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JoeinAR

What interests you in theatrical films today?

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What are you interested to see in theatrical films theses days?

Is it the fantastic? Horror? Comedy Everyday life, which may vary dramatically between our different lifestyles. Do you like small intimate films, quirky Coen-esc, or big budget blockbusters style films? 

 

There has probably never been such a variety of films as there are today all asking for your viewership. The competition is vast so what is it. I didn't want to do a poll, this is strictly essay material.

 

Me first. I do like the movie of the week, the big loud and brash. I go to the movies on average about 60 times a year. I love a double feature with my husband and yes we pay for 4 tickets since its assigned seating. He tolerates my horror films, and I tolerate a Mr. Rodgers documentary. But in general I dislike quirky films, the wes anderson films, and Coen films give me no joy, I appreciate them for their craft but they are for others. Movies about real life bore me because real life is what we all do. If modern film doesn't work for me i always have my films from the 30's 40's and 50's. 

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I don't watch too many films, nor too often: I think that constantly rushing to the cinema in the name of one's cinephillia is the surest way to make the filmgoing experience feel like a chore or a routine. Rather, I choose to savour the exeprience.

 

The films I do see are mostly tentpole blockbusters: I enjoy the spectacle and action like any other guy. But I do want explorations of humanity in my blockbusters. I think its all too easy to explore human themes in a traditional drama - the real trick is to do that in a blockbuster, without letting it be lost amidst the genre elements or the scale of the picture. Its not just a balancing act, either: I find that the best blockbusters are ones that use those narrative elements to prop the drama higher and higher.

 

Ideally, a film would either make me laugh (if its a comedy) or cry, or both.

 

I also have a fascination with serialized cinema. Crafting the story for a film is one thing, crafting a story told over multiple entries - now that's the real deal. By this I don't refer to series that rely on a shared setting, recurring characters or iconography - but of a unified story that's simply too big to be told within the confines of one film.

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6 minutes ago, mstrox said:

I only go to the big blockbusters with explosions.  Everything else I watch on a streaming service or rent for $0.30 on Redbox.

 

This, more or less.

 

Except I see anything Spielberg directs and/or Williams scores in theaters, regardless of genre

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1 hour ago, JoeinAR said:

Do you like small intimate films, quirky Coen-esc, or big budget blockbusters style films? 

 

Mostly the latter for me, though I'm also a fan of historical dramas, Wes Anderson-y films and the like.

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Movie magic still exists for me. Example a very derisive film, Jackson's 2005 King Kong, the central park scene...Kong on ice a few seconds of movie magic. For just a bit I was taken away.

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In principle, I'd prefer to see every film (that I choose to watch) on a huge screen with loud sound and that all-enveloping feeling. That I don't is down to a combination of laziness and failure to keep myself adequately apprised of new releases.

 

I'll definitely see any new Paul Thomas Anderson film in the cinema. Some other directors whose work I'd have a similar incentive to see are Nuri Bilge Ceylan, Michael Haneke and Kelly Reichardt, but their films aren't likely to be shown in the big cinemas.

 

I find that I haven't had any interest in the majority of the big blockbustery films, especially over the last decade or so. I think that I've yet to see a single Marvel film (at the cinema or anywhere else). Maybe I'm missing out, but the publicity around them leaves me cold.

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Generally I must be convinced that the movie is good from trailers/samples already; I experiment neither with my time nor money with modern artists/corporations.

Another problem is that modern ratings cannot be trusted. An old film with 7.9 on imdb is probably good. A modern one with 7.9 on imdb and even 80+ on metacritic can just suck.

And yet another one is that new movies have to compete with an unending list of good movies from 4 generations of filmmakers. I watch on average 120 unique movies per year at home, so I am not really hungry.

If old epics or generally good old films that I did not yet see were available on a silver screen, I would go sometimes. If I heard good music in trailers, I would also go, no matter the topic (the last time it happened was La La Land)

 

With that being said, over the last two years I saw 5 films in theaters: on my own Eisenstein's October from 1928 (not feasible to watch at home), Rogue One and Avengers: Infinity War (both picked from amongst other blockbusters as more serious and of higher quality). If that Nutcracker film, The Meg (brilliant trailer and posters!) or the newest Harry Potter were any good, I would go watch them too. I missed Overlord (which I wanted to see after a very positive recommendation from Red Letter Media) because it was pulled from German cinemas after 2 weeks. I also saw La La Land, but that is because I wanted to show my visiting mother the coolest cinema in my city and she chose that. Likewise I went last year with my entire Christmas family gathering to see a pleasant small-budget Christmas comedy Letters to Santa 3.

 

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I think the writing is mostly terrible for cinema today.

 

Cinema today is essentially glorified TV. It is in essence indistinct from TV in many cases as I could easily imagine watching something on Netlfix. 

 

I am looking for true cinema - something that is distinct for TV. I am looking for tightness in script and focus. And looking for a less diffuse experience. I am looking for a complete experience no cliff-hangers. And above all I am looking for formal aesthetic direction that sets it apart from TV.

 

Basically I want to go the cinema to watch cinema, not television in public.

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23 minutes ago, JoeinAR said:

Movie magic still exists for me. Example a very derisive film, Jackson's 2005 King Kong, the central park scene...Kong on ice a few seconds of movie magic. For just a bit I was taken away.

 

A very good example of what I look for in a movie.

 

It was a big blockbuster, with fantastical elements, and one of a particularly large scale, but at its heart it was first and foremost a drama. Or, more specifically, a tragedy.

 

As overly-long and at-times cluttered as the journey to the film's climax was, the fact that I was sobbing at the end of it (and still am, upon revisiting it) meant that it did work.

 

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Usually go by directors or whatever has buzzy WOM. Anything fantastical or musical is usually what I end up enjoying most.

 

I've seen fifteen 2018 releases so far in theaters and will probably only make it out to a couple more. Pretty low for me, but I've been watching less movies in general. Annihilation, Isle of Dogs, and Sorry to Bother You have been my favorites.

 

28 minutes ago, JoeinAR said:

Movie magic still exists for me. Example a very derisive film, Jackson's 2005 King Kong, the central park scene...Kong on ice a few seconds of movie magic. For just a bit I was taken away.

 

Yeah, even little moments like this are worth it for me. There are always a handful of really good scenes every year even if I don't find a new favorite movie.

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28 minutes ago, TheUlyssesian said:

I think the writing is mostly terrible for cinema today.

Cinema today is essentially glorified TV. It is in essence indistinct from TV in many cases as I could easily imagine watching something on Netlfix. 

I am looking for true cinema - something that is distinct for TV. I am looking for tightness in script and focus. And looking for a less diffuse experience. I am looking for a complete experience no cliff-hangers. And above all I am looking for formal aesthetic direction that sets it apart from TV.

Basically I want to go the cinema to watch cinema, not television in public.

Modern movies are created by apes and for apes. Ape shall not kill ape—but might disenchant all others!

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Regretfully my movie going interest has sort of fallen of a cliff and I'm almost entirely streaming TV focused these days. It's not that I have given up on film or think it isn't any good anymore (I'm not one of those jaded dinosaur assholes or anything like that), but rather that I just find TV runtime formats to be a far better fit for my lifestyle as I find it into my forties. 30 mins to 1hr in the evenings just suits my preferences better than having to devote practically a whole free evening to sitting through increasingly long modern movies. As for making the effort to go to the cinema, there's nothing worse than going to see a movie and then coming out of it to find the evening is essentially over and its almost time for bed. It's an even bigger waste to me when the movie was meh, as is a likely outcome.

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I do everything, as you can see from my 2018 list: https://mubi.com/lists/2018-films-ranked

 

Big blockbuster things from Hollywood, or weird arthouse movies from countries you didn't even know exist. But I realize it's easier, financially, for me since I do it for a living and get to see most films in festivals or press screenings. I could never afford to see so many films in the theatre otherwise. Of course, there is also a good deal of BD/DVD/Streaming films on there as well.

 

In general, I tend to veer towards films that are more visually oriented; or that somehow use visuals to mirror the story or theme rather than just being a backdrop. Less interested in dialogue-heavy movies or complex plotlines. The complexity has to come from within, not without. Which -- on the surface -- makes is surprising that THE POST is still in the lead, but it's less about the verbal information and more about the visual and aural energy that Spielberg inject into the "dry" proceedings.

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44 minutes ago, Quintus said:

 30 mins to 1hr in the evenings just suits my preferences better than having to devote practically a whole free evening to sitting through increasingly long modern movies. As for making the effort to go to the cinema, there's nothing worse than going to see a movie and then coming out of it to find the evening is essentially over and its almost time for bed. It's an even bigger waste to me when the movie was meh, as is a likely outcome.

 

This. And also i just don't get the bang for my buck with ticket prices starting at 8€ up to 12€. I enjoyed Mad Max and a few documentaries and that's it. The rest is/was intellectually vapid kiddie stuff (blockbusters) or random chances against the odds. I will watch stuff like 'Loving Vincent' or 'Roma' or a new Audiard, but these come by very seldom. Even Del Toro's new 'masterpiece' was rather meh. 

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Genre is as important as a pile of shit.

 

There are good movies and bad movies. Movies need to be good, that's all. There are just two categories of movies.

 

Fantastic Four, Green Lantern, A Wrinkle in Time

<<<>>>

The Mission, The Last Emperor, The Constant Gardener

 

Just examples, but you know what the idea is.

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4 hours ago, Horner's Dynamic Range said:

I couldn't make it through that version. I like the one with Jessica Lange.

Its not very good, it has one redeeming value, its score. Its so damn bloody and brutal.

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Nothing.

 

Peak cinema, which encompassed my growing up phase, started with Fellowship of the Ring, and ended with The Battle Of Five Armies.

It won't get any better in my lifetime, so I look for nothing, certainly not the embarassing tries to milk millennials' childhoods through the Disney Wars movies, and the Marvel movie clones.

 

Ah, I do want to watch the new Godzilla though very much.

 

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13 hours ago, TheUlyssesian said:

I think the writing is mostly terrible for cinema today. Cinema today is essentially glorified TV.

 

If by that you mean glorified MacGyver or The A-Team, then yes, absolutely. However, in the last 15 years, TV moved on from that and has become a sanctuary for writers and actors. 

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19 minutes ago, gkgyver said:

the Marvel movie clones.

 

I enjoy certain Marvel films very much (mostly as comedies), but in some ways the MCU is kind of the death of cinema.

 

I'm all for serialized cinema, but in a classic, focused "prequels and sequels" way - and only to a point, too. The multi-pronged, excruciatingly long-winded anthology route taken by Marvel and its copycats (Star Wars spinoffs, DCEU, etcetra) is just overkill.

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I don't really mind what it is, as long as it lifts me, emotionally.

I will not watch any more downbeat dramas, about growing up gay in a small town, or growing up gay and black in a small town, or being beaten up at school for being gay and/or black, in a small town, or growing up without a father who left the family home because he discovered that his son/daughter was gay and/or black, in a small town, or growing up with an alcoholic drug-addled mother, in a small town, or trying to relate to my family member/friend/work colleague who may or may not be gay and/or black, in a small bloody town! If I want small town drama, all I need to do is to look out the fucking window! If I want to see a film about alcohol consumption, I'll watch WHISKY GALORE, thank you very much.

There's no cinema, where I live, so I'm saving my pennies for a trip to Glasgow (nearest large town), to watch Ep. IX.

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6 hours ago, Alexcremers said:

 

If by that you mean glorified MacGyver or The A-Team, then yes, absolutely. However, in the last 15 years, TV moved on from that and has become a sanctuary for writers and actors. 

Tv is overrated. Tv movies are generally junk and the tv shows glorify  bad behavior. There are two types of tv watchers those that think Bryan Cranston can do no wrong and those of us who know who know he's a shitty actor. Oops he just got another emmy for mentioning his name.

But this thread is about theatrical films not tv and most certainly not Netflix or Amazon prime "film".

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19 minutes ago, JoeinAR said:

Tv is overrated.

 

Only to those who still find what they need in theaters. 

 

19 minutes ago, JoeinAR said:

 tv shows glorify  bad behavior.

 

Humanizing criminals is something you find in the theater and on TV. 

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On 11/27/2018 at 12:46 AM, Alexcremers said:

 

I wholeheartedly agree. (Y)

But you do still turn your nose to genre films admit it. 

 

I will always maintain certain genre films (horrorl cannot always be judge the same.

Alex is so afraid of Audiences these days.

 

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I don't often bother with anything besides the film festival these days.  There's just not much that's interested me lately.  I haven't seen a "blockbuster" since Jumanji (which, honestly, I found really fun).  There aren't a whole lot of films which really demand a "cinema experience" (Loving Vincent comes to mind).  That said, I'm probably going to see Green Book tomorrow.

 

On 11/26/2018 at 7:03 PM, Brundlefly said:

A Wrinkle in Time

<<<>>>

The Mission, The Last Emperor, The Constant Gardener

 

Just examples, but you know what the idea is.

Oh what should have been.

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