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http://www.quartetrecords.com/the-bride-wore-black.html   Re-recording of an intriguing late Herrmann thriller. 

I received my copy of The Italian Job yesterday, less than three days after ordering.  Quartet Records certainly gotta bloomin' move on, didn't they?

One more Williams would be great. And no astronomic shipping fees for me! 😛

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NEW RELEASES
FEBRUARY 16, 2018

Available for order at
www.quartetrecords.com
 
QUARTET RECORDS ANNOUNCES MUSIC FROM FOUR CLASSIC,
AWARD-WINNING FILMS!
THE SILENCE OF THE LAMBS
(EXPANDED)
Music by Howard Shore
Limited edition of 1000 units


Retail Price: 16.95€
PRE-ORDER

Availability date 2/23/2018
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Quartet Records, MGM and Universal Music Group present the remastered, expanded release of the iconic score by Howard Shore (The Lord of the Rings, Ed Wood, Naked Lunch, Eastern Promises, The Aviator) for the classic thriller masterpiece The Silence of the Lambs.

Directed by Jonathan Demme, starring Jodie Foster, Anthony Hopkins and Scott Glenn, the film was a great success, immediately loved by critics and audiences. It won five Oscars, including Best Picture, Director, Screenplay and acting awards for Foster and Hopkins.
 
Howard Shore was no stranger to either the horror or thriller genre when he worked on The Silence of the Lambs—he had started his career working with director David Cronenberg on a series of disturbing films such as The Brood, Scanners, Videodrome and The Fly. The music doesn’t sound like something from a horror movie or a thriller—it is operatic, dark, and very beautiful.
 
MCA released a generous 50-minute album in 1991, but some key cues were omitted. We are now proud to present this expanded edition—including the complete score plus alternates—produced by Neil S. Bulk, supervised by Mr. Shore himself, and mastered by Doug Schwartz from the original two-track stereo session tapes, courtesy of MGM.  Featuring a performance by the Munich Symphony Orchestra under the baton of the composer, this special release is limited to 1000 units and features exclusive, in-depth liner notes by writer Jeff Bond.
PLATOON
(EXPANDED)
Music by Georges Delerue
Limited edition of 1000 units

Retail Price: 16.95€
PRE-ORDER

Availability date 2/23/2018
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Quartet Records and MGM present the expanded, ultimate CD release of the precious, deeply emotional score by Georges Delerue (Day For Night; Women in Love; Man, Woman and Child, Agnes of God) for Oliver Stone’s iconic Vietnam War movie Platoon.
 
This raw but sensitive vision of war and innocence was awarded four Oscars in 1987, including Best Picture and Best Director, and was the springboard for many young actors who were just beginning their careers and became some of the brightest stars of their generation: Tom Berenger, Willem Dafoe, Charlie Sheen, Johnny Depp and Forest Whitaker, among others.
 
Director and composer had already worked together on the excellent Salvador one year before, and here they repeated their collaboration. Stone wanted from Delerue a bittersweet sound that would contrast with the terrible images of death and chaos; he had used the famous "Adagio for Strings" by Samuel Barber as a temp-track. Delerue wrote a radical, beautiful score modelled on and inspired by the Barber, but in the end, Stone decided not to use a large part of it, using instead the Barber, adapted and conducted by Delerue.
 
The album released in 1987 was a compilation of songs from the period, with a couple of short cues by Delerue and his adaptation of the “Adagio” that included sound effects and dialogue. Some years later, the Prometheus label released a CD containing the short Salvador score and a 25-minute selection from Platoon. Now we are proud to present Delerue’s score, recorded with the Vancouver Symphony Orchestra, in its entirety, including unused cues, alternates and album versions. Produced by Neil S. Bulk and mastered by Doug Schwartz from the original two-track stereo session tapes (courtesy of MGM), this special release is limited to 1000 units and features exclusive, in-depth liner notes by writer Tim Greiving, who discusses both film and score and incorporates several interesting quotes from Oliver Stone.
AMARCORD
(EXPANDED)
Music by Nino Rota
Limited edition of 2000 units

Retail Price: 20.95€
PRE-ORDER

Availability date 2/23/2018
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Quartet Records and  Gruppo Sugar present a mammoth 2-CD set presenting for the first time ever the famous original score by Nino Rota (The Leopard, La Dolce Vita, Otto e Mezzo, Romeo & Juliet) for Federico Fellini’s masterpiece Amarcord, awarded the Oscar for Best Foreign Film in 1973, and also nominated for Best Director and Best Original Screenplay.

Often hailed as Federico Fellini’s most personal movie despite the director’s vehement denial, Amarcord is arguably one of his most beloved “confessions.” Telling the story of life in Rimini from winter to autumn, Amarcord presents Fellini’s own recollections of his upbringing in an Italian town. The episodic story focuses on a mischievous boy named Titta who, in typical Fellini fashion, lusts after big-breasted women, tries to woo the town's most beautiful girl and find his place in Fascist Italy—all accompanied by an infectious Nino Rota score.

"Almost all of Amarcord is a macabre dance against a cheerful background," said a contemporary review of the film, and Nino Rota is in peak form providing the music for this mesmerizing dance. By mining the rich musical world of 1920s and 1930s jazz and big band music, Rota fashions a creative, engaging score that is nostalgic for an era that never really existed—it only flourishes in the director's memories of his childhood. Almost every film score lover is familiar with the wistful main theme, and this is the first chance to hear exactly how much music Rota actually provided for the film.

A 30-minute LP of the soundtrack was released on CAM in 1973 and reissued many times on CD by the same company. For this premiere complete edition, we have included the entire 50-minute score on CD 1. On the second disc we have included more than 30 minutes of previously unreleased music with lots of alternates and music written by Rota that was not used in the final print of the movie, as well as a remastered version of the original album. The entire project has been produced by Claudio Fuiano and Jose M. Benitez, with painstaking DDP mastering by Chris Malone from the first-generation stereo master tapes courtesy of Gruppo Sugar.

The package includes a richly illustrated 16-page booklet with liner notes by Gergely Hubai, who discusses the making of the film and the score alongside selected images from the picture.
LOVE STORY
(EXPANDED)
Music by Francis Lai
Limited edition of 1000 units

Retail Price: 16.95€
PRE-ORDER

Availability date 2/23/2018
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Quartet Records, Paramount Pictures and Universal Music Group present the remastered, expanded release of the iconic score by the great Francis Lai (A Man and A Woman, Life for Life, House of Cards, Dark Eyes, Bilitis) for the unforgettable 1970 romantic classic Love Story, directed by Arthur Hiller and starring Ryan O’Neal, Ali McGraw, Ray Milland and John Marley.
 
The film was nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best Picture, Director, Screenplay and O’Neal and McGraw’s performances, but won only in the Best Original Score category (the only Oscar ever won by the prolific French composer).
 
The choice of Francis Lai was a personal obsession of producer Robert Evans, who pursued the composer until he accepted, despite Lai initially refusing to compose the score due to other commitments. But Evans' intuition was spot-on. Today, Lai’s Love Story score remains one of the most memorable and richly lyrical works in the canon of romantic film scores. The main theme remains one of the most famous melodies in film history, covered countess times—including an especially memorable arrangement by Henry Mancini for RCA.  
 
The original soundtrack LP of Love Story has been a tremendous success over the years, reissued repeatedly, including the CD edition that first appeared on the MCA label in the early ’90s. However, the sound quality of the CD and its reissues was not very good. For this release we have returned to the original master tapes that have been restored, corrected and mastered by Chris Malone, and the resulting sound quality is very much improved. Despite the high-profile reputation of this score, the film does not really contain much music—just over twenty minutes. The album included more music than the film, although some versions were edited, others re-recorded and expanded for the album, with different, lighter arrangements. So we are glad to present the original album plus the original score as it’s heard in the film, restored by Chris Malone from mono elements courtesy of Paramount Pictures (mostly stems and electrovox sources). A couple of alternates of the memorable cue “Snow Frolic” have also been included. This special release is limited to 1000 units and features exclusive, in-depth liner notes by writer Jeff Bond.

 

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1 hour ago, mstrox said:

Surprised that Silence of the Lambs is getting a release on quartet, instead of on Shore's own label.

 

Me too!  I should've placed a bet on Silence of the Lambs, as I suspected it might come up since Criterion released a new Blu-ray, but I assumed it would be expanded under Howe Records. Either way, it's great to have it

 

52 minutes ago, Denise Bryson said:

Was there much missing from the OST?

 

About 21 minutes' worth, according to the runtime of the new CD

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7 hours ago, Brundlefly said:

Quartet should stop that 1000 units shit or are they so often not able to release more units? These titles are definitely too popular for such limitations.

I agree. I don't have the money to buy such releases at once and when I do decide they go OOP.

I guess they would pay more money if they were to release more units?

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NEW RELEASES
APRIL 13, 2018

Available for order at
www.quartetrecords.com
WHITE FANG
Music by Bruno Coulais

Retail Price: 16.95€
IN STOCK
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Quartet Records and Superprod present the new score by renowned French composer Bruno Coulais (Microcosmos, Les choristes, Les adieux à la Reine, The Seasons) in his latest foray into scoring an animated film. It’s a genre to which he is no stranger after the success of his film scores for Coraline, Brendan et le secret de Kells, Le chant de la mer, Mune and Droles de petites bêtes, among others.
 
Directed by Alexandre Espigares (Academy Award winner for Best Animated Short with Mr. Hublot), this new adaptation of the timeless classic by Jack London is the story of a boy who befriends a half-breed wolf as he searches for his father, who has mysteriously gone missing during the Gold Rush.

Bruno Coulais provides an exciting symphonic score, full of leitmotifs for every character, action music, wondrously melodic themes, a deeply moving main theme—all refreshingly orchestrated and, performed by Irish folk group Kila and the Luxembourg Philharmonic Orchestra under the baton of Gast Waltzing (who also composed some additional music for the film).

The album also includes the original song “You Will Find a Home,” composed and performed by Bonnie “Prince” Billy. The package includes an eight-page full-color booklet.
MATHILDE
Music by Marco Beltrami
Limited Edition of 500 units.

Retail Price: 16.95€
Availability date: 04/17/2018
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Quartet Records and MovieScore Media presents the soundtrack album of Marco Beltrami's music for the controversial Russian historical film Mathilde, directed by Aleksey Uchitel.

The movie tells the story of the supposed romantic relationship between the heir to the Russian throne, Nicholas Romanov, and the ballerina of the Imperial Theater, Matilda Kshesinskaya. The story opens with the first meeting between the 22-year-old crown prince and 18-year-old ballerina in 1890, then follows the tormented affair up until the coronation of Nicholas and his wife Aleksandra in 1896.

Beltrami uses handful of themes to underscore the forbidden affair, anchored by Mathilde’s theme for the young dancer who finds herself in royal intrigue. The other major thematic elements include a lively chase theme written around a violin solo (‘Twilight of the Empire’) and a sinister theme for the proto-Rasputin mystic Dr. Fishel (‘Fishel’s Holograph’) and some chase sequences (“Tent Attack”, “Bear Attack”). The music was performed by the Mariinsky Theatre Symphony Orchestra, conducted by Valery Gergiev. The package includes liner notes by Gergely Hubai discuss the film and the score.
THE KING'S CHOICE
Music by Johan Söderqvist
Limited Edition of 500 units.

Retail Price: 16.95€
Availability date: 04/17/2018
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Quartet Records and MovieScore Media presents the soundtrack album of The King’s Choice, Erik Poppe's historical drama about Norway's involvement in World War II. Norway's official submission for 'Best Foreign Language Film' features Jesper Christensen (recently seen as Mr. White in the James Bond movies) as King Haakon VII.

On the 9th of April 1940, the German war machine arrives into the fjords of Oslo with the warship Blücher. Norwegian monarch King Haakon VII faces a choice that will change his country forever. While the German invaders strongly advise the King to nominate Norwegian Fascist-leader Vidkun Quisling as the prime minister, the king together with his government makes a brave choice.

Johan Söderqvist builds his film on a handful of memorable themes. One of the key ideas is urgency - since the events take place in only three days, the sense of urgency is represented by a ticking clock effect. The dark shadow of fascism looms over with a theme written for low-register brass,electronics and low drums. Finally, there's of course the theme for the king rounding out the album. The package includes liner notes by Gergely Hubai discuss the film and the score.
LAS LEYES DE LA TERMODINÁMICA
Music by Fernando Velázquez
Limited Edition of 500 units.

Retail Price: 16.95€
IN STOCK
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Quartet Records and Atresmedia present the new film score by Fernando Velázquez (The Impossible, A Monster Calls, Que baje Dios y lo vea, Thi Mai) for the new film directed by Mateo Gil (Blackthorn, Realive), and starring Vito Sanz, Berta Vázquez, Chino Darín and José María Pou.
 
The story is about Manel (Sanz), a somewhat neurotic physicist with a crushing theory: the laws of nature govern relationships. One day, Elena (Vázquez), an attractive and sought-after actress, falls in love with him. But when the relationship is over Manel tries to explain through physical laws how he is not the only one to blame for its failure.
 
The style of the film—part documentary and part fiction—was a very special challenge for Fernando Velázquez. He gave his score a kind of romantic and Impressionistic color, almost Deleruesque, with delicate orchestration and a beautiful, flowing leitmotif that unfolds slowly throughout the entire score. The music is performed by The Basque Symphony Orchestra under the baton of the composer.
PERFECTOS DESCONOCIDOS
Music by Víctor Reyes
Limited Edition of 350 units.

Retail Price: 16.95€
IN STOCK
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Quartet Records and Mediaset present the new score composed by Víctor Reyes (Buried, Red Lights, Grand Piano and Emmy Award winner for his score to the acclaimed TV series The Night Manager) for Alex de la Iglesia’s new comedy, Perfectos desconocidos, starring Belén Rueda, Eduard Fernández, Ernesto Alterio, Juana Acosta, Eduardo Noriega, Dafne Fernández and Pepón Nieto.
 
The story is about seven friends who gather for dinner and decide to play a game in which all incoming messages and calls will be on display for the entire group, leading to a series of revelations that gradually unravels their “normal” lives.
 
Víctor Reyes provides a wonderful score—one that deftly weaves wit, slapstick, mystery and suspense with a classy touch. Echoes of Bernard Herrmann, Danny Elfman, Thomas Newman, John Addison and John Morris are mixed together in an exciting musical cocktail. Adam Klemens conducts The City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra.

 

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GRAND PIANO made my Top 10 that year. The film is somewhat of a potboiler, but not too shabby.

 

Pretty decent batch from Quartet. Not too impressed with Söderqvist's THE KING'S CHOICE, though (I've had a promo for a couple of years). It's been a while since he did a really good score; I think KON-TIKI was the last one I really liked.

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12 minutes ago, kaseykockroach said:

I'd normally snark about the obscurity of these scores, but considering Intrada is apparently putting out two meh Horner scores in a row, I can appreciate something a tad more intriguing.

 

That's a weird sentiment.

 

First of all, none of these composers are particularly obscure, even if the films may not be huge international blockbusters (THE KING'S CHOICE, incidentally, was one of the most-viewed films in Norway in 2016).

 

Second, I find releases like this a thousand times more interesting than generic blockbusters or umpteenth expansions of old and famous titles.

 

Are we only supposed to release blockbuster titles?

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21 minutes ago, Thor said:

GRAND PIANO made my Top 10 that year. The film is somewhat of a potboiler, but not too shabby.

 

Pretty decent batch from Quartet. Not too impressed with Söderqvist's THE KING'S CHOICE, though (I've had a promo for a couple of years). It's been a while since he did a really good score; I think KON-TIKI was the last one I really liked.

 

I like the premise of Grand Piano, but after the true intentions of the bad guy are revealed it just gets stupid. And it wraps up too quickly when it reaches the climax.

 

I attended a live to picture screening of Kon-Tiki with the Trondheim Symphony Orchestra, which was good, but I'm not that impressed with the score.

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2 minutes ago, Jurassic Shark said:

 

I like the premise of Grand Piano, but after the true intentions of the bad guy are revealed it just gets stupid. And it wraps up too quickly when it reaches the climax.

 

I attended a live to picture screening of Kon-Tiki with the Trondheim Symphony Orchestra, which was good, but I'm not that impressed with the score.

 

Yes, I was at the premiere of the KON-TIKI film concert in Krakow (along with the Trondheim people who wanted it to Norway). I absolutely love the score, but I'm not a big fan of the 'film concert' idea in general.

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1 hour ago, Jurassic Shark said:

 

I'm surprised you don't like the concept. Is it because you get the complete score? ;)

 

No, rather because I consider it a 'fancy' form of cinema-going where most of the audience attention is on the screen and the story. I prefer concerts where the attention is solely devoted to the music.

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14 hours ago, Thor said:

 

No, rather because I consider it a 'fancy' form of cinema-going where most of the audience attention is on the screen and the story. I prefer concerts where the attention is solely devoted to the music.

 

I like it because I prefer to have music served live, and because the music usually gets more prominence in the "mix".

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3 hours ago, Thor said:

No, rather because I consider it a 'fancy' form of cinema-going where most of the audience attention is on the screen and the story. I prefer concerts where the attention is solely devoted to the music.

 

You can't account for the audience. I've been to rock concerts where half the people around me didn't care one inch about the music and just made lots of noise and disturbances. I go to LTP concerts to experience the music in a live setting while still serving its "official" purpose of supporting the film - much like an opera or a ballet.

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Yeah, I don't like that. As I said, then it's just a fancy way of going to the cinema (to experience the 'official purpose of the score'), with live performance instead of one attached to the soundtrack. If you go to the trouble of transcribing it to a concert setting, I want an actual concert where all attention is on the music. Some images on-screen or light show elements are OK, but that's as far as I go.


Just as with soundtrack albums, I want film music in concert to be as far removed from the film as humanly possible.

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On 14/04/2018 at 10:35 AM, Thor said:

Just as with soundtrack albums, I want film music in concert to be as far removed from the film as humanly possible.

One might almost start to think you're not too fond of films in general.

But, perhaps surprisingly, that isn't the case, is it?

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