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What Is The Last Score You Listened To? (older scores)


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The Adventures of Tintin and War Horse. 2011 was an excellent year for John Williams fans. Both albums are hugely enjoyable.   Karol

LOTR: The Fellowship of the Ring (CR) by Howard Shore   Damn, is this shit good. I've waxed enough poetic about these scores, but this time, I'm especially struck by how FOTR works as a mood

Elmer Bernstein - The Unused Scores   This set spans three Bernstein rejections, starting in 1985 - probably his first - to 1995, when he already became notorious for being thrown off as muc

3 hours ago, Jurassic Shark said:

Is it that bad? ;)

 

No, don't even joke about it. It has some of the most beautiful themes I've heard in about a week.

 

But seriously now, it was really beautiful, both film and score. I love art which contains a sense of nostalgia.

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7 minutes ago, Loert said:

No, don't even joke about it. It has some of the most beautiful themes I've heard in about a week.

 

I agree that the themes and their original arrangements/performances are beautiful. However, I find much of the soundtrack a frustrating listening experience away from the film.

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Onward :music:

The majority of it is made up of terrible 20-second parody stingers but there's one really good theme that plays in the emotional scenes.  The music is forced to play an active role in punctuating jokes, which makes it neither musically satisfying nor funny.

 

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Been a few in past week or so

 

Goldsmith- Planet of the Apes (fantastic main theme and The Hunt is exceptional), Capricorn One, Islands in the Stream, Night Crossing, Players

 

Williams- Close Encounters, Jaws, Revenge of the Sith (still have my gold sleeved CD it seems), ET and Lincoln

 

Barry- Swept from the Sea, The Tamarind Seed, Petulia, Somewhere in Time, Body Heat and Dances With Wolves

 

been going to my Ben-Hur 2CD a few times lately and drawn to the music for the galley scenes. Particularly "The Galley (Rowing of the Slaves)". Relentless and increasingly so to the climax. Perfect for the film, Ben-Hur is the kind of film that screams EPIC.

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A couple of John scores I am not familiar enough with as I should be

 

Kingdom Of The Crystal Skull

Not a bad score by any means.  Some killer moments here, some which reflect Williams's 2000s complex writing and others which anticipate the sparseness of TFA.

 

Jaws 2

Quite good actually, don't know why I never bothered to give this one a spin.  To its credit, it does not rely too much on the original's material.  It's not as high brow, if that makes sense, less of a classical study on the mindless forces of the world and more an out and out disaster score with some very engaging writing.     

 

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U. S. Marshals

 

Got my Varése shipment. As expected, the new material doesn't fundamentally change one's perception of this solid, blunt action score from the maestro's late phase. Goldsmith's cold, driving concept works perfectly both as a mirror of Gerard's personality and an almost dystopian world with no warmth and few hugs. The (in)famous 6-note angular core motif is as cold and distant as is TL Jones' portrait of this movie's 'hero', and a battery of driving motifs surrounding it clues you in on the movie's goal-oriented agenda.

 

True, Stuart Baird's movie is a true potboiler (tell the story!) and Goldsmith's knack for getting inside a movie inevitably makes him follow suit. But for what it is, it's a perfectly measured work. Even the synth work is more engaging than overbearing (no more drum machines), and we may excuse the bluntness of the writing, for the percussion section in particular, as Goldsmith himself noted/excused that at this point (1998) these were the only tools that allowed you to compete against an elaborate sound mix where subtleties just wouldn't cut it.

 

A Rambo-ish side motif for Wesley Snipes (derived from the Gerard material somewhat, it's not that essential due to its mostly only second-long interpolation) and a cool, swaying brass motif utilized for two fights with Bob Downey Jr. round the presentation (all included above), so you can add 20 minutes to Varése's initial presentation. If you're only mildly interested in Goldsmith's action scores, the cues Sinking Plane, Following Chen, The Front Gate and the jazzy/heroic finale feature all the important building blocks.

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Batman Begins

BB introduced new ways to imagine and produce blockbuster scores to the audience. It deals with the kind of personal trauma that very often defines people's lives. I needed a break from Williams' philosophy of film scoring and I'm rewarded with a maturing experience. 

 

Munich

Some people say it's imitative but I disagree. It's still Williams. 

 

(Y)

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4 hours ago, A Ghost From Highwood said:

Batman Begins

BB introduced new ways to imagine and produce blockbuster scores to the audience. It deals with the kind of personal trauma that very often defines people's lives. I needed a break from Williams' philosophy of film scoring and I'm rewarded with a maturing experience. 

 

Munich

Some people say it's imitative but I disagree. It's still Williams. 

 

(Y)

Munich is a top 15 Williams score

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5 hours ago, A Ghost From Highwood said:

Batman Begins

BB introduced new ways to imagine and produce blockbuster scores to the audience. It deals with the kind of personal trauma that very often defines people's lives. I needed a break from Williams' philosophy of film scoring and I'm rewarded with a maturing experience. 

 

 

I'm not exactly a fan of this score. There's one or two moments that I like, but other than that, the other Zimmer Bat-scores were much more efficient. I guess it would've been a better score if it was a solo effort by either Zimmer or JNH. Still, it's been years since I've heard it, may need to re-visit it again.

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51 minutes ago, Edmilson said:

 

I'm not exactly a fan of this score. There's one or two moments that I like, but other than that, the other Zimmer Bat-scores were much more efficient. I guess it would've been a better score if it was a solo effort by either Zimmer or JNH. Still, it's been years since I've heard it, may need to re-visit it again.

solo effort by JNH, that's what everyone should've gotten!!!!:)

2 hours ago, Not Mr. Big said:

top 15

Top 10 ;) A continuation of the more brutal aspects of Schindler's List. 

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I've never really dug into Goldsmith's repertoire as much as I would've liked to. I'm only familiar with a small selection of his more popular scores and have never delved any deeper, much to my shame. Isolation has offered ample time to expand my tastes in this regard, and I'm quite pleased to say that I've thoroughly enjoyed a few random picks from Jerry's filmography over the past few days.

 

The Ballad of Cable Hogue by Jerry Goldsmith

Satisfactory Western twang punctuated by a couple Richard Gillis songs. Much enjoyed.

 

Logan's Run by Jerry Goldsmith

Runs a line right between the whimsically futuristic and sweeping romance. 

 

Rio Conchos by Jerry Goldsmith

Bandits Ho! is my keeper cue from this. Great percussion and lots of pep. Certainly feels like a Western score.

 

The Boys From Brazil by Jerry Goldsmith

 

as well as...

 

The Passion of the Christ by John Debney

Picked it up in rather good condition but second-hand about a year ago and had never listened to it. Kind of a cliché, but Easter weekend is as good a time as any I suppose. Intriguing ethnic qualities and rousing choir. May revisit next year. 

 

Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire by Patrick Doyle

Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets by John Williams

Harry Potter and the Philosopher's Stone by John Williams

I'm trying to finally work through the books with my extra time now, and Williams and co. underscore my quiet afternoons reading with my cat to perfection. Also a good opportunity to familiarize myself with Doyle, Hooper and Desplat's contributions, which I've never heard outside the films.

 

J'Accuse by Alexandre Desplat 

Adults in the Room by Alexandre Desplat

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The Swarm - Jerry Goldsmith

 

Goldsmith's action material here is wonderful, isn't it? A great score that I'll be returning more frequently.

 

Pearl Harbor (recording sessions) - Hans Zimmer

 

It's good to see Zimmer tackling an action movie that is also a romantic tragedy, which made him write a more softer material. It's a little repetitive, specially on its complete form, but it has its moments of Zimmer going full Horner or Barry. That said, I shouldn't watched the movie, because when listening to this I am reminded of that laughable, pathetic movie and then I can't take Zimmer's melodramatic patriotism serious anymore :( .

 

The bootleg includes the action music from when Affleck and the guy from Penny Dreadful go flying their planes and shooting enemies during the attack on Pearl Harbor. It's pretty good music, more in line with Gladiator, Pirates of the Caribbean and Captain America: Civil War - basically, RCP's MO when they want to go swashbuckling and orchestral. I wonder why Zimmer didn't put it on the official OST, maybe it wasn't him who wrote it? Perhaps it was Jablonsky or Badelt?

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Black Sunday

 

As already stated, one random listen was all it took to get me to buy it. Low, rythmic, moody, catchy, driven, ramps up by the end, sound quality's fantastic by the era's standards. Wow.

Those source cues after the score are such an amusing relief from the oppressive mood!

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:music: The Tone Poems of Kevin Kaska. My CD arrived earlier today and now going through it. It might not be the most original music ever but the 65-minute album sure should appeal to people who like Kaska's contributions to Lair video game scores. He also seems to be haunted by Williams' prequel score which you can hear in this piece:

 

 

The quieter parts are probably even better.

 

 

Karol

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My listens during the last week or so:

 

Apollo 13 by James Horner

 

The Legends of the Fall by James Horner

 

Far and Away by John Williams

 

Hellboy by Marco Beltrami

 

Conan the Barbarian by Basil Poledouris

 

Troy by Gabriel Yared


Warhorse by John Williams

 

Star Wars The Rise of Skywalker by John Williams

 

Robin Hood the Prince of Thieves by Michael Kamen

 

Air Force One by Jerry Goldsmith

 

Glory by James Horner

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34 minutes ago, Jay said:

Yup @Jay I did see the news but I am on the fence whether I should buy it or not. I feel that the OST is certainly long enough and it is a great score but I don't know the score in the film so intimately as to recall is there anything major missing from it.

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4 minutes ago, Incanus said:

Yup I did see the news but I am on the fence whether I should buy it or not. I feel that the OST is certainly long enough and I don't know the score in the film so intimately as to recall is there anything major missing from it.

I listened to the OST for the first time in ages not long ago and, to my amazement, I actually really liked it. It was the album I avoided for years. Yes, it sounds like Horner is doing a bit of Barry and the schmaltz sometimes verges on parody...but it's so well crafted that I just couldn't resist. That, plus Mike Matessino/Neil S. Bulk tackling this project. Yeah, why the hell not! Horner melodrama at its most melodramatic.

 

Karol

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4 minutes ago, crocodile said:

I listened to the OST for the first time in ages not long ago and, to my amazement, I actually really liked it. It was the album I avoided for years. Yes, it sounds like Horner is doing a bit of Barry and the schmaltz sometimes verges on parody...but it's so well crafted that I just couldn't resist. That, plus Mike Matessino/Neil S. Bulk tackling this project. Yeah, why the hell not! Horner melodrama at its most melodramatic.

 

Karol

Well separated from the film the score makes a fine album of glorious Horner melodrama which stands very well on its own as a musical narrative. Might purchase the Intrada release at some point if I am feeling completist enough. :) 

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Recently went through the Ice Age scores at the urging of a friend, so here's quick thoughts on them:

#1 - A very endearing journey that manages to captivate in spite of not being the most memorable thing. I've given it 3 listens and at no point has it worn down on me or left me bored. I'll admit that not everything sticks with me, but it hits every beat it aims.

#2 - A bombastic outing that manages to be stronger thematically, but loses a bit of oomph in the middle. Powell is certainly building on his signature style, seeing as there's quite a few trademarks that define his work that are present here. While it did start off strong, it did trail off after a bit. Still would be glad to revisit it.

#3 - Not much needs to be said, other than it seriously kicks ass. Very little to complain about, other than I definitely need to give it another go soon.

#4 - Another fun entry in the Powell canon, even if I'm starting to hear his patience wear a bit thin with what he had to work with. Might be on par with 2, though this likely left slightly less of an impression (outside of the blatantly odd moments).

#5 - The literal definition of orchestral noise and/or generic children scores. There was a lot of potential here that simply wasn't capitalized on, likely thanks to how godawful the film is. It offers practically no real thematic material, and basically is only concerned with hitting the correct on screen beats. Very little stuck with me outside of moments where I was reminded of better music (whether it's the previous scores or Raimi Spidey). I wouldn't oppose giving it another go, whether through the OST again or the eventual leak. But it's definitely among weakest stuff I've heard thus far, and I certainly feel sorry for Debney. Christian Clemmensen can go fuck himself.

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1917, Thomas Newman.

 

Saw the movie for the first time yesterday... Wow.
Mendes, Deakins and Newman at the top of their game.
I already gave the score a listen before, but it didn't stick with me: after watching the movie I fell in love with it.

I rearranged all the Spotify tracks in chronological order, obviously.

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