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What Is The Last Score You Listened To?

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3 hours ago, Jurassic Shark said:

Geez, don't you guys listen to anything else than backgrund music from films?

Well I did listen to some Sibelius in honor of our independence day last Friday. He is pretty good even though he didn't write background music for films at all!

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FYC season continues with...

 

Jojo Rabbit by Michael Giacchino

Far more soft-spoken than I expected. Walks the line between mediocrity and quaintly pleasant. 

 

Frozen II by Christophe Beck

I liked Beck's first score well enough, and enjoyed both Ant-Man scores thereafter. This is certainly an interesting sequel score, building on the original with great results. Personal favourite track was Fire and Ice, as I heard some classical influences, as well as some similar ideas as heard on Hoth in The Empire Strikes Back.

 

A Hidden Life by James Newton Howard

Now a third listen, sliding into first place for muse of the week. The classical pieces are well-selected in terms of album coherence. I could listen to Avro Pärt's Silentium for a good long while. The score proper is just so beautiful. 

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The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers Complete Recordings by Howard Shore: It has been a while since I took a listen to this and time really hasn't diminished my love for this music, on the contrary. Just brilliant!

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Full throttle Oscar season. Though for me, the two other Desplat's are better entries, in the sense that they are new for him. The Shore is lovely. The Pemberton is great. Some good late-year releases. 

 

Another soothing and romantic late-year surprise. The melody ain't dead yet!

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11 hours ago, Incanus said:

I think I'll take a listen Sami. Sounds pleasant enough but is hopefully more than just pleasant.

I can't say I hear any great tunes (yet) but the underscore is very well executed indeed.

 

Karol

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...if a bit too familiar by now.

 

 

The opening suite with its portentous bolero and the open fifth horns is musically nothing extraordinary, but it's, surprisingly enough, a rather fun piece. The rest of the score follows proper, with moments to behold every now and then but the sum never becomes more than its parts - it's inconsequential in a pleasant 90's sort of way. Still, for a second-tier sequel Jackman does well enough. 

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8 hours ago, publicist said:

The opening suite with its portentous bolero and the open fifth horns is musically nothing extraordinary, but it's, surprisingly enough, a rather fun piece. The rest of the score follows proper, with moments to behold every now and then but the sum never becomes more than its parts - it's inconsequential in a pleasant 90's sort of way. Still, for a second-tier sequel Jackman does well enough. 

 

I haven't heard the second one, but I'm not a fan of Jackman's first Jumanji score. The main theme was pretty bad, and the rest was forgettable, like stuff Silvestri would write on his sleep. And I usually like his scores for kid flicks, like Wreck It Ralph, Big Hero 6, Puss in Boots, etc.

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Peter Pan (2003) James Newton Howard

Some pretty good moments in an otherwise fairly serviceable score. Would maybe like to hear it again at some point, since I'm not quite convinced I've given it the proper attention in the times I've heard it. Probably should get to some of his other stuff in the meantime.

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And I definitely don't mind that. It's just that I feel like I somewhat tune out for a good chunk of it. I don't exactly get a decent narrative out of it, and I haven't picked up on any villain identities thus far. Still, there's a lot of positive qualities, namely in its style, orchestration, and its most prominent motifs being lovely. I probably would be less positive if I'd heard more stuff elsewhere, but there's enough here for a recommendation. Perhaps the OST is a more digestible presentation compared to the complete.

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Star Wars: The Force Awakens by John Williams (OST)

Star Wars: The Last Jedi by John Williams (Playlist with OST, FYC and ISO score selections)

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker by John Williams (FYC)

 

It gets better, and better, and better. The Force Awakens remains a fun and pleasurable listening experience, with all of its frenetic action and the ever sweeping theme for Rey. The Last Jedi, presented in a carefully constructed playlist encapsulating all the highlights within the constraints of an hour, hits even greater heights, building on the themes of the sequel trilogy to great effect whilst introducing new music of great coherence as part of the whole. And then there's The Rise of Skywalker, which, if the mere fraction of the score presented on the promotional album is any indication, is a brilliant end, both fitting, exciting, fulfilling and entertaining. Today is the day I look back (and, yes, forward for a little longer) on Williams great gift to us, one that few could have expected to come to such fruition, let alone the fact that the output is consistently soaring beyond the imagination's bounds. This is it; the sequel trilogy scores. I embrace them wholeheartedly, and give thanks for not only their existence, but for their creator and our beloved composer John Williams. 

 

Motherless Brooklyn by Daniel Pemberton

Well I enjoyed the tracks Woman in Blue and Motherless Brooklyn, but I wasn't overly impressed in the end. It's not that the jazz wasn't the way to go here, it's just that it never amounts to anything that has me going back to it lately. 

 

Pride and Prejudice by Dario Marianelli

One of my favourite scores of its decade from one of my favourite films of its decade. Particularly enjoyed the tracks Darcy's Letter and Georgiana this time around.

 

Operation Finale by Alexandre Desplat

The Grand Budapest Hotel by Alexandre Desplat

The former is a fascinating showing from Desplat, capturing a unique essence that I can't quite describe. Great theme and loved the piano work. The latter is as pleasant an album as you'll ever find. Pretty much every cue has been getting repeated plays on my end lately.

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Total Recall.

 

Listening to this, one would almost feel sorry for the members of the Graunke Symphony Orchestra that attempted to perform this and failed.

 

Comparing both versions of Clever Girl shows that even when the Munich performance was shown in its most favourable light, being assembled from about 8 takes, they simply aren't able to deliver the kinetic energy the music required, and the NPO provided in spades.

 

 

 

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After The SE trilogy...

 

Star Wars: The Force Awakens by John Williams (C&C Playlist including the FYC)

Star Wars: The Last Jedi by John Williams (ISO score selections, splitted by tracks)

Star Wars: The Rise of Skywalker by John Williams (FYC)

 

It's a Star Wars Marathon!

 

Early Registration for Star Wars Half Marathon Starts ...

 

 

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The Rise of Skywalker FYC (x5) by John Williams - I can't predict when will the next time be, when I give a 10/10 to a film score again. I'm going to enjoy this one on-and-off for a good couple of months. And then it will become a Star Wars standard. 

It's a Wonderful Life by Dimitri Tiomkin - an archetype of a Christmas score. Heavily leaning on traditional tunes, and beautifully orchestrated.

The Song of Names by Howard Shore - boring

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50 minutes ago, publicist said:

 

You never heard THAT before? Almost an accomplishment...;)

Never had a chance to watch the film and every single album eluded me. I also had a sneaky suspicion this will be released again eventually.

 

It's great, by the way. But very different from what I expected.

 

Karol

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You know the wisdom of the ancients, every Goldsmith between 'Wind and the Lion' and 'Under Fire' is the real deal in its respective genre. Also, watch Crichton's movie some rainy winter afternoon, it's an entertaining romp with a lot of wit ('The French Connection' in victorian times, as Crichton labeled it).

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It's hard to believe this is from the same composer who wrote Capricorn One, Alien and Star Trek: The Motion Picture around the same time.

 

Those type of reissues, while probably redundant for many, are great for me because I get to fill some important gaps, finally. And judging by Neil's previous Goldsmith releases by Quartet, it was a safe buy. :)

 

Karol

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3 hours ago, crocodile said:

It's hard to believe this is from the same composer who wrote Capricorn One, Alien and Star Trek: The Motion Picture around the same time.

 

Those type of reissues, while probably redundant for many, are great for me because I get to fill some important gaps, finally. And judging by Neil's previous Goldsmith releases by Quartet, it was a safe buy. :)

 

Karol

 

Damn that sounds enticing! I remember reading the book when I was in high school, probably the closest thing Crichton had ever gotten to writing an actual novel. 

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Final Fantasy: The Spirits Within (2001) Elliot Goldenthal

This one definitely took a while to grow on me. Part of it has to do with the fact it's not motif driven in the traditional sense. They're definitely there, but it more sneaks up on you compared to other stuff I've heard. Really admired the orchestration and some of the grander moments this time around. Probably still not my favorite Goldenthal score currently, but it's certainly one of his best. Do prefer SonicAdventure's DE over the proper complete though. The added bits are nice enough, but I appreciate the flow of the album more.

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Quake (1996)Nine Inch Nails

One of the creepiest soundtracks I've ever listened to, and I keep returning to it even if it's not my favorite game score.
If you're wondering which one is, it's Martin Stig Andersen's Limbo.

 

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