Jump to content

The most orchestrally complex tracks that Williams has ever written?


Recommended Posts

For his film-music and not concert. While watching a film, you aren't really just listening to music so for Williams to still go ahead and attempt extremely complicated music is remarkable.

 

List individual tracks.

 

The Pursuit of the Falcon - Tintin (very vast tempo and various virtuoso figurines flowing up and down the track and complex interplay of melodies. And movie-wise, every minute occurrence on the screen is reflected in Williams music.)

Hedwig's Theme - Harry Potter 1 (a simple enough melody enlivened by the orchestra going into a maelstrom of activity around it)

Harry Wondrous's World (an elaborately orchestrated and busy suite with multiple lines of melodies going on many times and many orchestra accents adorning it)

 

But that's just what it sounds to me ear. People with more musical knowledge would know more.

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • Replies 46
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Popular Posts

Jaws.  He could have gone with just one note, but he went the extra mile with two. 

If I had to pick one piece, it would probably be the original version of the Close Encounters suite.    It covers so much musical territory so perfectly. I vividly remember as a yo

Also, this is insanely complex with regards to harmony, orchestration, rhythm, meter and dynamics:    

The Quidditch Match

8 minutes of pure orchestral hyperactivity. Probably my favourite ever JW action cue.

 

The Whomping Willow and the Snowball Fight

The first 15 seconds is some of the most precise music JW has ever written (in my opinion)

 

To the Plaza Presto

So much going on in this cue, similar to The Pursuit of the Falcon.

 

The Ultimate War

Another action cue. All the themes from Hook pop up somewhere.

Link to post
Share on other sites
11 minutes ago, Alex said:

The Quidditch Match

8 minutes of pure orchestral hyperactivity. Probably my favourite ever JW action cue.

 

The Whomping Willow and the Snowball Fight

The first 15 seconds is some of the most precise music JW has ever written (in my opinion)

 

To the Plaza Presto

So much going on in this cue, similar to The Pursuit of the Falcon.

 

The Ultimate War

Another action cue. All the themes from Hook pop up somewhere.

 

I almost mentioned Whomping Willow and the Snowball Fight too but for the second part - the Snowball Fight which on the surface is this charming underscore but is actually a really fast tempo display with the orchestra pulling many hijinks going from section to section. Only Williams could score something so minor with something so complex.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Depends what you mean with 'complex'. Are you talking the densest amount of notes or 'stuff' happening at once (sorry for my amateur musical lingo), or complex as in dissonant/atonal/less accesible?

Link to post
Share on other sites
19 hours ago, filmmusic said:

Hook- The Arrival of Tink and the Flight to Neverland

 

Yes excellent. Imo this one can certainly be considered one of the most complex in terms of orchestration.

 

23 hours ago, Thor said:

Depends what you mean with 'complex'. Are you talking the densest amount of notes or 'stuff' happening at once (sorry for my amateur musical lingo), or complex as in dissonant/atonal/less accesible?

 

Considering the title, I think the OP asks about the complexity of the orchestration. To me that seems to be about which instrument plays what and when, and how many instruments play at the same time etc, the colouring of the music.

 

We can add this as well: Mine cart chase from ToD. 

 

 

Link to post
Share on other sites
  • 4 months later...
  • 10 months later...

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines.