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What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)

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The Dead Pool - Dirty Harry 5, and by now Inspector Callahan is as comically indestructible as Moore's Bond. The deeply silly chase involving a remote-control toy car demonstrates just how far from the brilliant first film we've drifted.

Still ... there's a definite curiosity value to a movie that's got Eastwood, a wandering-accented Liam Neeson, 'James' Carrey AND Guns 'N' Roses in it.

Personal Services - amusing Julie Walters-starring comedy directed by Python's Terry Jones inspired by the story of Cynthia Payne, the (in)famous 'Luncheon Voucher Madam'.

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I watched Return Of The King yesterday. What is so striking is how ridiculously good this film is DESPITE its flaws. It's so good that they literally don't matter. 

And it looks better still than movies today, probably because PJ knew how dodgy CGI can look, and worked around it, whereas movies today think CGI looks good enough on its own. 

To this day I sometimes have to look really hard to see if something or someone is CGI in there. 

You can tweak a few CGI spots, put this film in theaters this weekend, and it would still have no rival. 

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1 hour ago, gkgyver said:

I watched Return Of The King yesterday. What is so striking is how ridiculously good this film is DESPITE its flaws. It's so good that they literally don't matter. 

And it looks better still than movies today, probably because PJ knew how dodgy CGI can look, and worked around it, whereas movies today think CGI looks good enough on its own. 

To this day I sometimes have to look really hard to see if something or someone is CGI in there. 

You can tweak a few CGI spots, put this film in theaters this weekend, and it would still have no rival. 

 

A lot of thw CGI looked dodgy in this, even back in 2003. FOTR, Gollum aside, always looked better to me

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There's some dodgy CGI sporadically throughout the entire trilogy, but it doesn't detract from the overall experience in the slightest IMO. I could highlight scenes from the three films where the special effects are a bit on the kooky side, CG included. But like the best beloved movies of yore, the imperfect sfx seem to add to the deep feeling of fondness for these films.

 

There are also numerous moments of incredible special effects in there, and Return of the King features what I consider one of the benchmarks for awesome composite work.

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It isn't really about the special effects, is it? Like, *gulp*, Star Wars. Believe me when I say I'm not trying to summon Chen G. People seem so fixated on the effects but they're merely a tool, means of telling a story. They don't really impact the characters and core drama.

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6 hours ago, Edmilson said:

Come on, guys, Inception is amazing! I re-watched it recently and it's pretty good.

Hell you can't even convince yourself.  Is it amazing or pretty good?

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solaris-1972-003-spaceship-interior.jpg?

 

Solaris

 

When it's good, it's great. But it never quite nails the high-minded profundity it aims for, does it? With the exception of the wife character, something about the limp cast, vague characterizations, and meandering length hold it back. It could definitely benefit from some real trimming, especially the first act. With that said, there are moments where it shines, but Tarkovsky has said so much more about love, memory and the human condition in the far more powerful Mirror.

 

To those who have seen both, how does Soderbergh's version compare? Is it worth checking out?

 

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2 hours ago, KK said:

When it's good, it's great. But it never quite nails the high-minded profundity it aims for, does it?

 

To be honest, multiple viewings are required. My third time with Solyaris was far more rewarding than my first. Now it's one of my favorite sci-fi movies. To me it's more a philosophical sci-fi movie than a love story in space. Also, when surrendering to its slow pace and, one can submerge in its soothing tranquillity while letting the visuals and atmosphere wash over you (that highway scene is goddamn hypnotizing!). The only scene I don't like is when the scientists in the library room are doing the philosophizing for us. 

 

2 hours ago, KK said:

To those who have seen both, how does Soderbergh's version compare? Is it worth checking out?

 

 

Soderbergh trimmed it down to a love story in space. I was not a fan, but several JWfaners think it's just as good, if not better than the original. 

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4 hours ago, KK said:

solaris-1972-003-spaceship-interior.jpg?

 

Solaris

 

When it's good, it's great. But it never quite nails the high-minded profundity it aims for, does it? With the exception of the wife character, something about the limp cast, vague characterizations, and meandering length hold it back. It could definitely benefit from some real trimming, especially the first act. With that said, there are moments where it shines, but Tarkovsky has said so much more about love, memory and the human condition in the far more powerful Mirror.

 

To those who have seen both, how does Soderbergh's version compare? Is it worth checking out?

 

 

That corridor badly needs Wall-E. 

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16 hours ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

WWTTFIW?

A dark and gritty gangster film, set in the north of England, where - oh, forget this. It's

GET CARTER, ok, and it's blooming brilliant!

GET CARTER

 

 

...or do you mean

On 5/12/2020 at 6:06 PM, Disco Stu said:

It's Saturday Night Fever

Stu was right.

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16 hours ago, Alexcremers said:

 

 

To be honest, multiple viewings are required. My third time with Solyaris was far more rewarding than my first. Now it's one of my favorite sci-fi movies. To me it's more a philosophical sci-fi movie than a love story in space. Also, when surrendering to its slow pace and, one can submerge in its soothing tranquillity while letting the visuals and atmosphere wash over you (that highway scene is goddamn hypnotizing!). The only scene I don't like is when the scientists in the library room are doing the philosophizing for us. 

 

I agree, it's just that its success at this aim struck me as uneven. I too did not enjoy the on-the-nose preaching in the conversation scenes. Like I said, Mirror covers much this thematic material with greater success. But you're right, this might fare better with future viewings.

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Screen-Shot-2020-05-14-at-8-59-08-PM.png

 

Synecdoche, New York

 

Finally got around to seeing it. I'm not entirely sure what to make of it, and I imagine it will be sitting with me for days to come. But I will say that I came out of this absolutely gutted. Kaufman walks a very fine line between neurotic self-indulgent mess and confoundingly brilliant portrait of creative consciousness. Either way, I can't help but applaud it. Some might call it bleak, even nihilistic and perhaps question whether its responsible for a filmmaker to use their work as a means of unhinged self-diagnosis. Kaufman appears to be aware of this (of course), as one of his extras voice this concern in the final act: "No one wants to hear my misery, because they have their own". But his fractured stream-of-consciousness manages to juggle all these ideas in a way that I think most people will still be able to find themselves on screen, in one form or another. Definitely needs some repeated viewings.

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22 hours ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

Nice...except that GET CARTER is set in Newcastle, and not Manchester :lol:


That said, there is a link between Corrie and Get Carter ... the gangster that Caine throws off the multi-storey car park is played by Bryan 'Alf Roberts' Mosley

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8 hours ago, KK said:

Synecdoche, New York

 

Finally got around to seeing it. I'm not entirely sure what to make of it, and I imagine it will be sitting with me for days to come. But I will say that I came out of this absolutely gutted. Kaufman walks a very fine line between neurotic self-indulgent mess and confoundingly brilliant portrait of creative consciousness. Either way, I can't help but applaud it. Some might call it bleak, even nihilistic and perhaps question whether its responsible for a filmmaker to use their work as a means of unhinged self-diagnosis. Kaufman appears to be aware of this (of course), as one of his extras voice this concern in the final act: "No one wants to hear my misery, because they have their own". But his fractured stream-of-consciousness manages to juggle all these ideas in a way that I think most people will still be able to find themselves on screen, in one form or another. Definitely needs some repeated viewings.

 

I mostly agree, only it doesn't get less gutting on repeated viewings. It's marginally easier in that regard than Requiem for a Dream insofar as a have re-watched SNY once or twice, while so far I haven't dared to do so with RFaD.

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5 hours ago, Glóin the Dark said:

"The smash-hit comedy of the year!"

 

DaWwkxVVQAAGkDO?format=jpg&name=small

 

Is this real??

 

1 hour ago, Marian Schedenig said:

 

I mostly agree, only it doesn't get less gutting on repeated viewings. It's marginally easier in that regard than Requiem for a Dream insofar as a have re-watched SNY once or twice, while so far I haven't dared to do so with RFaD.

 

I haven't even touched that one yet. It's on the list, but I've been putting it off for years...

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26 minutes ago, KK said:

Is this real??

 

8 minutes ago, Jay said:

No.

 

It absolutely is. I've got it right here beside me.

 

I'd love to see their choice for the smash hit comedy of each other year. "1972: Cries and Whispers!"

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27 minutes ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

2004:

Yes, it's the smash hit, ripsnorting, hilarious new feelgood, family comedy, that simply everyone is talking about!

  Reveal hidden contents

 

 

That ending was a barrel of laughs! Had me in a neck brace!

 

ROTFLMAO

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The dark knight rises.

 

I got a little tired of the never-ending ‘Bruce is Batman?’ thing, Michael Caine, Marion Cotillard and the romance between her, Bruce and Catwoman that came out of nowhere, though there were some unexpected light-hearted moments I did like. Two men punching each other, nice. Batman growling some more, yay. Tom Hardy was fantastic at first, but he should have said less to Batman. And exactly what is it that the League of Shadows has against Gotham? The football stadium sequence and Bane’s subsequent speeches are fantastic, but Bruce’s fellow prisoner makes no sense: first he cures him, then he doesn’t understand why cured Batman wants to try and escape and when he fails, he’s disappointed. Also got a bit tired of Catwoman after two hours. Cotillard tells her story too quickly and her final scene is terrible. Just like in the previous entry, one or two sentences explaining why people were doing what they did would have made a real difference. A little less fighting too, for that matter. Aww, Blake is the new Batman, how sweet.

Five seconds of movie and the first note is a good old D played on good old double basses. Bane’s music did fill me with a primal energy that I hadn’t felt in a long time when I first heard it tonight. The party music is nice too, as is Catwoman’s theme, but most of the music hardly develops at all: the action cues all sound as though they are the finale of all finales and when the final finale finally comes, many thematic opportunities are missed and Zimmer just refuses to use any other key for most of the time. Bane’s music did change during his public speeches and the effect was stunning. I also liked the action music slowing down when Batman failed to jump, but there are some jarring electronic sounds that keep coming back in emotional scenes, though it was very refreshing to hear just one trumpet and, yes, I will admit the very final cue was touching.

 

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People criticize Lucas (and rightfully so), but TDKR also features some of the most hilarious dialogue ever put in a supposedly serious movie. I LOL every time I remember the opening sequence or Ben Mendehlson saying "You're pure evil!" to Bane.

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5 hours ago, Edmilson said:

People criticize Lucas (and rightfully so), but TDKR also features some of the most hilarious dialogue ever put in a supposedly serious movie. I LOL every time I remember the opening sequence or Ben Mendehlson saying "You're pure evil!" to Bane.

 

An expression taken from real life and thus recognizable and relatable. Lucas' dialog is a whole other story.

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