Jump to content
King Mark

What Is The Last Film You Watched? (Newer films)

Recommended Posts

8 minutes ago, Þekþiþm said:

 

Ah. It seems to be making a comeback.

 

Greta Gerwig said that Spielberg convinced her to shoot Little Women on celluloid. 

 

It really does make a difference.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There were moments during Godzilla: King of the Monsters (digitally shot) at the cinema where I could have sworn it was film stock, but I might attribute that to the anamorphic distortions and lack-of-sharpness issues inherent within that process.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In film, shooting anamorphic basically allows you to compress more detail unto the filmstock. In digital, the amount of detail is governed entirely by the pixel-count (minus filtering loses, of course).

 

The only distinction is that there's no need for cropping, and of course any cropping then requires blowing the picture back up, so there is a loss of detail. But then, the kind of anamorphics they use on these cameras requires horizontal cropping, too.

 

Besides, spherical looks more naturalistic and since these cameras give you lots of detail to begin with, its gradually becoming the better option.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just saw last year’s Shazam! Pretty great fun! I thought they could have done better with realizing the Seven Deadly Enemies of Man; they seemed kind of generic. But great performances and lots of heart without too much boring bang-crash.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
22 minutes ago, Chen G. said:

Besides, spherical looks more naturalistic and since these cameras give you lots of detail to begin with, its gradually becoming the better option.

 

Sure, but spherical doesn't yield those oval-shaped bokeh balls and other weird movie-like distortions like warped heads and elongated objects that's so distinct in anamorphic cinematography. Filmmakers obviously dig it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1917. It was a fine film and very nice to watch but I also find it to be emotionally flat. That is perhaps, ironically, because its accomplishments as a piece of filmmaking. As the result it becomes more impressive as a technical achievement rather than meaningful and affecting story. It's a bit of a gimmick and that cheapens any message behind this concept. As a war film, it might be a bit of a failure but still a really solid "movie experience".

 

Thomas Newman's score was a disappointment except for two cues (you know which ones).

 

Karol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Quintus said:

Probably needed a night time camp scene in a church where one of the characters blabbers on about nothing for five minutes but by the time he dies later you suddenly care.

Actually it is very much like that film. Pretty much exactly. And they both have that problem.

 

Karol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Quintus said:

 

Contrived feelz are the worst.

 

Sure, but that is not the real problem with Mendes' film. It's the fact I've been thinking of "oh wow cool shot" or "how did they do that?" rather than being invested in anything happening on the screen.

 

Karol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
24 minutes ago, Naïve Old Fart said:

Does the whole "one shot" idea work, or would the film be better served by more "traditional" storytelling?

It does work as a spectacle, sure. Does it go beyond that? Not so sure.

 

Karol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A Hidden Life

 

This was on its way out with one showing available at my local theater. Glad I was finally able to catch it.

 

It’s certainly Malick’s best film since 2011, with a return to more traditional story structure. Even so, it doesn’t really nail that sweet combination of nature, philosophy, and human condition, that his earlier films executed so well. Howard’s score was great, but I kept thinking it would lead into a passage from The Village. I wouldn’t have minded if Malick just straight reused that score, since the melodies are so similar. 
 

Cinematography is excellent, as expected, and the wide shots are breathtaking. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Me and the missus were planning to go and see 1917 this afternoon. That was until she brought up the website for our local Odeon - £15 each! Hahaha! THIRTY QUID for a couple to go and see a movie. Yeah right! 

 

And cinema chains wonder why they're struggling.

 

Netflix it is then!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Sweeping Strings said:

That's insane ... Belfast Odeon is £7.25 for online booking and £6.50 at the box-office (£9.25/£8.50 for the 'Premier' seats).  

 

You guys are lucky, here there's a 10% fee for online booking. So, a ticket that costs 14 reais are sold by 15.40 reais. That's why I very rarely buy tickets online for cinema.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, Quintus said:

Me and the missus were planning to go and see 1917 this afternoon. That was until she brought up the website for our local Odeon - £15 each! Hahaha! THIRTY QUID for a couple to go and see a movie. Yeah right! 

 

And cinema chains wonder why they're struggling.

 

Netflix it is then!

 

That's ridiculous. Luckily only paid $12 in comparison, because it was thankfully not a 3D movie.

 

With that said, I do suggest finding a way to watch it on the big screen. It's worth it.

 

7 hours ago, Koray Savas said:

A Hidden Life

 

This was on its way out with one showing available at my local theater. Glad I was finally able to catch it.

 

It’s certainly Malick’s best film since 2011, with a return to more traditional story structure. Even so, it doesn’t really nail that sweet combination of nature, philosophy, and human condition, that his earlier films executed so well. 

 

I agree that it wasn't as ambitious in its scope as his earlier films, but I found it to say beautiful things about faith, ego, surrender and speaks to Malick's belief in the inherent "goodness" of the human condition. One of my favourite films of the year.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just saw it (1917) after arriving in Vienna. Understand the criticism about it being ,affect‘ cinema - a few typical movie conventions too many - but it’s still engrossing in a way only movies can offer. I just wish Mendes would have second or third drafted a few of his humanist appeals, which all seemed very on the nose (Come back to Us!). Tom Newman was forced to carpet the whole damn movie and it wasn’t the bright idea.

 

Still, a good B.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed. The writing is definitely on the banal side but I actually appreciate the starkness of those vignettes. The film seemed to survey the war experience as a whole over the character itself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, KK said:

I agree that it wasn't as ambitious in its scope as his earlier films, but I found it to say beautiful things about faith, ego, surrender and speaks to Malick's belief in the inherent "goodness" of the human condition. One of my favourite films of the year.

Oh definitely. I enjoyed it very much. Malick on the big screen is a rarity, so I’m glad I didn’t wait until blu-ray. 
 

An amusing anecdote: While waiting for the film to start, an old couple were conversing with another old couple, and said that the movie is long and will probably leave halfway through. When questioned why you would only watch half a movie, they said that they could probably figure out the rest from the first hour.

 

Must have had no idea who Malick was!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Quintus said:

Me and the missus were planning to go and see 1917 this afternoon. That was until she brought up the website for our local Odeon - £15 each! Hahaha! THIRTY QUID for a couple to go and see a movie. Yeah right! 

Was that Odeon LUXE, by any chance? Telling you, mate, pay £17.99 a month for limitless and see everything as many times as you like.

 

Karol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
14 hours ago, Quintus said:

Me and the missus were planning to go and see 1917 this afternoon. That was until she brought up the website for our local Odeon - £15 each! Hahaha! THIRTY QUID for a couple to go and see a movie. Yeah right! 

 

And cinema chains wonder why they're struggling.

 

Netflix it is then!

 

Don't UK cinemas have a discount day during the week to drum up business?

 

Here in the U.S., many theater chains have a Tuesday discount where the tickets are $5-$8 all day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/19/2020 at 8:27 PM, crocodile said:

No, non-descript droning.

 

And, tell no one, but i even found the much-heralded Night Window sequence to be rather on the superficial side. The cue is great for a display of awe and wonder but i found it - in context of the movie at hand - a bit too polished and film-music like. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, Brundlefly said:

No, not great. The coming-of-age-part is very well done, but the satirical aspect is vacuous and embarrassing.


I respectfully disagree. I found it to be a absurd, though at times poignant satire. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Parasite

 

It's actually worth the hype and Oscar nominations. Boon Joon-ho keeps the movie on an even keel, keeping the plot unpredictable (but tangible) while expertly handling black comedy and suspense. The acting is excellent, especially Song Kang-ho, and the production specs are top-notch. I'm surprised Hong Kyung-pyo didn't get an Oscar nomination for Best Cinematography, because the camerawork is sublime.

 

It's definitely worth checking out in theaters. An original film that can't really be pegged into one genre.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
18 hours ago, Matt C said:

I'm surprised Hong Kyung-pyo didn't get an Oscar nomination for Best Cinematography, because the camerawork is sublime.

I'm not surprised. Movie award juries infamously haven't got a clue.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1917

 

One-shot (actually, two) gimmick is gimmick, who would’ve guessed...

 

It works in moments though: By far the best compositional choice of the whole of the piece happens early, when the two soldiers set off, and by far the most arresting shot is early in the night scene, where there’s what can only be described as a symphony of alternating light and shadows. A precious few moments of humanity work, too, but aren’t enough to fully elevate this beyond Oscar-munching.

 

Liked it.


***1/2 out of *****

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

bombshell-ld_d21_04710_r2_crop_rgb.jpg?w

 

Bombshell

 

It's no Big Short. A bit too stale and muted for that, but it has its moments, where you get a sense of the culture of defending creeps over at Fox at the time. Lithgow as a shouty Ailes nails it, and Theron disappears into Kelly, even if its a little too calculated in my opinion. But the whole thing is just kind of flat. The score had some interesting moments though.

 

Screen-Shot-2020-01-23-at-6-59-43-PM.png

 

Burning

 

A much subtler slice of auteurship than South Korea's more popular Parasite. Lee Chang-dong has a more dreamy language to his storytelling. This film is not interested in providing answers, but does ask for an attention to detail so that we probe deeper into its characters over the mystery it's built on. Beautifully shot, there is clearly a lot of great work happening in South Korean cinema.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Terminator Dark Fate

 

I don’t know what the fuss is about. I though it was a good movie.

 

I didn’t see any of the SJW-themes that reviewers have lamented drags the movie down, but found it to be an entertaining action movie.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Little Women (2019)

 

What a wonderful movie.  The story is told with confidence, charm, and skill.  I was under its spell from beginning to end.  It is immediately my favorite screen version of a story I have loved for more than 20 years. Saoirse is a goddess gifted to us from heaven.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


×
×
  • Create New...