilson said:

How much music is missing from the Field of Dreams OST? I had the impression that it was pretty much complete.

 

About 10 minutes, apparently: https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=110590

 

Roger Feigelson at Intrada posted this one highlight cue in his "That Unreleased Cue" thread:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/06li3ffcpvmbp0h/Number 7.mp3?dl=0

 

Yavar

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40 minutes ago, Edmilson said:

How much music is missing from the Field of Dreams OST? I had the impression that it was pretty much complete.

Well, I never picked up the ost so if they do a SINGLE disc edition , I might be down for it.😊

32 minutes ago, Yavar Moradi said:

 

About 10 minutes, apparently: https://www.filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=110590

 

Roger Feigelson at Intrada posted this one highlight cue in his "That Unreleased Cue" thread:
https://www.dropbox.com/s/06li3ffcpvmbp0h/Number 7.mp3?dl=0

 

Yavar

Thanks Yavar.

It appears all the unreleased cues are extremly Short.

If they do this , it must be single disc; no OST. I can pick up the ost for five bucks IF I want the curated program

 

 

I called it!

That clip is James Earl Jones from FOD.

 

Take that Schiffy! 😆

Never doubt the prophecies of Bruce Marshall aka THE PONER*

The Poner knows.

 

 

 

* Predictor Of New and Expanded Releases.

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I think there's a quite a bit of unreleased music in it, though. Off the top of my head, I remember a sweeping renditon of the Tibet/Dalai Lama theme when Harrer first reaches Tibet. And being such a soloist centered score, there might be significant alternates

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10 minutes ago, publicist said:

Like The Last Castle it's one of those desperation releases. There's hardly anything else left.


The Last Castle was missing like two fifths of the score. Unless you're saying the score itself is some bottom of the barrel shit musically, which seems harsh to say the least. We played almost entirely unreleased music in this half hour podcast, and it's all excellent stuff IMO:
https://goldsmithodyssey.buzzsprout.com/159614/6119113-odyssey-soundtrack-spotlight-the-last-castle-2001

spotlight_the_last_castle.jpg
 

And it's also not bottom of the barrel stuff for Doug Fake. He called it "rich and rewarding" back in 2001 when it came out -- see his Doug's Corner post on this archive page: http://www.intrada.net/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?f=9&t=69

 

What's not to like, exactly?


Yavar

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19 minutes ago, Jurassic Shark said:

Well, "rich and rewarding" is typical PR talk.

 

Those old Doug's Corners are not PR fluff, and this wasn't an Intrada album at the time. Read his whole post from 2001:

 

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First, a word of caution. When playing this album, remember RAMBO III came and went some time ago.

Cryptic? Okay, I'll explain.

THE LAST CASTLE is a strong score, but Jerry Goldsmith wrote his primary melodic idea several years ago. In fact, it was originally the motif that accompanied Rambo into Afghanistan on his third trip to the big screen.

It's hard to ignore this. Goldsmith harmonizes it with fourths and fifths, as in Rambo III. He plays it on trumpet and French horn, also like Rambo III. At least the setting in THE LAST CASTLE is peacetime.

Well, sort of.

The movie opened just days after September 11, 2001. The original marketing campaign of an upside American flag was jettisoned in favor of head shots and helicopters. It didn't matter. People had a war to follow. A movie about flags just didn't matter right now.

Too bad. They missed an okay movie, terrific performance, solid score.

Actually, part of the problem may have been the movie itself. Robert Redford is a tarnished general now serving time in "The Last Castle". Fallen hero, that kind of thing. He crosses paths with mean James Gandolfini (the "warden"), mingles with prisoners, incites the inevitable riot.

Gandolfini isn't really bad enough to despise. Guards are mostly soldiers doing their duty, prisoners are so decent you forget they're guilty of anything. Something seems out of whack.

There's a great flag scene, however.

Maybe in another time.

Interestingly, the movie can be seen as something of a game. Chess. The title refers to a locale, a building. It also refers to an important chess move. The game even plays a part in the movie. Ultimately, Redford sends in his pawns, knights, bishops to do battle with Gandolfini's team. Checkmate for real.

Jerry Goldsmith saw more here. Inspired playing by Robert Redford, expressive shots of the flag, courage, heroes, the military. Stuff he draws from like no other composer in movies.

His main theme features trumpet. It's been his solo instrument of choice in military movies for decades. All three Rambo movies contain lengthy trumpet solos. IN HARM'S WAY has some strong ones, ditto MacARTHUR, THE WIND AND THE LION, CAPRICORN ONE, A GATHERING OF EAGLES, many others. For THE LAST CASTLE, trumpet player Malcolm McNab even receives credit on screen. His sound is warm, emotional. Note worthy. (Sorry, couldn't resist.)

The main theme ("The Castle") plays in C minor. Basses are firm, harmonies are sparse. Nothing gets in the way. It's all about trumpet. No other instrument better taps into the feel of heroic figures standing alone. The main idea is a triadic figure outlining a minor chord. Extensions of the idea raise the emotional level, but it all keeps returning back to basics. The triadic figure. Goldsmith adds strings, French horn, snare drum, but nothing big nor demanding. Solitary mood prevails.

"Irwin Arrives" follows a similar path. Redford arrives, the chess pieces are assembled.

A high point in the drama occurs with Gandolfini punishing Redford, requiring him to carry large rocks. It's designed to break his spirit. Since it's Robert Redford this doesn't happen. The fallen hero moves the rocks, lifts them, stacks them. He also gains respect from the other prisoners. The game is underway.

Goldsmith follows all this activity but places his emphasis on the primary motif. While acknowledging there is action, Goldsmith chooses to focus on the fallen general now rising upwards. The tone starts in solemn manner, grows in intensity, finally emerges triumphant. A turning point in the story, Goldsmith mirrors it with a bold new idea, first in low brass, then upper brass.

Most of the full-blooded action occurs late in the movie. The riot. Goldsmith sets the stage for clashing forces with "The Count Down". Bursts of rhythmic activity in French horn, percussion give way eventually to strong quotes of the primary triadic figure. No longer suppressed nor solitary, the idea moves through brass over pounding rhythms. Ascending triad-like arpeggios in trumpets color the excitement. Everything moves directly into "Hold Them", at which point Goldsmith makes clear the original solitary motif has grown in stature, size.

In the strongest visual moment on screen, Gandolfini stares down at the battle. Close-up of glasses, determined looks. The challenge is on. Goldsmith mirrors the idea with relish during "Taking Command". With a virtuoso double-tonguing figure in French horn and trumpet, armies charge. The primary motif jockeys with a jagged, open fifth motif in low brass. Percussion pound. It's total war.

Without spoiling the finish, suffice there's a flag. The stars and stripes, the red, white and blue. Goldsmith tips his hat, calls the cue "The Flag". Amidst some suspense, he corrals his main material. Harmonies now grow in weight. The main triadic idea returns on trumpet. This time however, orchestra joins in, everything crescendos. At the climactic moment, with a crash of cymbals, the music peaks in splendid manner. Interestingly, at the height of this climax, Goldsmith draws not from his main theme but rather the ascending arpeggios from earlier action music. Here the idea becomes a stirring motif for unison French horns cutting through the entire orchestra.

Goldsmith closes the score with a reprise of his main theme in full, calling it "September 11, 2001".

Make sure you stop the disc here. A "work song" of sorts by Dean Hall otherwise shatters the mood.

An odd note regarding audio. Bruce Botnick recorded, mixed, mastered. He possibly boo-booed. Snippets of flutter seem to plague horn, trumpet spots. Anomalies occur, as with the similarly tainted mastering of THE EDGE.

Flaws aside, the score is rich and rewarding.

Music for heroes.

 

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The old album is more than sufficient for the musical content on display, even if a rabid fan naturally will never agree with such statement., Missing 50 second cues and very light variations on material already released (plus a cue not by Goldsmith that gets too much credit for just being long) are not good reasons to re-release such a muted affair. I bought it just because of Covid-vibes.

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