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Non-JW Favourite Short Musical Moments


Jilal

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James Newton Howard again...

 

I just love that gorgeous descending chord progression with woodwinds and strings at 1:03 (he does this sort of thing all the time, it's lovely).

 

 

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I don't know why this thread is not just for any music (to compare composition styles) but to compare my favorite track from JW, when the flutes here sound the epic Star Wars triad then three hsteps lower, in their second repeated counter the last triad is played rather softly as to fade out. It wasn't intentional by Williams but it is utterly beautiful and logical: the instruments are having a conversation, and sometimes Williams' music is equated to alien or supernatural emotional conversations like an extra invisible character in a movie, and because Williams music is already so well-constructed, some moments even accidentally in their conversation will hit home or make perfect logical sense. See, the flutes are like a guiding spirit here wanting to give their voice heard to the hero, but they know the more powerful forces in instruments are at play to the story, the grand scheme of this epoch, and they're passively fading out to give way to the story being taken over by the less pure but more human string section, or to the conscience of the hero. It is like watching the primordial universe being formed or like stars communicating amongst each other to plan planets. That one softer flute triad is a brilliant mistake of the sort that when a composer conducts it, he would often go back to write more of what the player played.

 

The fading flute part is excty 3:27

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Upon re-watching this film in my first-ever live-to-projection concert with the Sydney Symphony Orchestra, I can confidently say that the minute of music from 0:25-1:25 has become one of my favourite hidden gems from this beautiful score. It is absolutely pitch-perfect for the scene which it accompanies. Desplat knows how to hit the audience in the feels with a wonderful lightness of touch.

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0:36 - 0:56. The woodwinds are delightfully playful. You can hear the fun. It may be written note specific, but you get the feeling that it sounds improvised.

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Love the little brass/winds flourish at 0:19 (I find the way it's superimposed onto the seemingly unrelated music preceding it very Alex North-ish), the brass cluster at 0:51 musically depicting the lights turning on, and the dreamy harp and percussion bit following it (reminds me of how Williams sometimes ends cues in a similar way).

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On 13/04/2023 at 2:17 AM, Edmilson said:

Alan Silvestri wrote a wonderful and moving theme for Contact (one of my favorite movies ever). But I personally think the B and C themes are even better. 

 

1:19 to 1:55

 

 

 

Me too. Very Copland-esque.

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On 13/04/2023 at 2:17 AM, Edmilson said:

Alan Silvestri wrote a wonderful and moving theme for Contact (one of my favorite movies ever). But I personally think the B and C themes are even better. 

 

1:19 to 1:55

 

 

 

Probably my favourite Silvestri Score.

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54 minutes ago, Jilal said:

https://youtu.be/F74vEpGbDk4&t=37s

 

My parents are watching A Perfect Murder and this was playing while I walked by. Very kickass in a Goldsmith kind of way with the quartal harmony and—if I'm not mistaken—mixed meter.

It sounds so much like Goldsmith :D

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The climax of Spiders Attack from Broughton's Lost In Space:

 

 

(Yes, this is my replication of the film edit.  That's just how it's been burned into my mind; it's not my fault I had to wait 18 years to hear the cue the way it was originally recorded!)

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3 hours ago, Jay said:

You recreated a film edit that removes music instead of enjoying what the composer composed?

 

Eh?  The film edit here is longer than the recorded cue.  It repeats the ostinato three times instead of the recorded two.

 

The Recorded Version:

 

The Film Edit:

 

The recorded version feels like it ends too abruptly for me, which is why I usually stick with the film edit for that particular moment in this sequence.

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@Jay Do you have the 2016 2-CD Album?  IIRC I think I remember you mentioning you had the 1-CD Intrada.

 

(This is the one score that's defined who I am as a score fan throughout my entire life.  I am as obsessively analytical with this score as Manakin is with the Prequels.)

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Yup I do!  And I've listened to it and like it.  I just had no idea that some random part in one track was looped in the film

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Yep; there's a ton of edits in the film to cues that would never see the light of day until the 2016 release.  Major Mayhem (which incorporates Spiders Attack) and Boarding The Proteus, Pt.2 (which incorporates The Proteus (Alternate)) are the two big examples that come to mind.

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John Addison is a great composer.

A BRIDGE TOO FAR (a film that had a very personal connection for Addison), is my utter favourite.

I'd recommend:

THE SCARLET BUCCANEER (aka SWASHBUCKLER),

SLEUTH,

TORN CURTAIN,

THE SEVEN PERCENT SOLUTION,

THE CHARGE OF THE LIGHT BRIGADE,

THE MAGGIE,

THE COCKLESHELL HEROES,

A TASTE OF HONEY,

and 

THE LONELINESS OF THE LONG DISTANCE RUNNER.

His first score is from a minor British classic: SEVEN DAYS TO NOON.

 

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Love the opening 22 seconds of this. I'm not sure why, but I would actually love a full 3 minute cue like that. Lewis wrote 2 really fun christmas scores last year and I keep coming back to this moment in particular.

 

 

 

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The first 1:50 of this track is some of my favorite JNH ever. It's like it's saying that yes, although you've been through a lot of pain and suffering, you're not alone and you can still heal from your wounds. It's like a musical hug.

 

 

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10 hours ago, Edmilson said:

Some of my most beloved Horner moments of all time:

 

How did he DO that?!? Your head is thinking "Well this is the old bag of Horner tricks" and your heart is shouting "I'm breaking in half, here!"

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2 hours ago, Tallguy said:

 

How did he DO that?!? Your head is thinking "Well this is the old bag of Horner tricks" and your heart is shouting "I'm breaking in half, here!"

I know, right? I don't care if this is just an old bag of typical Hornerisms, they remain as effective as ever in moving me.

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19 hours ago, Edmilson said:

What I love about Thomas Newman is that he is a master of knowing exactly what to do to extract the biggest amount of emotion of the listener.

 

This cue is an absolute masterpiece of that: it starts with the "Brooks Was Here" theme just for piano and synths and then at 1:50 the audience is surprised with some deeply moving and emotional strings. The Brooks Was Here melody continues but it gets a pensive oboe at 2:47 that climaxes with some of the most touching string writing ever written for any movie.

 

A masterful cue for a masterful score written for a masterful movie.

 

 

 

The deep string writing at the end of that cue is some of the best music I've ever heard. It's cathartic - at a perfect moment - and it's pretty much the most overtly emotional thing we - as viewers - have heard so far in the film... and it's just a man walking in a field. It works so fucking well.   

 

17 hours ago, Edmilson said:

During the end credits, the variation on the main theme for children's choir and orchestra that starts on 7:07 and goes until 7:35 is so positive, so life-affirming, so filled with joy and hope... I love it.

 

 

 

I love that moment too. Almost sounds like something that should be in one of his 90s animated films. Has an epic feel but a lovely innocence to it. 

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35 minutes ago, Edmilson said:

My favorite performances of My Heart Will Go On is not on any of the romantic moments and especially not the song, but rather during the sinking, when it's accompanied by one of my favorite Hornerisms ever (one that was especially present during the 90s and 2000s): fast snare drums and increasingly dramatic string runs a la Apollo 13.

 

5:28 to 5:58:

 

 

I love this passage! Always enjoyed the horn to trumpet transition as the phrase rises at 5:46.

 

There’s a similarly dramatic section he wrote for the trailer, at 3:36.
 

 
 

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4 minutes ago, Trope said:

There’s a similarly dramatic section he wrote for the trailer, at 3:36.

Wait, he wrote a 4 minute cue for a trailer? Was the trailer actually that long or he just wrote a bunch of music that his music editors could edit into a 2 minute trailer?

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