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Harry Potter And The Deathly Hallows Part 1 by Alexandre Desplat


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The score is done and locked to picture, and it works marvelously well in it. Bitching about it is not going to change a damn thing now.

FUN THINGS TO DO AT JWFAN.COM

Bitch

Cleverly ask for unreleased music

chart.png

Q.E.D.

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Originally, you weren’t slated to score the second part of Hallows. What do you think sold the director David Yates on you wrapping up the saga?

My accent? You cannot really hear it when I write music.

What can we expect from your score to Harry’s finale? How many of the Hallows themes will crossover to the next film, and which new ones will be introduced?

I don’t know yet. I’ve still a long way to go.

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What can we expect from your score to Harry’s finale? How many of the Hallows themes will crossover to the next film, and which new ones will be introduced?

I don’t know yet. I’ve still a long way to go.

That is some kick-ass thematic construction right there ... :P

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There's something weird with his End Credits from JPIII. When the trumpet plays, he changes a note and it sounds really strange. But then the horn plays it normally, so... What the hell??

Interestingly, the trumpet is actually playing it...right. Sorta. The original conductor's score (and parts, presumably) for the Jurassic Park cue "To the Island" calls for that "wrong" note, but only for that first statement of the theme, as I recall. I don't know if this was a mistake made by Williams or John Neufeld (the orchestrator for that cue), or if it was actually originally intended to be that way. In any case, it obviously got changed in the recording studio for the original Jurassic Park. I'm guessing they went back and used that exact same score to record the JPIII credits, and they just never bothered to correct it. Sounds incredibly lame, I think.

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IMDB has posted some information on "My Love Is Always Here", one of the exclusive tracks on the DH:1 collector's set. Looks like it's a new choral song:

"My Love Is Always Here"

Written by Alexandre Desplat and Gerard McCann

Produced by Alexandre Desplat

Performed by London Voices

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0926084/soundtrack

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There's something weird with his End Credits from JPIII. When the trumpet plays, he changes a note and it sounds really strange. But then the horn plays it normally, so... What the hell??

Interestingly, the trumpet is actually playing it...right. Sorta. The original conductor's score (and parts, presumably) for the Jurassic Park cue "To the Island" calls for that "wrong" note, but only for that first statement of the theme, as I recall. I don't know if this was a mistake made by Williams or John Neufeld (the orchestrator for that cue), or if it was actually originally intended to be that way. In any case, it obviously got changed in the recording studio for the original Jurassic Park. I'm guessing they went back and used that exact same score to record the JPIII credits, and they just never bothered to correct it. Sounds incredibly lame, I think.

which bar in the score is that?

EDIT: Nevermind, I found it (b.42)

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What can we expect from your score to Harry’s finale? How many of the Hallows themes will crossover to the next film, and which new ones will be introduced?

I don’t know yet. I’ve still a long way to go.

That is some kick-ass thematic construction right there ... :P

But then again Howard Shore didn't know that either when he was composing LOTR scores or JW doing any film series. Besides, he doesn't clearly say "I haven't got any ideas". It is the only sensible thing one might say at this point. Remember he didn't even know he's doing the score until just recently (if he's indeed doing it). Desplat is capable of doing coherent scores with dense thematic material. In The Golden Compass he employed at least dozen of themes and planned to develop them further in the abandoned sequels. All of these themes had dark/light side to them too.

Karol

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What if Don Davis hadn't used the Williams themes for Jurassic Park 3?

Or what if Conti or Hamlish or Martin or Kamen hadn't used the Bond theme for their entries in the series? There is little doubt that Live And Let Die, For Your Eyes Only and License To Kill are vastly different in tone, and yet there is also little doubt that omitting the Bond elements would have been a bad move. All those films still have the same James Bond theme, and some generally Bondian elements, with the touch of the individual composer. Was that so freaking hard to realise on the Harry Potter series?

Can we deduce that David Yates just doesn't like Williams' music in his films? Let the letter bombs fly, i say!

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Actually I think JPIII might have benefited by letting Davis do his own thing.

And the HP films do continue to use Hedwig's theme, it doesn't have to be in your face every time. Williams toned down the Raiders march after TOD.

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Obviously.

And yet, you could argue that Ben's Theme was not made less prominent or dramatic during the final act of SW, or during TESB or ROTJ. Granted, even in death, Obi-Wan Kenobi remained a presence as both disembodied head and ghost, and his theme was expanded to represent the Force itself.

I'm not familiar enough with the HP franchise and scores to know if Hedwig's Theme represented anything more than Harry's owl, even though it became the "main theme" of the franchise itself.

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Still listening to this score. There's a lot to like. Cannot wait for the iTunes release with the extra tracks. I'm not forking $70 over for the Expanded Special Edition set because I just cannot rationalize it (although having an autographed music score is kinda cool).

I really do like the Williams styled tracks whether it's the floating string harmonies under the Hedwig's theme quote or the staggered trumpet accents in Sky Battle. It's very Williamsy moreso than Desplat indicates in his interviews.

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Yeah will that autographed music actually be autographed, or will it be a printed autograph? Can't imagine Desplat having much time to do that many autographs.

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I listened to it in better bitrate. A bit better but pales compared to Williams.

When all people can say is "I'm sure it fits the film perfectly", it's not exactly a ringing endorsement .For myself I listen to film scores for how it sounds on c.d. outside of the film

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When all people can say is "I'm sure it fits the film perfectly", it's not exactly a ringing endorsement .For myself I listen to film scores for how it sounds on c.d. outside of the film

Excuse me. I've listened to the soundtrack first and watched the finished scenes using Desplat's score -- his score is a fine listen separate from the film, and yet when seen in the film it's very effective.

If that isn't a ringing endorsement, then I don't know what is. It's not Williams, so you guys need to put that aside and embrace Desplat's score as a Desplat score, not Williams.

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That is not, and never was, the argument. The argument is that, as a Harry Potter score, DH was not very memorable.

If you can't separate "a Harry Potter score" from "a John Williams score", then this is either a sign that you probably need to sort things out as well, or that John Williams has done a pretty perfect job on these films.

Probably both.

As what else would I embrace this score if not as a Desplat score?

That's a very fishy argument, people aren't this biased.

Not even here.

"It works" may be a compliment for a composer who just graduated, but from people like Desplat, I expect something more.

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It's superb as a Harry Potter score.

DH was not very memorable.

You know. I tried to write out my thoughts on why Desplat's score is more than a worthy entry into the Harry Potter universe. But about an eigth of the way into the typing I read this sentence and realized it is a pointless undertaking.

I am sorry that your brain is incapable of discerning and recalling repeating patterns and ideas. Perhaps you ought to engage in some discourse with those who raised you as to what in your youth caused the abnormal functionality of that region of your brain. It is dubious that we can help you now though. The proverbial boat on that bit of brain development has long departed the dock.

If by now the score is not memorable or worthy to you, please do make an exit from this thread, and join us in the conversation of the movie, as I'm sure you are a Harry Potter fan and will be watching the movie, regardless of the unworthy unmemorable lump of music Desplat has turned in. We will make sure to mark our record books with qkgyver's immense disdain and disappointment with the unmemorable and unworthy score by Alexandre Desplat of France for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part I, directed by David Yates and funded and distributed by Warner Bros. and based on a best-selling novel by J.K. Rowling.

Still listening to this score. There's a lot to like. Cannot wait for the iTunes release with the extra tracks. I'm not forking $70 over for the Expanded Special Edition set because I just cannot rationalize it (although having an autographed music score is kinda cool).

I really do like the Williams styled tracks whether it's the floating string harmonies under the Hedwig's theme quote or the staggered trumpet accents in Sky Battle. It's very Williamsy moreso than Desplat indicates in his interviews.

Indeed. My only real gripe with the score is the muffled mixing of it. I thought it was the low bit rate, but even at higher qualities it still sounds rather like the album has a cold.

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I listened to it in better bitrate. A bit better but pales compared to Williams.

When all people can say is "I'm sure it fits the film perfectly", it's not exactly a ringing endorsement .For myself I listen to film scores for how it sounds on c.d. outside of the film

It's a film score. Its job first and foremost is to serve the film with both emotional depth and creative energy. Judging it outside of that medium is stupid and invalidates any opinion you have of it as far as I'm concerned. You act as if Williams is a god who simply composes the greatest music known to man, but in fact he does film music. He refuses to do animated movies because he writes his scores to the images, so to judge something wholly without seeing it as it is intended is an idiotic reason. Is it better than Williams' scores, I doubt it; but without seeing it in its proper setting you really can't cite the effectiveness of the score.

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Exactly. As fans, we might focus more on the music than on the film, or even ignore the film altogether, but that has no bearing on this very important fact: the film composer's job is to compose music that will serve the film. Not music that will stand alone beautifully or music that will work well on album. We obviously hope for those things, as do most film composers, and they may be far more important to us personally, but that's not what being a film composer is about.

That being said, I'm still waiting till I see the film to listen to the music, so I can't make any judgments on this specific score. ;)

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It's a film score. Its job first and foremost is to serve the film with both emotional depth and creative energy. Judging it outside of that medium is stupid and invalidates any opinion you have of it as far as I'm concerned. You act as if Williams is a god who simply composes the greatest music known to man, but in fact he does film music.

This seems a little ignorant... Film music may be written for a film, but that doesn't mean it must be appreciated more as a part of that film than as a work of music isolated from the film. I'm sure plenty of people listen to Tchaikovsky's 6th Symphony without knowing it was intended as a suicide note (assuming it was). Are their opinions "stupid and invalid" because they aren't aware of how effective the work is in achieving its initial goal? In fact, I challenge you to find a piece of music that isn't existing for some purpose, be it evoking a mood or telling a story, and then to call its fans or critics stupid if they aren't aware of said purpose. I'd go as far as to say that your suggestion that film music isn't eligible for being "the greatest music known to man" is borderline offensive to all those who take part in the art. And perhaps that was poor wording and not what you intended to communicate, but your post definitely suggests that film music is functional first, artistic second. And that bothers me.

He refuses to do animated movies because he writes his scores to the images

;) I'd be curious of the following:

1. Where you heard that?

2. What you consider Tintin to be?

3. How animated films lack "images"?

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And perhaps that was poor wording and not what you intended to communicate, but your post definitely suggests that film music is functional first, artistic second. And that bothers me.

It may bother you, but it's the truth. ;) I'm all for composers going above and beyond to create something that works really well outside of the film - that's generally the stuff I listen to ;) - but that's not the job. The job is to create music to support what the filmmakers are doing. Period.

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And perhaps that was poor wording and not what you intended to communicate, but your post definitely suggests that film music is functional first, artistic second. And that bothers me.

It may bother you, but it's the truth. ;) I'm all for composers going above and beyond to create something that works really well outside of the film - that's generally the stuff I listen to ;) - but that's not the job. The job is to create music to support what the filmmakers are doing. Period.

I disagree. I'm not saying this aspect should be completely ignored, but I don't think it should be the only factor - I don't even think it should be the main factor - in determing quality. Like I was saying earlier, I don't heard much "suicide note" in Tchaikovsky's 6th Symphony, but I still love it - does that mean my opinion is "stupid and invalid" (and I realize you weren't the one making attacks against those who disagreed with you, this is partly for Wycket).

Here's another example - take any piece of music that was comissioned for a specific idea or event. When you listen to these pieces, do you rate them based on how well they capture this idea, or do you just forget about the comission and enjoy them/not enjoy them as a piece of classical music?

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I'm not talking about determining the quality of the music, exactly. I'm talking about whether the composer has done his/her job. My favorite scores are obviously the ones that I like listening to on their own, and although most of them fit their films perfectly, that's not what I look for. But it's what the composer has to be focused on, or else they're out of a job. KM said it's not a ringing endorsement to say that a score fits its film, and while that doesn't necessarily indicate quality, it certainly indicates that the composer has done the job.

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I'm not talking about determining the quality of the music, exactly. I'm talking about whether the composer has done his/her job. My favorite scores are obviously the ones that I like listening to on their own, and although most of them fit their films perfectly, that's not what I look for. But it's what the composer has to be focused on, or else they're out of a job. KM said it's not a ringing endorsement to say that a score fits its film, and while that doesn't necessarily indicate quality, it certainly indicates that the composer has done the job.

I agree with you here. However, I think that as film score fans we are looking for something that does more than fit the film. To me, it seemed like KM's post was arguing that at best, the score is merely functional - it may work within the film, but beyond that it won't be anything special (I don't necessarily agree, as I haven't even heard the score yet)--but I think that is a reason to be dissapointed. And I certainly don't think it's an invalid opinion just because it hasn't been given in context of the film.

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I agree that it's a valid reason to be less interested in listening to the score. My point was simply that from the composer's vantage point, the number-one goal has to be serving the director's vision. If what the director wants is a score that's bland outside the context of the film, that's what the director is gonna need to get, even though it'll turn off film score fans like us.

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I agree that it's a valid reason to be less interested in listening to the score. My point was simply that from the composer's vantage point, the number-one goal has to be serving the director's vision. If what the director wants is a score that's bland outside the context of the film, that's what the director is gonna need to get, even though it'll turn off film score fans like us.

I know this is self evident but I am still going to say it: The blandness or greatness of a film score is very much in the ears and mind of each individual listener. A film composer is always a collaborator and these days of even more restricted range as there is usually a legion of studio people involved in supervising that the music fulfills their needs above those of the director. I am sure every composer does his/her best each and every time but the results may wary. Sometimes the music becomes its own creature and works splendidly on its own and sometimes it supports the context for which it was written but stays behind the scenes adding nuances to the story but does not offer a strong impression on its own. Again this is for each and everyone of us to decide. It does not bar heated discussion which I support strongly as discussion usually offers new views on any subject and lets you see the other side of the coin or the many other ways to look at things.

Film music as all music is a complex phenomenon even on the listener's side. What affects the impressions and feeling one gets from music is a whole group of different preconceptions and views.

How familiar the music is,

how challenging or accessible it is,

what is the state of mind in which you listen a composition,

when and where do you listen to it,

do you know the context or feel emotionally connected to it or is it irrelevant,

does the music have certain qualities you absolutely admire or hate,

what are the expectations for the music,

does the music appeal to you emotionally,

does the music appeal to your intellect,

what kind of ideas do you associate with the composition in general,

do you have prejudice or bias towards the composer/artist.

And that is only a short and broad list of things that might affect the way you perceive any piece of music. Truly there is no formula by which you could calculate the greatness or blandness of any music. E.g. others prefer and demand immediate impact from music for it to be good in their opinion and others find that the more you listen to a piece of music the more you understand it and the more it can reveal. It is all a personal perception of what is and what isn't good music. And these perceptions and ideas about music is what is fascinating to share with other people whether they reject your notions or agree with them. Sometimes you learn to see a piece of music differently and even appreciate it and sometimes you don't but others views are interesting none the less.

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All VERY true statements, Incanus. Thanks for making that point. ;) At the end of the day, it's all just vibrations in the air causing cells in our ears to wiggle back and forth, triggering intricate patterns of electrical signals that work their way back to the brain to be processed. If one person's brain processes the information in such a way that (s)he gets more pleasure signals firing, who's to say that's wrong or right?

(Sorry, I'm studying hearing right now for an exam tomorrow... ;))

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It's superb as a Harry Potter score.

DH was not very memorable.

You know. I tried to write out my thoughts on why Desplat's score is more than a worthy entry into the Harry Potter universe. But about an eigth of the way into the typing I read this sentence and realized it is a pointless undertaking.

I am sorry that your brain is incapable of discerning and recalling repeating patterns and ideas. Perhaps you ought to engage in some discourse with those who raised you as to what in your youth caused the abnormal functionality of that region of your brain. It is dubious that we can help you now though. The proverbial boat on that bit of brain development has long departed the dock.

If by now the score is not memorable or worthy to you, please do make an exit from this thread, and join us in the conversation of the movie, as I'm sure you are a Harry Potter fan and will be watching the movie, regardless of the unworthy unmemorable lump of music Desplat has turned in. We will make sure to mark our record books with qkgyver's immense disdain and disappointment with the unmemorable and unworthy score by Alexandre Desplat of France for Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows Part I, directed by David Yates and funded and distributed by Warner Bros. and based on a best-selling novel by J.K. Rowling.

Still listening to this score. There's a lot to like. Cannot wait for the iTunes release with the extra tracks. I'm not forking $70 over for the Expanded Special Edition set because I just cannot rationalize it (although having an autographed music score is kinda cool).

I really do like the Williams styled tracks whether it's the floating string harmonies under the Hedwig's theme quote or the staggered trumpet accents in Sky Battle. It's very Williamsy moreso than Desplat indicates in his interviews.

Indeed. My only real gripe with the score is the muffled mixing of it. I thought it was the low bit rate, but even at higher qualities it still sounds rather like the album has a cold.

You just sound like another one of those Desplat fanboys on this board ;). Please write true arguments and stop go the dirty way by insulting someones brain or something like that... Is this score not worth it to think about it a little and find arguments that either support or criticize it?

I have to agree with qkgyver, of course. This is an unmemorable even often boring score on the OST. I argumented it, read my other posts. No one has provided better arguments in response to prove me wrong. The only thing i got were insults from Koray. Well, i have to be right somehow, proven by drawing the anger of the Desplat fanboys on me ;)

And how shall the fact that Desplat composes it have anything to do with appreciation. In the end just the quality of the music counts. It suceeds in orchestration, but fails hard in memorability, continuity and listenabilty as an album.

I know that Desplat employs at least four different motives and he develops them, but they are all so unmemorable and average that it doesnt help. It still sounds like good underscore.

And i'm no Harry Potter fan (but i will watch the movie) . I'm just interested in the huge possibilities they provide for great (also listenable apart the movie) filmmusic. So that is my concern

By the way, good post incanus. It's just that true masterpieces usually satisfy all these groups and worse scores loose them one after another. Even if there are people who love a bad score it still will be regarded bad if the majority doesn't.

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I agree that it's a valid reason to be less interested in listening to the score. My point was simply that from the composer's vantage point, the number-one goal has to be serving the director's vision. If what the director wants is a score that's bland outside the context of the film, that's what the director is gonna need to get, even though it'll turn off film score fans like us.

I know this is self evident but I am still going to say it: The blandness or greatness of a film score is very much in the ears and mind of each individual listener. A film composer is always a collaborator and these days of even more restricted range as there is usually a legion of studio people involved in supervising that the music fulfills their needs above those of the director. I am sure every composer does his/her best each and every time but the results may wary. Sometimes the music becomes its own creature and works splendidly on its own and sometimes it supports the context for which it was written but stays behind the scenes adding nuances to the story but does not offer a strong impression on its own. Again this is for each and everyone of us to decide. It does not bar heated discussion which I support strongly as discussion usually offers new views on any subject and lets you see the other side of the coin or the many other ways to look at things.

Film music as all music is a complex phenomenon even on the listener's side. What affects the impressions and feeling one gets from music is a whole group of different preconceptions and views.

How familiar the music is,

..................

does the music appeal to your intellect,

what kind of ideas do you associate with the composition in general,

do you have prejudice or bias towards the composer/artist.

And that is only a short and broad list of things that might affect the way you perceive any piece of music. Truly there is no formula by which you could calculate the greatness or blandness of any music. E.g. others prefer and demand immediate impact from music for it to be good in their opinion and others find that the more you listen to a piece of music the more you understand it and the more it can reveal. It is all a personal perception of what is and what isn't good music. And these perceptions and ideas about music is what is fascinating to share with other people whether they reject your notions or agree with them. Sometimes you learn to see a piece of music differently and even appreciate it and sometimes you don't but others views are interesting none the less.

Couldn't have put it better Mikko. In fact this is the precise reason why I've always considered those 'best of' lists that come out every year (naming Star wars as the greatest score of all time, and failing to recognise film music written after 1980), a load of total bullcrap. If I said that I think Spartacus is a lame score, I'd get plenty of rotten eggs thrown, but in truth, I don't listen to it because it does nothing for me emotionally, not because I think it's badly composed.

So back to Potter, I was prepared with this score to put aside some reservations about Desplat (I've never liked his restrained, quietly rhythmic sound) to see what he came up with for this score. I do still have reservations, but I enjoy it for what it is.

The problem here isn't people disagreeing about the quality of the music. It's failing to recognise the opposite viewpoint as legitimate (i.e. calling someone names because they think the score is good) that's causing all the problems.

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I just came from a press screening of this film, which has the official Norwegian premiere later tonight. Not the 3D version, though.

It was OK, but I've never really been a big fan of the franchise in the first place. For some reason, the Harry Potter fan club had managed to get seats for the press screening too, so the theatre was filled with 14-year-olds cheering, applauding, laughing and crying (especially in one particular scene towards the end).

Desplat's music is quite disappointing. A few nice passages (there's one that recalls Mahler's 5th at some point), but his ostinato-based action music is incredibly boring. Plus much of it is drowned out by über-loud sound effects (I had to use ear plugs on several occasions!). I'm going to write an article on the music of the Potter saga soon, so I'm set to re-watch all films and listen more carefully to all scores. Maybe Desplat's score works better alone, we'll see.

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WARNING: Big time Desplat "fanboy" here (though I prefer referring to it as a man-crush)...

To judge this score as a standalone piece of music is completely fair, as Desplat has explicitly stated that this is always one of his goals. Of course he's serving the film, as all good composers do. But in my opinion, worthy film scores are worth judging on their own merits. And in this case, the artist agrees.

Having said that, I think it's an incredibly moving score. Singularly Desplat, while also channeling Williams' recent style with amazing reverence. Memorable themes, colorful orchestration, and many aching, poignant moments. It is both grandly symphonic and surprisingly intimate. I realize that not everyone loves Desplat's elegant method of writing, but I firmly believe that he is writing the best film music among all of today's active film composers—and Harry Potter is further proof of that.

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Hmmm let's look at a summary of the arguments for and against this score:

1. The detractors use adjectives like "boring" to put forth their position

2. The advocates have included specific music examples and have appeared to be more objective in their description of why they enjoy the score.

I dunno guys but I think some of the pro-Desplat people have Bern reduced to some heated verbiage because the people who don't like the score are ignoring some pretty articulate posts about the merits of this score and sticking firmly in the camp of fluffy adjectives or faux philosophy, neither of which is going to convince the supporters to change their position.

I guess the only thing left to say is to those of you who clearly don't like it. Why rain on the parade of those who do on this thread? Do you guys just like to stir up people when clearly you don't like Desplat's attempt?

My only criticism is that I fear Desplat occasionally is too self conscious of his Potter/Williams obligations in this score and didn't go his own route like he should have.

There is tons of nods to Williams throughout this score in terms if his stylistic mannerisms but you guys cannot hear it because you obviously expect straight quotes from Williams' scores which wouldn't make Desplat any more distinct than an over-glorified orchestrator like Ken Thorne on Superman 2, a score that is emotionally and artistically bankrupt.

Do perhaps I can suggest you start a new thread called "Desplat sucks" so those if us who like what he did can steer clear and all you naysayers can have a nice little pessimistic dialogue about him.

To me, Desplat is one of the sole reasons I'm still even interested in film score collecting do obviously you know where I stand.

Sorry my last post was written on my stupid iPod with it's dumbass spell correction..,

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I just came from a press screening of this film, which has the official Norwegian premiere later tonight. Not the 3D version, though.

Warner Brothers said three weeks ago that they weren't able to secure a "quality" 3D conversion for Part 1, so they abandoned that and are releasing it in 2D. Only Part 2 will be converted into 3D.

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You just sound like another one of those Desplat fanboys on this board ;). Please write true arguments and stop go the dirty way by insulting someones brain or something like that... Is this score not worth it to think about it a little and find arguments that either support or criticize it?

Don't bother arguing. Democracy on this board means nothing but blocking out the unwanted.

I have to agree with qkgyver, of course. This is an unmemorable even often boring score on the OST. I argumented it, read my other posts. No one has provided better arguments in response to prove me wrong. The only thing i got were insults from Koray. Well, i have to be right somehow, proven by drawing the anger of the Desplat fanboys on me :lol:

And how shall the fact that Desplat composes it have anything to do with appreciation. In the end just the quality of the music counts. It suceeds in orchestration, but fails hard in memorability, continuity and listenabilty as an album.

I know that Desplat employs at least four different motives and he develops them, but they are all so unmemorable and average that it doesnt help. It still sounds like good underscore.

You see (surprisingly to all the people here), I have to disagree there.

Deathly Hallows may fail greatly in memorability, in continuity, and certainly in qualitative comparison to Williams, but certainly not as a listening experience.

The small motifs Desplat employs keep your attention up, and the emotional passages may be a bit simplistic sometimes, but you still feel something genuine there; you don't feel like you are being "forced" into the emotion, like in Doyle's score or Hooper's HBP.

It's just that pretty much the whole thing sounds like good underscore that someone forgot to layer the memorable thematic material on top of.

The second half of the album is not quite as strong in listenability as the first, mainly because Desplat's action scoring doesn't quite touch me.

It's a good score, in parts very good and catchy, but the key word is still "memorability".

It's superb as a Harry Potter score.

What an insightful post. You should run your own review site!

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Sorry but I dislike the fall-back position of the "freedom of speech" entitlement. Yes, everyone should be allowed to voice their opinion. But when they keep on about the same thing from post to post not offering anything new to the thread, especially when it's clear about their position, it seems excessive and not constructive.

For me, if I see a thread on Brian Tyler or Tyler Bates or Hans Zimmer, I mostly avoid it these days. What's the point of chiming in merely to say "this sucks" or "there's no theme". Am I entitled to posting it? Yes. Does it add anything of value to the thread or this forum? No. so what is the point? To rile people who do like whatever the score is pretty much or generally get attention.

Blumenkohl and I have had surely had some debates on this forum so I'm not siding with him because we're all good friends- I totally agree with his position because he's presented some very well thought out ideas- posts which gkgyver edited down to a single quote which completely misrepresents Blumenkohl's stance. Sorry but you're not going to win any debate points by hacking up someone's position to a single sentence out of all the exposition they have gone to the trouble of articulating.

gkgyver, YES, we get it. You don't like Desplat's themes. Fine, move on if you will. What I really find perverse about this thread in particular is that the people defending Desplat are resorting to the same desperate means that people defend Zimmer and R-C scores. I can't say whether the score works in the film because I haven't seen it yet. For me, it works as a pure listening experience. I keep getting something new out of each listen. It's not easily digestible upon its first or second listening. Like real art, it's layered and there is a lot of finesse and subtlety there. I still think Desplat might have been too faithful to Williams' approach in some cues but largely I think he was quite successful at providing a mature, evolved score for this franchise rather than a 1 dimensional effort. Of course this is my opinion and others will debate it by I stand firmly by it.

As Seinfeld said once "okay you guys have been great, I'm outta here" [at least for this thread]

Cheers!

David

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