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lairdo

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  1. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from Gurkensalat in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020 w/ CD & Blu-ray coming August 14 2020   
    Ok, so it turns out you can rip a MQA CD to lossless ALAC and retain that MQA info. Did not know that, and this makes A-B testing the files much easier!! (That I did know!)
     
    As I suspected, the differences were harder to detect (if even noticeable) with the same signal processing. I think the native 96/24 file is slightly brighter and dynamics are a bit easier to pick up. But overall, I would say they are pretty equivalent. The MQA version unfolds to 176.4 / 24 - so basically 4x on the frequency and up on the bit rate - at least according to my set up and playback device. If those stats are really accurate, I guess the MQA is nice benefit for those picking up the CD version ----- and playing it back in a native CD player with support or ripping it and then using a set up that takes the MQA signal all the way through. Otherwise, the information is useless and not worth it. And given Tidal is using MQA on its digital files, you can get the same impact streaming. I think I read that Amazon devices can even do an Atmos playback if you have Amazon Music HD. 
     
    Thus my conclusion, again so far and with limited testing, is that there is no downside to the MQA CD and probably not much upside either. It's just a thing.
     
    I would still rather have a DSD surround SACD.
     
     
     
     
  2. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from Amer in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020 w/ CD & Blu-ray coming August 14 2020   
    Interestingly, the Japanese deluxe edition comes in a jewel case with a sleeve of the main art and shiny gold logo. The deluxe is thicker than a standard CD jewel case. The booklet itself has the same image as the sleeve and the gold logo (but not shiny). Also included are  2 hard stock front insert cards - I guess if you don't want to have the booklet as the front image with JW and the orchestra? One card is an image with JW waving to the crowd with the traditional DGG yellow logo which is cool. (The DigiPack Deluxe Edition has this image as the gatefold when you open it.) The 2nd card is the Imperial March single cover art with the main image of JW & orchestra.
     
    The audio CD is green (not ivory as in my US release). Maybe this is because of the MQA? (I picked up a Japanese MQA version of Decca's The Planets & Star Wars Suite (Mehta, LA Phil) and it is a green CD too. (You can see the reflection of the green color in the shiny logo on the sleeve to the left of the bottom image.)
     
    The standard Japanese release is a normal sized jewel case. I have not opened that, so I am not sure if it has more than 1 card, but I am guessing it does not. Just the booklet. Probably a green CD too since the standard CD is also MQA. The DGG logo is also in gold on this release as it is on the US digipack. 
     
    All the text of these releases are in Japanese, although the tracks are given in both English and Japanese. 
     
    And very briefly (and preliminarily) on the MQA format which I wrote about earlier in this thread. Lots of hype out there about MQA taking a standard Redbook 44.1/16 bit audio pile and "unfolding" it up to 96/24 (or maybe 88.2/24). I listened to a few tracks of the CD on my Oppo 4k Blu-Ray which can playback MQA CDs natively. To my ear, this did not sound as good as the flac 96/24 files I bought from Preto Music. The MQA sounded dull in comparison. However, I want to redo this test as the signal processing path was different - in one case my Denon was decoding the Oppo's PCM stream, and in the other Mytek Brooklyn Bridge was doing this and feeding an analog system in to the Denon. So, same amplification, speakers and physical space, but different digital pathways. That could be what I heard. More to follow. 
     
    My gold LPs were shipped weeks ago, but they seem stuck in customs somewhere on the way to the US... 
     
     


  3. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from blondheim in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020 w/ CD & Blu-ray coming August 14 2020   
    That does not show up for me on the Apple Music US Store. I can follow the link and see it, but when I add it to my library, it does not play. Odd.
     
     
     
     
    Thanks for your notes. I was not at the concerts, so I was seeing the performance for the first time. I watched about a quarter of it today (my deluxe edition arrived yesterday from Presto Music).
     
    A few additional thoughts on the video and my playback set up. I'm watching on an Oppo 4K Blu-Ray, connected through a Denon receiver with Dolby Atmos. LG 4K (2019 model) for the video playback. The LG is doing the upsampling from 1080i. B&W 600 series speakers.
     
    I dislike the smoothing of modern TVs, so I have that turned off. The result is the filmic quality described earlier in this thread. You can definitely spot the results of this when you see the printed music in shots. Some stuff is easy to read, but other details are garbled by the 1080i and then further conversion. This does not take away from the concert or music - just an observation. Despite having the 4k version, I doubt there is enough market for a 4k disc release.

    Generally, I found the editing decent. They save the wide shot for big moments, and mostly follow along the key instruments (where they had cameras) or on JW or ASM (when she is playing). Like most concert films, I actually find this annoying at times because visually, we will be right on the harp strings (this is the most egregious close up), but of course the harp is not blasting out - the mix remains a neutral seat location. So, you eyes and ears do not match. This is not specific to this recording; you experience it in other concert recordings and if the mix changed, the music would severely suffer. It's less jarring to see the violins or French horns up close when they play because they cut through so much of the mix anyway. When the image is on Williams, you can also get distracted by audience members who are themselves distracted. I wish the crew had kept the light levels on the audience a bit lower. (There is one girl who looks interested, then bored, then seems to have fallen asleep on her father's lap.)
     
    Where I was very pleasantly surprised is how much I like the Atmos mix. There were some earlier posts in this thread speculating about that, but I have to say that it really is nice. Not being at the concert, I cannot try to compare the live sound. However, for my set up (which I think I have pretty dialed in), the surrounds and ceiling speakers felt right. Good amount of reverb and ambience behind me and nice wide sound field in the LCR speakers. The LFE is not overly aggressive. My wife thought it sounded better than what we heard in Tanglewood last July. (Of course, that is not really a fair comparison given the differences in the venues and orchestras.)
     
    I was also happy to discover the CD tracks as Blu-Ray audio only. I did not expect or process those were on the release. They show as the same resolution that the downloadable HD Audio is (96/24). I do think the performances are the same as the video, with the audience noise edited out. (I actually wish they had left the final applause in the CD release as you sometimes hear on other live recordings.) Sound settings seemed to allow me to select 2.0, 5.1 or Atmos mixes for both the video and audio-only tracks. I believe this is the second JW conducted 5.1 or higher mix ever released, right? There is a SACD of Close Encounters, but I think that is a remix not a return to the original tapes. Same with Schindler's List. There is the Dallas Winds JW album on SACD, but JW did not conduct that. Earthquake was released in a 4-channel format on LP, but again, I am guessing that was created from pieces. The only one i can think of is Yo-Yo Ma and JW which Sony released in a SACD-only version (2.0 and 5.0 audio) separate from the CD.  In any case, I really like the JW in Vienna multichannel mix, and I would love a SACD release too.
     
    So, from a technical perspective, I like the deluxe edition quite a lot, particularly in the audio region. I'm glad to have the record of the concert on video as well.
     
    I have the MQA CD on order too and will see how that sounds. (That will be 2.0 though.)

    As for the album/performance itself, which clearly has sparked some very polarizing views, I enjoy it a lot. I have done a number of runs to the music, and it works great in that setting (obviously, not the best acoustic experience that way). I've listened on my 2.1 set up at my computer, and that has been great. The Star Wars main title issue bothers me because it is pretty obvious. I heard the ET issue, but that feels wrong based on memory vs. on what is being played. I like Rebellion is Reborn in this format for the reasons of hearing the instrumentation. Raiders is enjoyable mostly because ASM is enjoying it (but I think David Newman was much faster in tempo with her in Munich last September on the same piece). I would rank this higher than the Dudamel, but perhaps not as high as the Spielberg/Williams 3. I think its on par with the Lockhart but that is so hard to compare because Lockhart focused on lesser played tracks. I'm so glad he did, because it's great to have those recorded.
     
     
    Addendum: It still gives me a thrill to see John Williams on the gold label. And he did genuinely look pleased to be able to play with the Vienna Philharmonic.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  4. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from MaxTheHouseelf in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020 w/ CD & Blu-ray coming August 14 2020   
    That does not show up for me on the Apple Music US Store. I can follow the link and see it, but when I add it to my library, it does not play. Odd.
     
     
     
     
    Thanks for your notes. I was not at the concerts, so I was seeing the performance for the first time. I watched about a quarter of it today (my deluxe edition arrived yesterday from Presto Music).
     
    A few additional thoughts on the video and my playback set up. I'm watching on an Oppo 4K Blu-Ray, connected through a Denon receiver with Dolby Atmos. LG 4K (2019 model) for the video playback. The LG is doing the upsampling from 1080i. B&W 600 series speakers.
     
    I dislike the smoothing of modern TVs, so I have that turned off. The result is the filmic quality described earlier in this thread. You can definitely spot the results of this when you see the printed music in shots. Some stuff is easy to read, but other details are garbled by the 1080i and then further conversion. This does not take away from the concert or music - just an observation. Despite having the 4k version, I doubt there is enough market for a 4k disc release.

    Generally, I found the editing decent. They save the wide shot for big moments, and mostly follow along the key instruments (where they had cameras) or on JW or ASM (when she is playing). Like most concert films, I actually find this annoying at times because visually, we will be right on the harp strings (this is the most egregious close up), but of course the harp is not blasting out - the mix remains a neutral seat location. So, you eyes and ears do not match. This is not specific to this recording; you experience it in other concert recordings and if the mix changed, the music would severely suffer. It's less jarring to see the violins or French horns up close when they play because they cut through so much of the mix anyway. When the image is on Williams, you can also get distracted by audience members who are themselves distracted. I wish the crew had kept the light levels on the audience a bit lower. (There is one girl who looks interested, then bored, then seems to have fallen asleep on her father's lap.)
     
    Where I was very pleasantly surprised is how much I like the Atmos mix. There were some earlier posts in this thread speculating about that, but I have to say that it really is nice. Not being at the concert, I cannot try to compare the live sound. However, for my set up (which I think I have pretty dialed in), the surrounds and ceiling speakers felt right. Good amount of reverb and ambience behind me and nice wide sound field in the LCR speakers. The LFE is not overly aggressive. My wife thought it sounded better than what we heard in Tanglewood last July. (Of course, that is not really a fair comparison given the differences in the venues and orchestras.)
     
    I was also happy to discover the CD tracks as Blu-Ray audio only. I did not expect or process those were on the release. They show as the same resolution that the downloadable HD Audio is (96/24). I do think the performances are the same as the video, with the audience noise edited out. (I actually wish they had left the final applause in the CD release as you sometimes hear on other live recordings.) Sound settings seemed to allow me to select 2.0, 5.1 or Atmos mixes for both the video and audio-only tracks. I believe this is the second JW conducted 5.1 or higher mix ever released, right? There is a SACD of Close Encounters, but I think that is a remix not a return to the original tapes. Same with Schindler's List. There is the Dallas Winds JW album on SACD, but JW did not conduct that. Earthquake was released in a 4-channel format on LP, but again, I am guessing that was created from pieces. The only one i can think of is Yo-Yo Ma and JW which Sony released in a SACD-only version (2.0 and 5.0 audio) separate from the CD.  In any case, I really like the JW in Vienna multichannel mix, and I would love a SACD release too.
     
    So, from a technical perspective, I like the deluxe edition quite a lot, particularly in the audio region. I'm glad to have the record of the concert on video as well.
     
    I have the MQA CD on order too and will see how that sounds. (That will be 2.0 though.)

    As for the album/performance itself, which clearly has sparked some very polarizing views, I enjoy it a lot. I have done a number of runs to the music, and it works great in that setting (obviously, not the best acoustic experience that way). I've listened on my 2.1 set up at my computer, and that has been great. The Star Wars main title issue bothers me because it is pretty obvious. I heard the ET issue, but that feels wrong based on memory vs. on what is being played. I like Rebellion is Reborn in this format for the reasons of hearing the instrumentation. Raiders is enjoyable mostly because ASM is enjoying it (but I think David Newman was much faster in tempo with her in Munich last September on the same piece). I would rank this higher than the Dudamel, but perhaps not as high as the Spielberg/Williams 3. I think its on par with the Lockhart but that is so hard to compare because Lockhart focused on lesser played tracks. I'm so glad he did, because it's great to have those recorded.
     
     
    Addendum: It still gives me a thrill to see John Williams on the gold label. And he did genuinely look pleased to be able to play with the Vienna Philharmonic.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  5. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from GlastoEls in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020 w/ CD & Blu-ray coming August 14 2020   
    That does not show up for me on the Apple Music US Store. I can follow the link and see it, but when I add it to my library, it does not play. Odd.
     
     
     
     
    Thanks for your notes. I was not at the concerts, so I was seeing the performance for the first time. I watched about a quarter of it today (my deluxe edition arrived yesterday from Presto Music).
     
    A few additional thoughts on the video and my playback set up. I'm watching on an Oppo 4K Blu-Ray, connected through a Denon receiver with Dolby Atmos. LG 4K (2019 model) for the video playback. The LG is doing the upsampling from 1080i. B&W 600 series speakers.
     
    I dislike the smoothing of modern TVs, so I have that turned off. The result is the filmic quality described earlier in this thread. You can definitely spot the results of this when you see the printed music in shots. Some stuff is easy to read, but other details are garbled by the 1080i and then further conversion. This does not take away from the concert or music - just an observation. Despite having the 4k version, I doubt there is enough market for a 4k disc release.

    Generally, I found the editing decent. They save the wide shot for big moments, and mostly follow along the key instruments (where they had cameras) or on JW or ASM (when she is playing). Like most concert films, I actually find this annoying at times because visually, we will be right on the harp strings (this is the most egregious close up), but of course the harp is not blasting out - the mix remains a neutral seat location. So, you eyes and ears do not match. This is not specific to this recording; you experience it in other concert recordings and if the mix changed, the music would severely suffer. It's less jarring to see the violins or French horns up close when they play because they cut through so much of the mix anyway. When the image is on Williams, you can also get distracted by audience members who are themselves distracted. I wish the crew had kept the light levels on the audience a bit lower. (There is one girl who looks interested, then bored, then seems to have fallen asleep on her father's lap.)
     
    Where I was very pleasantly surprised is how much I like the Atmos mix. There were some earlier posts in this thread speculating about that, but I have to say that it really is nice. Not being at the concert, I cannot try to compare the live sound. However, for my set up (which I think I have pretty dialed in), the surrounds and ceiling speakers felt right. Good amount of reverb and ambience behind me and nice wide sound field in the LCR speakers. The LFE is not overly aggressive. My wife thought it sounded better than what we heard in Tanglewood last July. (Of course, that is not really a fair comparison given the differences in the venues and orchestras.)
     
    I was also happy to discover the CD tracks as Blu-Ray audio only. I did not expect or process those were on the release. They show as the same resolution that the downloadable HD Audio is (96/24). I do think the performances are the same as the video, with the audience noise edited out. (I actually wish they had left the final applause in the CD release as you sometimes hear on other live recordings.) Sound settings seemed to allow me to select 2.0, 5.1 or Atmos mixes for both the video and audio-only tracks. I believe this is the second JW conducted 5.1 or higher mix ever released, right? There is a SACD of Close Encounters, but I think that is a remix not a return to the original tapes. Same with Schindler's List. There is the Dallas Winds JW album on SACD, but JW did not conduct that. Earthquake was released in a 4-channel format on LP, but again, I am guessing that was created from pieces. The only one i can think of is Yo-Yo Ma and JW which Sony released in a SACD-only version (2.0 and 5.0 audio) separate from the CD.  In any case, I really like the JW in Vienna multichannel mix, and I would love a SACD release too.
     
    So, from a technical perspective, I like the deluxe edition quite a lot, particularly in the audio region. I'm glad to have the record of the concert on video as well.
     
    I have the MQA CD on order too and will see how that sounds. (That will be 2.0 though.)

    As for the album/performance itself, which clearly has sparked some very polarizing views, I enjoy it a lot. I have done a number of runs to the music, and it works great in that setting (obviously, not the best acoustic experience that way). I've listened on my 2.1 set up at my computer, and that has been great. The Star Wars main title issue bothers me because it is pretty obvious. I heard the ET issue, but that feels wrong based on memory vs. on what is being played. I like Rebellion is Reborn in this format for the reasons of hearing the instrumentation. Raiders is enjoyable mostly because ASM is enjoying it (but I think David Newman was much faster in tempo with her in Munich last September on the same piece). I would rank this higher than the Dudamel, but perhaps not as high as the Spielberg/Williams 3. I think its on par with the Lockhart but that is so hard to compare because Lockhart focused on lesser played tracks. I'm so glad he did, because it's great to have those recorded.
     
     
    Addendum: It still gives me a thrill to see John Williams on the gold label. And he did genuinely look pleased to be able to play with the Vienna Philharmonic.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  6. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from Pawel P. in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020 w/ CD & Blu-ray coming August 14 2020   
    That does not show up for me on the Apple Music US Store. I can follow the link and see it, but when I add it to my library, it does not play. Odd.
     
     
     
     
    Thanks for your notes. I was not at the concerts, so I was seeing the performance for the first time. I watched about a quarter of it today (my deluxe edition arrived yesterday from Presto Music).
     
    A few additional thoughts on the video and my playback set up. I'm watching on an Oppo 4K Blu-Ray, connected through a Denon receiver with Dolby Atmos. LG 4K (2019 model) for the video playback. The LG is doing the upsampling from 1080i. B&W 600 series speakers.
     
    I dislike the smoothing of modern TVs, so I have that turned off. The result is the filmic quality described earlier in this thread. You can definitely spot the results of this when you see the printed music in shots. Some stuff is easy to read, but other details are garbled by the 1080i and then further conversion. This does not take away from the concert or music - just an observation. Despite having the 4k version, I doubt there is enough market for a 4k disc release.

    Generally, I found the editing decent. They save the wide shot for big moments, and mostly follow along the key instruments (where they had cameras) or on JW or ASM (when she is playing). Like most concert films, I actually find this annoying at times because visually, we will be right on the harp strings (this is the most egregious close up), but of course the harp is not blasting out - the mix remains a neutral seat location. So, you eyes and ears do not match. This is not specific to this recording; you experience it in other concert recordings and if the mix changed, the music would severely suffer. It's less jarring to see the violins or French horns up close when they play because they cut through so much of the mix anyway. When the image is on Williams, you can also get distracted by audience members who are themselves distracted. I wish the crew had kept the light levels on the audience a bit lower. (There is one girl who looks interested, then bored, then seems to have fallen asleep on her father's lap.)
     
    Where I was very pleasantly surprised is how much I like the Atmos mix. There were some earlier posts in this thread speculating about that, but I have to say that it really is nice. Not being at the concert, I cannot try to compare the live sound. However, for my set up (which I think I have pretty dialed in), the surrounds and ceiling speakers felt right. Good amount of reverb and ambience behind me and nice wide sound field in the LCR speakers. The LFE is not overly aggressive. My wife thought it sounded better than what we heard in Tanglewood last July. (Of course, that is not really a fair comparison given the differences in the venues and orchestras.)
     
    I was also happy to discover the CD tracks as Blu-Ray audio only. I did not expect or process those were on the release. They show as the same resolution that the downloadable HD Audio is (96/24). I do think the performances are the same as the video, with the audience noise edited out. (I actually wish they had left the final applause in the CD release as you sometimes hear on other live recordings.) Sound settings seemed to allow me to select 2.0, 5.1 or Atmos mixes for both the video and audio-only tracks. I believe this is the second JW conducted 5.1 or higher mix ever released, right? There is a SACD of Close Encounters, but I think that is a remix not a return to the original tapes. Same with Schindler's List. There is the Dallas Winds JW album on SACD, but JW did not conduct that. Earthquake was released in a 4-channel format on LP, but again, I am guessing that was created from pieces. The only one i can think of is Yo-Yo Ma and JW which Sony released in a SACD-only version (2.0 and 5.0 audio) separate from the CD.  In any case, I really like the JW in Vienna multichannel mix, and I would love a SACD release too.
     
    So, from a technical perspective, I like the deluxe edition quite a lot, particularly in the audio region. I'm glad to have the record of the concert on video as well.
     
    I have the MQA CD on order too and will see how that sounds. (That will be 2.0 though.)

    As for the album/performance itself, which clearly has sparked some very polarizing views, I enjoy it a lot. I have done a number of runs to the music, and it works great in that setting (obviously, not the best acoustic experience that way). I've listened on my 2.1 set up at my computer, and that has been great. The Star Wars main title issue bothers me because it is pretty obvious. I heard the ET issue, but that feels wrong based on memory vs. on what is being played. I like Rebellion is Reborn in this format for the reasons of hearing the instrumentation. Raiders is enjoyable mostly because ASM is enjoying it (but I think David Newman was much faster in tempo with her in Munich last September on the same piece). I would rank this higher than the Dudamel, but perhaps not as high as the Spielberg/Williams 3. I think its on par with the Lockhart but that is so hard to compare because Lockhart focused on lesser played tracks. I'm so glad he did, because it's great to have those recorded.
     
     
    Addendum: It still gives me a thrill to see John Williams on the gold label. And he did genuinely look pleased to be able to play with the Vienna Philharmonic.
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
  7. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from Disco Stu in The New Yorker interview with John Williams   
    Those are lovely.
     
    4 Sea Interludes from Peter Grimes, Op. 33a is short but a wonderful experience. You don't need to know the opera to enjoy these.
    The Violin Concerto is great. Lots of recordings of it too. (Love the timpani to start it too. Wonder if brother Williams has played that.)
     
    I have seen Turn of the Screw (Seattle Opera) and Billy Budd (SF Opera) and enjoyed them both immensely. 
     
    (I am also listening to a lot of Leonard Bernstein and Dmitri Shostakovich!)
     
  8. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from karelm in The New Yorker interview with John Williams   
    Those are lovely.
     
    4 Sea Interludes from Peter Grimes, Op. 33a is short but a wonderful experience. You don't need to know the opera to enjoy these.
    The Violin Concerto is great. Lots of recordings of it too. (Love the timpani to start it too. Wonder if brother Williams has played that.)
     
    I have seen Turn of the Screw (Seattle Opera) and Billy Budd (SF Opera) and enjoyed them both immensely. 
     
    (I am also listening to a lot of Leonard Bernstein and Dmitri Shostakovich!)
     
  9. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from Will in The New Yorker interview with John Williams   
    The article is wonderful, and in The New Yorker style, almost more of a conversation than an interview. Ross not only raises interesting questions and gets interesting answers, but he also sets the scene for us in a way that invites us into the room. Perhaps because we on this site delve into all those micro edits, this is easier for us to imagine. Still, I think the average reader will also feel closer to Williams than they have in the past and know more about him beyond just the composer of big scores. It's been on my mind to re-read Ross's The Rest is Noise as I have been spending a lot of time listening to 20th century works. (Benjamin Britten and Mieczysław Weinberg have become fast favorites over the past year.) I guess I will follow my instinct.
     
    Images has also been on my mind to watch (still have not seen it despite having the Blu-Ray and ripping that to my iPad), and I will listen to the score again today. (Is that perhaps on JW's mind because of some sort of release beyond the Prometheus one that is coming? Wouldn't think so, but who knows?) When you combine that with his comments on Andrew Norman (I like his recent piece with the LA Phil & Gustavo "Sustain" and just got the BMOP SACD "Play" which I have not  cracked open yet), there is some sense of the modern composer coming through. I wish Ross had connected those thoughts to the original Star Wars score that contains these elements and presenting Williams' work as more linked than different careers by the same person.
     
    I do wonder if Anne-Sophie and JW mentioning the Violin Concerto over the past month in various interviews was because they (and their teams) knew it would show up in this article which is probably the widest circulation of this news?
     
    On Herrmann: I have no question in my mind that Herrmann is one of the most talented and amazing composers of film music. Perhaps he was the most innovative too, but I think, without trying to bring in the obvious bias that comes with being a regular here, Ross might miss a key aspect of Williams (or Korngold or Goldsmith) that puts him ahead. Not only has Williams innovated and done amazing works even to lesser films, he has also done so in a way that is memorable. Sure, I can hear in my head many themes by Herrmann, particularly for his Hitchcock scores, but not as many as Williams and not ones I want to spend as much time with --- and ones that also work perfectly with the films and can be played in concert halls. Popularism is not a bad thing, particularly if it brings the artistry to people in a way they wish to engage with. We have no true measure of "best" in any evaluation such as this, but I do think the acceptance of works after a period of evaluation is part of a measure the greatness. 
     
    Lastly, my congrats as well to Frank and Emilio.
     
    (And upon going back through the comments, Ludwig made my last point so much more eloquently!)
     
     
  10. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from Disco Stu in The New Yorker interview with John Williams   
    The article is wonderful, and in The New Yorker style, almost more of a conversation than an interview. Ross not only raises interesting questions and gets interesting answers, but he also sets the scene for us in a way that invites us into the room. Perhaps because we on this site delve into all those micro edits, this is easier for us to imagine. Still, I think the average reader will also feel closer to Williams than they have in the past and know more about him beyond just the composer of big scores. It's been on my mind to re-read Ross's The Rest is Noise as I have been spending a lot of time listening to 20th century works. (Benjamin Britten and Mieczysław Weinberg have become fast favorites over the past year.) I guess I will follow my instinct.
     
    Images has also been on my mind to watch (still have not seen it despite having the Blu-Ray and ripping that to my iPad), and I will listen to the score again today. (Is that perhaps on JW's mind because of some sort of release beyond the Prometheus one that is coming? Wouldn't think so, but who knows?) When you combine that with his comments on Andrew Norman (I like his recent piece with the LA Phil & Gustavo "Sustain" and just got the BMOP SACD "Play" which I have not  cracked open yet), there is some sense of the modern composer coming through. I wish Ross had connected those thoughts to the original Star Wars score that contains these elements and presenting Williams' work as more linked than different careers by the same person.
     
    I do wonder if Anne-Sophie and JW mentioning the Violin Concerto over the past month in various interviews was because they (and their teams) knew it would show up in this article which is probably the widest circulation of this news?
     
    On Herrmann: I have no question in my mind that Herrmann is one of the most talented and amazing composers of film music. Perhaps he was the most innovative too, but I think, without trying to bring in the obvious bias that comes with being a regular here, Ross might miss a key aspect of Williams (or Korngold or Goldsmith) that puts him ahead. Not only has Williams innovated and done amazing works even to lesser films, he has also done so in a way that is memorable. Sure, I can hear in my head many themes by Herrmann, particularly for his Hitchcock scores, but not as many as Williams and not ones I want to spend as much time with --- and ones that also work perfectly with the films and can be played in concert halls. Popularism is not a bad thing, particularly if it brings the artistry to people in a way they wish to engage with. We have no true measure of "best" in any evaluation such as this, but I do think the acceptance of works after a period of evaluation is part of a measure the greatness. 
     
    Lastly, my congrats as well to Frank and Emilio.
     
    (And upon going back through the comments, Ludwig made my last point so much more eloquently!)
     
     
  11. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from Falstaft in The New Yorker interview with John Williams   
    The article is wonderful, and in The New Yorker style, almost more of a conversation than an interview. Ross not only raises interesting questions and gets interesting answers, but he also sets the scene for us in a way that invites us into the room. Perhaps because we on this site delve into all those micro edits, this is easier for us to imagine. Still, I think the average reader will also feel closer to Williams than they have in the past and know more about him beyond just the composer of big scores. It's been on my mind to re-read Ross's The Rest is Noise as I have been spending a lot of time listening to 20th century works. (Benjamin Britten and Mieczysław Weinberg have become fast favorites over the past year.) I guess I will follow my instinct.
     
    Images has also been on my mind to watch (still have not seen it despite having the Blu-Ray and ripping that to my iPad), and I will listen to the score again today. (Is that perhaps on JW's mind because of some sort of release beyond the Prometheus one that is coming? Wouldn't think so, but who knows?) When you combine that with his comments on Andrew Norman (I like his recent piece with the LA Phil & Gustavo "Sustain" and just got the BMOP SACD "Play" which I have not  cracked open yet), there is some sense of the modern composer coming through. I wish Ross had connected those thoughts to the original Star Wars score that contains these elements and presenting Williams' work as more linked than different careers by the same person.
     
    I do wonder if Anne-Sophie and JW mentioning the Violin Concerto over the past month in various interviews was because they (and their teams) knew it would show up in this article which is probably the widest circulation of this news?
     
    On Herrmann: I have no question in my mind that Herrmann is one of the most talented and amazing composers of film music. Perhaps he was the most innovative too, but I think, without trying to bring in the obvious bias that comes with being a regular here, Ross might miss a key aspect of Williams (or Korngold or Goldsmith) that puts him ahead. Not only has Williams innovated and done amazing works even to lesser films, he has also done so in a way that is memorable. Sure, I can hear in my head many themes by Herrmann, particularly for his Hitchcock scores, but not as many as Williams and not ones I want to spend as much time with --- and ones that also work perfectly with the films and can be played in concert halls. Popularism is not a bad thing, particularly if it brings the artistry to people in a way they wish to engage with. We have no true measure of "best" in any evaluation such as this, but I do think the acceptance of works after a period of evaluation is part of a measure the greatness. 
     
    Lastly, my congrats as well to Frank and Emilio.
     
    (And upon going back through the comments, Ludwig made my last point so much more eloquently!)
     
     
  12. Like
    lairdo reacted to Falstaft in The New Yorker interview with John Williams   
    I'm as floored as the rest of you! I knew from social media that Alex Ross had chatted w/ JW back in February, but had no idea about the content of their interview, or that the maestro himself apparently leafed through my catalogue. 
     
    I can't imagine the "online fan sites" Ross says Williams is "delighted" by could be anything other than JWfan. It means a lot, even in just this small way, to know that JW is aware of all the passion and interest his music has inspired in this little community.
     
  13. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from JacksonElmore in John Williams & the Vienna Philharmonic: January 18/19 2020 w/ CD & Blu-ray coming August 14 2020   
    The track is on Tidal too, in Master quality.
     
    https://tidal.com/browse/track/142439896
     
     
  14. Like
    lairdo reacted to Jay in THE RIVER expanded and remastered by Mike Matessino now available from Intrada Records   
    @TownerFan and @mahler3 have a new audio interview with Mike Matessino about this release (and Far & Away) on the Legacy of John Williams podcast feed!
     
    https://thelegacyofjohnwilliams.com/2020/05/12/mike-matessino-far-and-away-the-river/
  15. Thanks
    lairdo got a reaction from Ricard in THE RIVER expanded and remastered by Mike Matessino now available from Intrada Records   
    While I agree that order generally does not ultimately change the end experience since most of us (all?) will end up digitizing the release and therefore can have any and every combination of tracks we desire through playlists, we can think about possible reasons in categories.
     
    1. Legal/Licensing
    In this case, it might be that the ability for Intrada, La-La Land or any other label to release the expanded edition is because they have licensed the original album (or even had it previously) and are expanding this. As such, the license holders might require the album tracks to be sequenced first
     
    2. Space/Logical placement
    When the releases span more than one disc, this might play a factor as to where the tracks go so as to best utilize the disc layout. For example, in the case of Saving Private Ryan and Schindler's List, I am not sure another arrangement would have made much sense other than to sequence the OST first and the few extra tracks second.
     
    3. Mike's preference
    Even if we all rip the discs and combine the tracks as we see fit, I suspect Mike might have a preferred listening order. Or it might be that Mike (or the publisher) thinks the marketability of the disc(s) is better with the album first or last or in between.
     
    4. The Maestro's preference
    This one is probably a meta reason as I believe that John Williams, or at least his team, sign off on every aspect of these releases. Given that JW felt the materials for The River would allow for and be interesting as an album with its own arrangements, we can suppose that he likes the original presentation. And as such, this is what he feels is the best way to enjoy the themes and treatment of the music. Hence, put it first if he wants it. There may be other instances where he is less committed to that, and then the original album gets placed based on someone else's desire. (As a side note, recall that Superman's source music was relegated to the Superman II/III La-La Land release because presumably he or his team wanted only his music on that. In that release, while discs 1 and 2 focused on the score and alternates, the remastered OST had its own disc regardless of numbering.)
     
     
    I think another, separate question is "why" did The River originally get this treatment of an extra recording day, and the work done to compose, orchestrate and ready the parts for recording them? We know from the linear notes that Universal was banking of the film being a big success: Mark Rydell coming off On Golden Pond, Sissy Spacek off of Coal Miner's Daughter, topical story, Mel Gibson's first US movie, and John Williams in the glow of successes (films and music releases) such as ET, Raiders, Superman, Star Wars and Jaws + his very visible Boston Pops appointment and broadcasts + his triumph at the LA Olympics. Were these factors enough to create what amounts to a special version of the score? Did JW push for it because of what it represented to him and showed his abilities in a different light than the summer blockbusters? Interestingly, as far as I can determine, The River's music only shows up in 3 groups of releases: 1. The OST/Expanded release; 2. A series of MCA Record compilations of JW's music for MCA/Universal that were released in various countries; and, 3. the 4-disc collection from Silva Screen and Silva's variants of their various re-recordings (such as a Mel Gibson's movie music).
     
    I do not think JW ever recorded this with the Boston Pops. Did he play it at a concert though? I find trying to search the BSO/BPO old programs an exasperating experience, so I have not tried to find out.
     
    Lastly, all this aside, I found listening to the whole album in sequence yesterday completely enjoyable. Both OST and score presentations are rewarding.
     
     
     
     
  16. Thanks
    lairdo got a reaction from The Five Tones in THE RIVER expanded and remastered by Mike Matessino now available from Intrada Records   
    While I agree that order generally does not ultimately change the end experience since most of us (all?) will end up digitizing the release and therefore can have any and every combination of tracks we desire through playlists, we can think about possible reasons in categories.
     
    1. Legal/Licensing
    In this case, it might be that the ability for Intrada, La-La Land or any other label to release the expanded edition is because they have licensed the original album (or even had it previously) and are expanding this. As such, the license holders might require the album tracks to be sequenced first
     
    2. Space/Logical placement
    When the releases span more than one disc, this might play a factor as to where the tracks go so as to best utilize the disc layout. For example, in the case of Saving Private Ryan and Schindler's List, I am not sure another arrangement would have made much sense other than to sequence the OST first and the few extra tracks second.
     
    3. Mike's preference
    Even if we all rip the discs and combine the tracks as we see fit, I suspect Mike might have a preferred listening order. Or it might be that Mike (or the publisher) thinks the marketability of the disc(s) is better with the album first or last or in between.
     
    4. The Maestro's preference
    This one is probably a meta reason as I believe that John Williams, or at least his team, sign off on every aspect of these releases. Given that JW felt the materials for The River would allow for and be interesting as an album with its own arrangements, we can suppose that he likes the original presentation. And as such, this is what he feels is the best way to enjoy the themes and treatment of the music. Hence, put it first if he wants it. There may be other instances where he is less committed to that, and then the original album gets placed based on someone else's desire. (As a side note, recall that Superman's source music was relegated to the Superman II/III La-La Land release because presumably he or his team wanted only his music on that. In that release, while discs 1 and 2 focused on the score and alternates, the remastered OST had its own disc regardless of numbering.)
     
     
    I think another, separate question is "why" did The River originally get this treatment of an extra recording day, and the work done to compose, orchestrate and ready the parts for recording them? We know from the linear notes that Universal was banking of the film being a big success: Mark Rydell coming off On Golden Pond, Sissy Spacek off of Coal Miner's Daughter, topical story, Mel Gibson's first US movie, and John Williams in the glow of successes (films and music releases) such as ET, Raiders, Superman, Star Wars and Jaws + his very visible Boston Pops appointment and broadcasts + his triumph at the LA Olympics. Were these factors enough to create what amounts to a special version of the score? Did JW push for it because of what it represented to him and showed his abilities in a different light than the summer blockbusters? Interestingly, as far as I can determine, The River's music only shows up in 3 groups of releases: 1. The OST/Expanded release; 2. A series of MCA Record compilations of JW's music for MCA/Universal that were released in various countries; and, 3. the 4-disc collection from Silva Screen and Silva's variants of their various re-recordings (such as a Mel Gibson's movie music).
     
    I do not think JW ever recorded this with the Boston Pops. Did he play it at a concert though? I find trying to search the BSO/BPO old programs an exasperating experience, so I have not tried to find out.
     
    Lastly, all this aside, I found listening to the whole album in sequence yesterday completely enjoyable. Both OST and score presentations are rewarding.
     
     
     
     
  17. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from Jurassic Shark in THE RIVER expanded and remastered by Mike Matessino now available from Intrada Records   
    While I agree that order generally does not ultimately change the end experience since most of us (all?) will end up digitizing the release and therefore can have any and every combination of tracks we desire through playlists, we can think about possible reasons in categories.
     
    1. Legal/Licensing
    In this case, it might be that the ability for Intrada, La-La Land or any other label to release the expanded edition is because they have licensed the original album (or even had it previously) and are expanding this. As such, the license holders might require the album tracks to be sequenced first
     
    2. Space/Logical placement
    When the releases span more than one disc, this might play a factor as to where the tracks go so as to best utilize the disc layout. For example, in the case of Saving Private Ryan and Schindler's List, I am not sure another arrangement would have made much sense other than to sequence the OST first and the few extra tracks second.
     
    3. Mike's preference
    Even if we all rip the discs and combine the tracks as we see fit, I suspect Mike might have a preferred listening order. Or it might be that Mike (or the publisher) thinks the marketability of the disc(s) is better with the album first or last or in between.
     
    4. The Maestro's preference
    This one is probably a meta reason as I believe that John Williams, or at least his team, sign off on every aspect of these releases. Given that JW felt the materials for The River would allow for and be interesting as an album with its own arrangements, we can suppose that he likes the original presentation. And as such, this is what he feels is the best way to enjoy the themes and treatment of the music. Hence, put it first if he wants it. There may be other instances where he is less committed to that, and then the original album gets placed based on someone else's desire. (As a side note, recall that Superman's source music was relegated to the Superman II/III La-La Land release because presumably he or his team wanted only his music on that. In that release, while discs 1 and 2 focused on the score and alternates, the remastered OST had its own disc regardless of numbering.)
     
     
    I think another, separate question is "why" did The River originally get this treatment of an extra recording day, and the work done to compose, orchestrate and ready the parts for recording them? We know from the linear notes that Universal was banking of the film being a big success: Mark Rydell coming off On Golden Pond, Sissy Spacek off of Coal Miner's Daughter, topical story, Mel Gibson's first US movie, and John Williams in the glow of successes (films and music releases) such as ET, Raiders, Superman, Star Wars and Jaws + his very visible Boston Pops appointment and broadcasts + his triumph at the LA Olympics. Were these factors enough to create what amounts to a special version of the score? Did JW push for it because of what it represented to him and showed his abilities in a different light than the summer blockbusters? Interestingly, as far as I can determine, The River's music only shows up in 3 groups of releases: 1. The OST/Expanded release; 2. A series of MCA Record compilations of JW's music for MCA/Universal that were released in various countries; and, 3. the 4-disc collection from Silva Screen and Silva's variants of their various re-recordings (such as a Mel Gibson's movie music).
     
    I do not think JW ever recorded this with the Boston Pops. Did he play it at a concert though? I find trying to search the BSO/BPO old programs an exasperating experience, so I have not tried to find out.
     
    Lastly, all this aside, I found listening to the whole album in sequence yesterday completely enjoyable. Both OST and score presentations are rewarding.
     
     
     
     
  18. Haha
    lairdo got a reaction from ATXHusker in THE RIVER expanded and remastered by Mike Matessino now available from Intrada Records   
    Mine is in my mailbox! Will my meetings ever end?
  19. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from Remco in Summon the Heroes by Boston Pops with John Williams - NEW 2020 home recording dedicated to frontline workers   
    What an amazing treat to wake up to. Everything about this is top rate - the playing, the sentiment, the editing - and of course seeing two maestros - Keith Lockhart and the ultimate Maestro JW. 
     
    And just hearing John Williams both play the piano and speak - looking fit and healthy - is a gift to all of us.
     
    And then there are the Modal Nodes on the shelf as previously mentioned...
     
    I mean, how lucky are we to get to have this music in our lives?
  20. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from MikeH in Summon the Heroes by Boston Pops with John Williams - NEW 2020 home recording dedicated to frontline workers   
    What an amazing treat to wake up to. Everything about this is top rate - the playing, the sentiment, the editing - and of course seeing two maestros - Keith Lockhart and the ultimate Maestro JW. 
     
    And just hearing John Williams both play the piano and speak - looking fit and healthy - is a gift to all of us.
     
    And then there are the Modal Nodes on the shelf as previously mentioned...
     
    I mean, how lucky are we to get to have this music in our lives?
  21. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from carlborg in Summon the Heroes by Boston Pops with John Williams - NEW 2020 home recording dedicated to frontline workers   
    What an amazing treat to wake up to. Everything about this is top rate - the playing, the sentiment, the editing - and of course seeing two maestros - Keith Lockhart and the ultimate Maestro JW. 
     
    And just hearing John Williams both play the piano and speak - looking fit and healthy - is a gift to all of us.
     
    And then there are the Modal Nodes on the shelf as previously mentioned...
     
    I mean, how lucky are we to get to have this music in our lives?
  22. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from MaxTheHouseelf in Summon the Heroes by Boston Pops with John Williams - NEW 2020 home recording dedicated to frontline workers   
    What an amazing treat to wake up to. Everything about this is top rate - the playing, the sentiment, the editing - and of course seeing two maestros - Keith Lockhart and the ultimate Maestro JW. 
     
    And just hearing John Williams both play the piano and speak - looking fit and healthy - is a gift to all of us.
     
    And then there are the Modal Nodes on the shelf as previously mentioned...
     
    I mean, how lucky are we to get to have this music in our lives?
  23. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from crumbs in Summon the Heroes by Boston Pops with John Williams - NEW 2020 home recording dedicated to frontline workers   
    What an amazing treat to wake up to. Everything about this is top rate - the playing, the sentiment, the editing - and of course seeing two maestros - Keith Lockhart and the ultimate Maestro JW. 
     
    And just hearing John Williams both play the piano and speak - looking fit and healthy - is a gift to all of us.
     
    And then there are the Modal Nodes on the shelf as previously mentioned...
     
    I mean, how lucky are we to get to have this music in our lives?
  24. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from Taikomochi in Summon the Heroes by Boston Pops with John Williams - NEW 2020 home recording dedicated to frontline workers   
    What an amazing treat to wake up to. Everything about this is top rate - the playing, the sentiment, the editing - and of course seeing two maestros - Keith Lockhart and the ultimate Maestro JW. 
     
    And just hearing John Williams both play the piano and speak - looking fit and healthy - is a gift to all of us.
     
    And then there are the Modal Nodes on the shelf as previously mentioned...
     
    I mean, how lucky are we to get to have this music in our lives?
  25. Like
    lairdo got a reaction from Falstaft in Summon the Heroes by Boston Pops with John Williams - NEW 2020 home recording dedicated to frontline workers   
    What an amazing treat to wake up to. Everything about this is top rate - the playing, the sentiment, the editing - and of course seeing two maestros - Keith Lockhart and the ultimate Maestro JW. 
     
    And just hearing John Williams both play the piano and speak - looking fit and healthy - is a gift to all of us.
     
    And then there are the Modal Nodes on the shelf as previously mentioned...
     
    I mean, how lucky are we to get to have this music in our lives?
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