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igger6

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  1. Thanks
    igger6 got a reaction from ThePenitentMan1 in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  2. Like
    igger6 got a reaction from Falstaft in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  3. Haha
    igger6 reacted to Alex in OBI-WAN KENOBI - spoilers allowed for all aired episodes   
    I enjoyed this episode. Here’s one of my favourite stills.
     
     

  4. Haha
    igger6 reacted to greenturnedblue in OBI-WAN KENOBI - spoilers allowed for all aired episodes   
    Woulda liked to see a scene of Vader coming back aboard his star destroyer after having his mask blown open, and crushing the windpipe of anyone who dares look at him
  5. Like
    igger6 reacted to DarthDementous in OBI-WAN KENOBI - spoilers allowed for all aired episodes   
    Episode 6 gave me really similar feelings to ROTS, in particular its ending

    However, that's probably the most damning thing I could say about it, because it shows that ultimately "Kenobi" leaves us at the exact same place we were at the end of "Revenge of the Sith", looking ahead to "A New Hope" - thus rendering the entire show redundant
     

    Agreed! Continuing on the ROTS vibes, I found Ewan's tearful apology to Vader quite moving despite none of that emotion coming through in anything that happened previously, much like his "You were my brother Anakin" monologue
  6. Like
    igger6 reacted to Chen G. in OBI-WAN KENOBI - spoilers allowed for all aired episodes   
    An uneven episode - especially the obligatory "villain redeems theirselves" schtick - but other parts had surprising amounts of pathos to them. I liked it.
  7. Like
    igger6 got a reaction from ThePenitentMan1 in What are your thoughts on John Williams' new theme for Obi-Wan?   
    Exceptionally well-put.  That's exactly what it felt like.  My God, what might have been, with a production team that cared about honoring that sound and a composer capable of producing it!
  8. Haha
    igger6 reacted to Not Mr. Big in What are your thoughts on John Williams' new theme for Obi-Wan?   
    It would have been great in a score with PT/OT Star Wars themes and new interesting side-motifs (ala Solo).  But in the actual score, it functions as the dedicated "Only Star Warsy Thing Allowed" musically and becomes very repetitive.  
  9. Like
    igger6 reacted to artguy360 in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    The pulling out of classic themes like rabbits from a magician's hat didn't really work for me. I think the show wants those moments to feel like needle drop moments or something, but I never felt like the new music was building up to these moments of reusing classic themes (except maybe the Darth Vader material leading to the big quote of the Imperial March, that one kinda works). Instead it felt like classic themes were cut and pasted into the finale. The classic themes should have been there all along, in different variations that took the themes in new directions.  
     
    Edit: also, I didn't like the sound of the instrument playing Leia's theme. It sounded a little like a fart. However, I LOVED the woodwind playing the Force theme. I think woodwinds is the perfect setting for the Force theme to get away from the brassy, regal sound that JW has used so often for the Force theme.
  10. Thanks
    igger6 got a reaction from Andy in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  11. Like
    igger6 got a reaction from May the Force be with You in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  12. Like
    igger6 got a reaction from Holko in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  13. Like
    igger6 got a reaction from Cerebral Cortex in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  14. Thanks
    igger6 got a reaction from Tiburon in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  15. Like
    igger6 got a reaction from DarthDementous in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  16. Thanks
    igger6 got a reaction from MikeH in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Good job using the three legacy themes (maybe four? I buy the Qui-Gon quote) when you did, but it redeems nothing.  This score was a train wreck for which Williams and Ross tried to lay across the tracks in the final two weeks, but even they couldn't save it in that timeframe.  Chow (and maybe Holt) grossly misread the needs of the project, and if I had to guess, I'd guess Kathleen Kennedy saw the writing on the wall and got Williams involved.  Think about it.  Powell says Williams was on board Solo before he himself was.  If his arrival on this show was anything other than a rescue mission, they would have been hyping it for months.  That his theme was used so liberally testifies to what a snot bowl the existing score must have been.
     
    But back to the sudden reveal of the 3.5 themes.  (I don't count the "Hyperspace" quote.  That was just kind of odd, given the rest of the score—like someone's amnesia cleared up temporarily.)  Saving lush and beloved melodies only for the final appearances of each character isn't intelligent and restrained; it's inane and self-defeating.  The point of writing melodic leitmotifs is to enjoy the melody while it's playing and associate it with the characters and situations it describes, both as the story unfolds and when you hear it again outside the work—not to salivate over chords and note pairs that may or may not be leading somewhere familiar.  (This can work, as in Rogue One's mid-movie Leia reference during Bail's dialogue, but noticing it shouldn't require Robert Langdon levels of scrutiny).  If the score didn't touch any other themes but the Force, Vader, and Leia—heck, even if it reserved those themes for the biggest moments, and even if they were orchestrated in some simplistic Holty way—it still would have been better than what we've been doing for five weeks, basically licking traces of snot from the corner of the bowl and speculating that it tastes a little like Leia's theme.
     
    And yes, if the themes were present but poorly executed, we would be absolutely complaining about poor orchestrations of legacy themes, but only because in that corner of the multiverse, it would never even occur to us that someone could score a big moment for a legacy character with anything other than the character's theme.  The complaints here aren't hypocrisy; they're a testament to the mind-bogglingly misbegotten approach that was taken on the first draft of this score.
     
    I have never been so eager for an immediate re-score of a project than I am for this.  Sheesh, somebody start a Kickstarter.  I have no idea how I might have reacted to it with music that was more in the Star Wars wheelhouse.  It probably would have covered a multitude of sins of plotting and acting.
     
    After this mess, the whole of Star Wars fandom owes Michael Giacchino a gigantic apology.
  17. Haha
    igger6 reacted to greenturnedblue in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    I suppose what you call thematic material I call "mindless RCP crap"
  18. Thanks
    igger6 reacted to ThePenitentMan1 in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Right?!  As soon as that happened, I paused the video and said "Really?  THAT'S what you held off on using this theme for?!  This isn't satisfying!  This wasn't earned!"
     
    I didn't feel quite so strongly about the Leia/Force theme statements, but the disappointing treatment of Imperial March just beforehand (not to mention the entire rest of the show's music) kinda hindered my enjoyment of the one statement we got of each of those themes.
  19. Thanks
    igger6 reacted to DarthDementous in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Very odd placement for the only rendition of the Imperial March, wish it accompanied a more significant character moment for Vader than him communing with his Master in his chair
  20. Like
    igger6 reacted to Gibster in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    There is no defending the music in the show(1-6) it was awful and such a wasted opportunity. The only nice thing I can say about it is that JW wrote an amazing theme for it.
  21. Like
    igger6 reacted to Falstaft in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    I have a lot of thoughts, most of them negative. I will say, I thought the Force Theme was very effective, and one of the few times--maybe the only time!--this series sounded like Star Wars to me.
     
    I kind of got what they (Holt? Ross?) were going for during the rematch, a twist on the Obi Wan Theme that sort of evoked Battle of the Heroes. But man did that thin and inexpressive choir take me out of it, especially its intro. Was that synth? Same goes for the Imperial March; a fine little rendition, I guess, but something about the recording and/or performance just made it sound anemic.  
  22. Like
    igger6 reacted to Manakin Skywalker in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    This is precisely why this sort of music does not work with Star Wars. As said in the Empire of Dreams documentary, having a traditional symphonic score even back in 1977 was somewhat of a risk. But one that was taken, reviving a cultural interest in traditional film scores in the process.
     
    The problem is that most "contemporary" music does not last. It might to a specific generation who grew up with it, but these styles will eventually fade into obscurity and be considered old and obsolete. That is clearly not the case with any of John's Star Wars scores however.
     
    Everyone is already criticizing Kenobi's score for being too forgettable. And that forgettability is only going to amplify going forward, aside from John's theme.
     
    Hans Zimmer's style of writing *can* work under the right circumstances, such as for Dune perhaps, which I assume much like the original is going for a more contemporary approach.
     
    But it will not work with Star Wars, ever, as Star Wars was never meant to be contemporary. The political aspects might be based on contemporary issues, but the messages are designed to last, just like the scores.
  23. Like
    igger6 reacted to p0llux in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Themes and motifs are the bread and butter of the Star Wars musical universe, but you didn't need me to tell you that. It is not a stretch to be focused on those things in a series that's a direct sequel to the prequel trilogy and with a main theme by Williams himself. Honestly, I would also be happy if there were just appealing textures, but those are the kind of expectations I'd have for modern generic action flicks like Marvel films...
     
    You didn't hear the seeds because there really weren't any until ep5. The ones that were pointed out to me that appeared in earlier eps were very weak, trivial, and may as well not exist. You're not getting goosebumps because many of these "big" moments involved legacy characters and there were no legacy themes heard, which robbed the score of its goosebumps inducing effectiveness.
  24. Haha
    igger6 reacted to DiamondFire in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    don't even get me started on it. I haven't figured out if I can change it and it was an ACCIDENT when signing up lol
  25. Haha
    igger6 reacted to DarthDementous in Natalie Holt's OBI-WAN KENOBI (2022)   
    Goddamn it, I only just noticed and now I can’t unsee
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