Jump to content

What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Older Films)


Mr. Breathmask
 Share

Recommended Posts

6 hours ago, Alexcremers said:

Isn't that always the case with you, Richard?

It is true that my taste in films, music, etc., can go "against the grain", but I stand by my choices. It's what I like. No more, and, certainty, no less.

 

 

5 hours ago, Quintus said:

It bothers Alex because he traditionally liked to portray him as the minority here.

So...Lee, are you saying that Alex wants to be the only gay, in the village? :lol:

At my age, I'm not bothered if I'm in a minority, or not.

I'm an advocate of being true to oneself. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

.. are you saying that Alex wants to be the only gay, in the village? :lol:

At my age, I'm not bothered if I'm in a minority, or not.

I'm an advocate of being true to oneself. 

 

Perhaps not by JWFan members, but in the world outside, my tastes are shared by many. I won't dislike something merely because something is popular.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Joker

 

s-l500.jpg

 

That has to be the weakest presentation of the Wayne murder in the history of Wayne murder presentations. Other than that, what can I say that hasn't already been said? 7/10

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Alexcremers said:

Joker

 

s-l500.jpg

 

That has to be the weakest presentation of the Wayne murder in the history of Wayne murders presentations. Other than that, what can I say that hasn't already been said? 7/10

 

Wait, does he kill Batman's parents in this movie?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Þekþiþm said:

 

Wait, does he kill Batman's parents in this movie?

 

Eh, I don't want to give any spoilers. :mrgreen:

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Quintus said:

I already added it to my "films I'll never see" list. 

 

Anyone else bored beyond belief with edgy cinema? 


I’m by no means enamored with this film, but you should consider watching it. If nothing else, the execution is really strong.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, Quintus said:

I already added it to my "films I'll never see" list. 

 

Anyone else bored beyond belief with edgy cinema? 


'89 - Jack Nicholson has what looks very much like the time of his life playing Bats' most famous nemesis. 

'19 - Joaquin Phoenix stars in a miserable origin story, a key theme of which is how society treats those with mental illness.  

Ain't progress *wonderful*? 

 

 The Thing (1982) - John Carpenter's 'base under siege' sci-fi horror classic, in which the team at an Antarctic research station battle against an alien parasite that can 'hide' within people/animals. Fair to say it's famed for the astonishing-for-the-time practical creature/gore effects.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

 

51 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

If nothing else, the execution is really strong.

 

Except for the presentation of 'the Wayne murder'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Sweeping Strings said:

The Thing (1982) - John Carpenter's 'base under siege' sci-fi horror classic, in which the team at an Antarctic research station battle against an alien parasite that can 'hide' within people/animals. Fair to say it's famed for the astonishing-for-the-time practical creature/gore effects.

It's also a brilliant comment on isolation, and cold-war paranoia.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Quintus said:

I already added it to my "films I'll never see" list. 

 

Anyone else bored beyond belief with edgy cinema? 

Absolutely

It's all either Fincher-lite, Scorsese-lite, or Kubrick-lite.  Maybe with some "wAcKy pLoT tWiStS" thrown in in an attempt to give it some character.   

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 minutes ago, Not Mr. Big said:

Absolutely

It's all either Fincher-lite, Scorsese-lite, or Kubrick-lite.  

 

What's the alternative? Marvel? Safe & clean Tom Hanks vehicles? Rewatching Jaws for the umteenth time? I dunno ...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 hours ago, Quintus said:

Anyone else bored beyond belief with edgy cinema? 

 

I liked Joker, but yeah, count me in in the club of the bored with edgy cinema.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/1/2020 at 8:41 AM, Naïve Old Fart said:

It's also a brilliant comment on isolation, and cold-war paranoia.

Its a prime example of film excess. As Dr. MALCOLM  says just because you can do it doesn't mean you should. 

I will always prefer the 50's Thing from Another World. It is not as bleak, almost as paranoid, and the sexual banter is far more entertaining.

 

Watched 47 meters Down Uncaged. B film fluff. Thank goodness I didn't pay to see it in the theatre.

 

Midway. A damn enjoyable movie about the greatest most important battle of WWII involving the US. It changed the course of the War. 

 

Ford vs Ferrari. I really enjoyed this and Bale was terrific. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/1/2020 at 11:00 AM, Edmilson said:

I liked Joker, but yeah, count me in in the club of the bored with edgy cinema.

What does edgy cinema mean exactly? Can you provide some other examples?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Really? I don't think Snyder's all that edgy. He's just muddled and middling.

 

4 hours ago, JoeinAR said:

Midway. A damn enjoyable movie about the greatest most important battle of WWII involving the US. It changed the course of the War. 

 

U-571 changed it more though. The movie which actually cracked the enigma code.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

23 minutes ago, Quintus said:

Really? I don't think Snyder's all that edgy. He's just muddled and middling.

 

 

U-571 changed it more though. The movie which actually cracked the engima code.

Midway was more important for the United States.  Had the US lost Midway our involvement in Europe would be seriously delayed. The war would have raged on longer. But they broke the Japanese code and determined it was Midway. Even knowing that it took a lot of luck to win the battle. They had a 4 to 1 advantage. Fortunately there was no way the jerry's or Japanese could break the us code

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Image result for the ghost writer poster

 

The Ghost Writer (2010) 

I saw this one on Vudu and the poster/cast intrigued me so I went in knowing nothing about it.  A few minutes in, I looked up who directed it and Polanski figures, as it is not too dissimilar a movie from his 1988 effort Frantic.  Slow burn suspense is the name of the game here as Ewan McGregor plays an unnamed everyman who takes a ghostwriting assignment for Pierce Brosnan's character, an ex-British PM modeled after Tony Blair , after the original writer dies in suspicious circumstances.  

It is a well-directed movie, though not very near the problematic director's best efforts. I take issue also at the world of the film, where the ex-PM finds himself in trouble for something that pretty much goes on all the time in the real world and does not produce quite the international crisis and outrage Polanski seems to think should follow.  Predictably, the U.S. government/ C.I.A. emerges as the villains, but Polanski avoids stark black/white dynamics for the most part.  

 While the movie does feel like it is going through the motions at times, the performances, cinematography, and very witty and twisty screenplay hold it together nicely.  Computer generated backgrounds are used sometimes, but somehow they feel like the old matte stuff in similar Golden Age suspense flicks.  

Desplat's score is forgettable.  

A solid movie, held back by some flaws.

3/4

Also, I re-watched WarGames just because. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Caught some great stuff lately (quick take):

 

5 stars

The Last Black Man in San Fransisco (2019)

Wasn't sure what to expect, but this was something special. Perhaps one of 2019's best. Lovely cinematography, score, heartfelt story. 

 

Silence (2016)

Takes on the very definition of "thought-provoking". Utterly sublime. Been meaning to rewatch this and I'm pretty sure it's one of my favourites of the decade. 

 

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007)

Schnabel's films continue to find a way to speak to something at my very core...wow.

 

Prisoners (2013)

The 39 Steps (1935)

Chinatown (1974)

 

4 stars

The Wrong Man (1954)

The Lighthouse (2019)

Dances With Wolves (1990)

 

3 stars 

A Ghost Story (2016)

Easy Rider (1973)

Togo (2019) 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

5 minutes ago, The Illustrious Jerry said:

Silence (2016)

Takes on the very definition of "thought-provoking". Utterly sublime. Been meaning to rewatch this and I'm pretty sure it's one of my favourites of the decade. 

My best and my most unpleasant cinema experience ever.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 3/3/2020 at 5:30 AM, Quintus said:

Really? I don't think Snyder's all that edgy. He's just muddled and middling.

 

 

U-571 changed it more though. The movie which actually cracked the enigma code.

I watched a few scenes from BvS the other day on Youtube and actually got a bit nostalgic for Snyder's brand of epic. He's fun. Legend of the Guardians is great

6 hours ago, The Illustrious Jerry said:

Caught some great stuff lately (quick take):

 

5 stars

The Last Black Man in San Fransisco (2019)

Wasn't sure what to expect, but this was something special. Perhaps one of 2019's best. Lovely cinematography, score, heartfelt story. 

 

Silence (2016)

Takes on the very definition of "thought-provoking". Utterly sublime. Been meaning to rewatch this and I'm pretty sure it's one of my favourites of the decade. 

 

The Diving Bell and the Butterfly (2007)

Schnabel's films continue to find a way to speak to something at my very core...wow.

 

Prisoners (2013)

The 39 Steps (1935)

Chinatown (1974)

 

4 stars

The Wrong Man (1954)

The Lighthouse (2019)

Dances With Wolves (1990)

 

3 stars 

A Ghost Story (2016)

Easy Rider (1973)

Togo (2019) 

I think Silence is one of my favourites full-stop. What an incredible movie. 

 

Loved the score for Last Black Man, really must get onto watching it

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Image result for the color of money scorsese

 

The Color Of Money (1986)

Solid movie that benefits from Scorsese's slick touch, and some fantastic performances.  Newman, Cruise, and Mastrantonio own the screen when they are on it.

But, the movie makes a late shift in focus from the established trio to focus just on Newman, with Crusie and Mastrantonio returning not long after changed, but without much payoff.  

Scorsese is obviously trying to do something different than the standard three act bullet points, but I'm not sure it works as well as he might have intended.  

3/4

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I like its ambitions and some of the things it tries.. But it just ultimately falls short and feels a little lost.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 8/6/2011 at 3:24 AM, Jilal said:

I saw E.T. yesterday. What a wonderful film. Truly magical. There were a few things in the film that dissapointed me though. Why did the NASA guys dress up as astronauts just to get ET? That was strange. And there wasn't even a credit for John Williams in the end credits! There was one for Herbert Spencer though. How strange. I also think the broadcasting company cut a few scenes out. Sometimes the music stopped really abruptly.

They are bio-hazard suits.  

 

And everyone knows Spencer wrote the score.  Williams was too busy with the BPO in those days.  

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Romeo + Juliet (1996)

 

This film made a huge impression on me when I saw it on TV as a young boy, but I didn't revisit it - until a few days ago, when the prologue came up in my Youtube recommendations, so I decided to give the film another watch. Something about Luhrmann's sense of drama really resonates with me. I think a major factor is the music used in the film - every track seems perfectly tailored to the action on screen (and vice versa). And there are so many shots which just stick with you and which aren't easy to get out of your mind.

 

I'm going to have to watch The Great Gatsby now...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Legend (Ridley Scott, 1985)

 

This gave me a flashback to our latest Prometheus/narrative vs. visuals discussion, and its another Ridley Scott film, to boot. As far as I was concerned, it was nearly two-hours of a masterful, painterly, gorgeous feast for the eyes...and nearly two-hours of absolute, unadultered, unbridled, uninhibited...NOTHING.

 

We have an antagonist who wants to put the world under perpetual night, a protagonist and a damsel-in-distress. Trouble is, the quest to rescue the damsel (y'know, the plot) doesn't begin until halfway through; the antagonist doesn't become aware that he has a damsel in his grasp until such time as he reappears, which is two-thirds (!) into the movie, and upon doing so, he becomes smitten with her. The protagonist seems completely unaware of who his opponent is, and for his part the villain doesn't learn of the hero's existence until their "climactic" fight, and never learns of his interest in the damsel. Its all just wasted opportunities for actual, personal conflict.

 

Other than the trifle of a storyline and character, its elegantly directed and mostly well-performed: on the one hand, we have a young Tom Cruise who's clearly yet to unlock his talent as a lead, but on the other we have Tim Curry as a very memorable villain. But its nonetheless a dead film. A beautiful, cinematic stillborn. Ugh.

 

**1/2 out of *****

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The script of 'Legend' is fine, only that Scott directs his actors like they were stills in a drawing and ends up with strange ciphers. The clueless editing is the final nail in the coffin and after the first 20 minutes you wonder what everyone was after. It's a really strange beast and even with the JG score a masterful achievement in itself, i halfway understand Universal's yearning to fuck around with it.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

22 minutes ago, Þekþiþm said:

Pretty pictures.

 

Mainly in the beginning. But it looks ugly and boring at the end (climax) when there was no more money.

 

 

9 hours ago, Chen G. said:

Legend (Ridley Scott, 1985)

 

This gave me a flashback to our latest Prometheus/narrative vs. visuals discussion, and its another Ridley Scott film, to boot. As far as I was concerned, it was nearly two-hours of a masterful, painterly, gorgeous feast for the eyes...and nearly two-hours of absolute, unadultered, unbridled, uninhibited...NOTHING.

 

 

I haven't seen the DC but I remember thinking there was no sense of journey. A lack of story. There's no time and distance between the scenes.  It's the shorthand version of LOTR. 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.