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Showing content with the highest reputation on 21/10/21 in all areas

  1. "Hey John, there are a bunch of snobbish critics who hate your music and think that you should not be allowed to perform in Europe." "I know, but they are all dead."'
    3 points
  2. It's not just 70-year-olds who cough and make noise during concerts. In that regard, the FFP2 mask rule actually helps. Sure, it would be more comfortable without them, but aside from the obvious fact that they make these concerts possible without killing people, they also make the audience very reluctant to cough during the concert. A week before Berlin I attended a chamber concert at the Musikverein and heard one cough throughout the entire programme. I wish people will still remember how to do that when we can finally leave the masks off.
    3 points
  3. Never mind music critics, they are about as relevant as film music fans (and an even smaller group). The real situation is a Catch 22: the film music programs that fill the venues are strictly Pops material, and composers have always been reluctant to re-work their film music into something more substantial (and probably for good reason). On the other hand, concertos like JNH, Elfman or Horner did (and JW, of course) would be suitable but the audiences would stay away in droves. So even if i agree that film music is the popular concert music of today (up to a point), i wish there was more of an effort to deepen the scores presented beyond end credits reworkings. Case in point: Desplat's 10-minute Ghost Writer arrangement, which took me by surprise.
    2 points
  4. It's funny that this thread was recently revived, because I just revisited this score again today. Not that there is ever much time that passes between listens, because this is definitely one of my favorite Horner scores (echoing Jay). While it doesn't have the dramatic flair of his film scores, I think it is the lack of drama that makes it so nice to listen to. The mood and tone of this score clicked with me instantly, which is such a rare thing for a score to do to me anymore. I actually didn't even see the film until a few days ago, and while it was a good IMAX film (it is a shame I missed it during its run, because the experience would have been amazing with the music score blaring), the music truly lives on its own. I play it while driving quite frequently, which it is perfect for. But it also suits well just trying to absorb a thoughtful and engaging mood, which is very hard to accomplish with current events these days... but this score somehow brings me right back to what it sets out to make me feel. Moving, flowing, exhilarating at times... and even a sense of thoughtful, emotional, nostalgia. A sort of emotional time travel of one's life. By far my favorite moment of listening to this score, which will be obvious, is when I listened to it more than once on a flight from California to Florida in March of 2019. To say it works impressively in that circumstance is a understatement. Some aspects of the score are cheesy in that Titanic/Avatar Horner pop kind of way, but somehow it REALLY works in this score. I don't mind it at all. The one track that I actually omit from my playlist of this score is, unsurprisingly, the big band "Flowers" track. On its own it is actually a really fun track, and now having seen the film it really worked great in its sequence. But it sort of destroys the mood of the rest of the album; so I only play it on rare occasions. At first I thought, "oh I only like this score so much because it is one of his last ones ever released"... but when it still gets played years later, usually in (99%) full sequence, it is definitely one of my favorite Horner scores. For me it sits right next my other favorites of his like Land Before Time, Rocketeer, Aliens, Titanic, and Krull. But it honestly gets more rotation than any of those. Also, Jay, I am glad you mentioned the CDs on Amazon for such a good price, considering it is sold out on Intrada and goes for like $40 at least on eBay now. I finally snagged a copy just a couple days ago (after having a digital version all this time)! Seriously, more people need to hear this score if they haven't already. I feel like it could be easily missed. NOTE: Now that I have seen the film, I think there are actually maybe one or two pieces of music missing. I honestly forget where at in the film now, but they were super brief and nothing that felt needed, thank goodness. This is one of those cases where I am 99% happy with the album ("Flowers" should have been a bonus track at the end, LOL).
    2 points
  5. Tallguy

    Villeneuve's DUNE

    Nothing at home beats going to the cinema. Even these days. (I don't generally go to theaters with crappy sound and picture.) Someone pointed out on a podcast that there are certain stars that you just don't "get" why they are stars on a TV. But when they're 50 feet tall? Magic. I used to divide my movies into "Gotta see that on the big screen" (your Jurassic Parks, your Top Guns, your Star War) and I can see that at home (your rom coms, your two or three character dramas). But getting to see Anthony Hopkins act at 50 feet tall is pretty amazing. I enjoy watching movies at home, sure. But movies are a community experience. One of my most treasured experiences was seeing The Sixth Sense. When she drops the ring. Different people "got it" at different moments and you heard the oohs and ahhs and gasps ripple through the audience. Another was seeing Return of the Jedi on opening day. The 20th Century Fox logos came up and the crowd went nuts. Then "A long time ago" came up and everyone went totally still. Then it said Star Wars and everyone went crazy again. Seeing Endgame with an eager crowd all enjoying the heck out of it together. "On your left!" There's a reason that when they advertised Black Widow they showed clips of people seeing that scene all together. I'll be as misanthropic as anyone, but other people are good to see movies with. (Except the ones who talk. Screw those people.) And finally. When I see a movie at the cinema I'm going to SEE the whole movie from start to finish. During the pandemic (and since having kids) there are too many movies that I've see 30 minutes at a time. (Justice League is certainly a special case.) THREE MORE DAYS!
    2 points
  6. So finally we can start our collection of Berlin flubs!
    1 point
  7. AC1

    Villeneuve's DUNE

    Traditional IMAX 70mm film, yes. But these days it's usually 4K digital projection. Though I admit I haven't seen it yet.
    1 point
  8. Aw man. I've rewatched the Friday video several times and figured out what happened. Since there's a big slow-down in the bar before the credits, Williams subdivides the last beat of the measure (beat 4) as two eighth-notes. For reference, a normal conducting pattern in a 4-beat measure is down (1), in (2), out (3), up (4). However, since Williams wants to split beat 4 into two eighth notes, he actually beats beat 4 down (and kind of low), and then for the upbeat of beat 4 (so, the eighth-note before the credits, aka the second half of beat 4), he beats up. Everyone else seems to catch what Williams is doing. But if the trumpet player for some reason isn't able to see Williams kind of gently beating beat 4 down low, then when he sees Williams beat upwards he thinks "Oh, that's beat 4" and plays his pickup note after that. ...When actually, Williams' upstroke is the "and" of beat 4, the second half of the beat. That's why the trumpet player's note is so short; he thinks Williams' upstroke is the entire beat 4 (rather than the latter half of beat 4 which it actually is), so he plays his eighth-note pickup to the credits twice as short as it should be. He can plainly tell where Williams is about to put his downbeat for the start of the credits, but since he mistakenly thinks beat 4 is so short (when actually, it's so long that Williams subdivides it!), he plays his pickup note short. Since he doesn't notice Williams' downward beat 4, he probably thinks beat 3 is actually the one being super-stretched (almost like a mini fermata). It's just a fundamental misunderstanding. In other words, the guy doesn't seem to be catching Williams' actual beat 4. And since beat 4 is usually conducted as an upstroke - not down - the trumpet player thinks he's seeing beat 4 being conducted, when actually he's seeing the second half of beat 4 being conducted. Sorry if this is confusing; I hope someone else on the forum who is musically-literate understands the point I'm trying to make. Go see for yourself in the video; can anyone else confirm they're seeing what I'm seeing? It's a bummer. The thing is, as a musician (and a brass player), I can see why the trumpet player would think the way he did. The issue could have been avoided if Williams conducted beat 4 as a partial upstroke (which would have made everyone plainly aware of where beat 4 was), and then re-beat up in the air to signal the second half of the beat. So basically, conduct beat 4 in the normal direction (upwards), but do two gestures upwards to subdivide the beat, so everybody knows what is what. TLDR: Normally beat 4 is conducted as an upstroke, but Williams conducted beat 4 as a downstroke so he could do the second half of beat 4 as an upstroke. The trumpet player mistakenly thought the upstroke Williams did for the second half of beat 4, was actually the beginning of beat 4. That's why the trumpet player's last note before the credits is so late and short. EDIT: Yep, he played it correctly on Thursday night; listen to how his note is longer and lines up with the rest of the orchestra. So, I'm 99% sure that's what happened. The other times, the guy got confused by what Williams was doing for beat 4 of that measure, and you can hear he sounds a little uncertain as to the placement of his note. Too bad; hopefully Thursday gets used for that spot in the commercial recording, but I won't hold my breath. @Sibelius6, thoughts?
    1 point
  9. I recorded the piece on Thursday, so you can compare.
    1 point
  10. Just saw a clip of the Freedom 7 launch from this series. Kamen was so good. You know how you listen to a track or a main title and you say "Wow, I wish this was like three times as long"? That scene is that wish come true.
    1 point
  11. I interpreted that as a deliberate creative decision, not a mistake. Loved the tension of holding that note before blasting into the main theme -- very musically satisfying to my ears!
    1 point
  12. You can PM me those
    1 point
  13. I think nudes and lewds are against the new rules, so I’ve been making slightly fewer posts of late.
    1 point
  14. That album would be number one with a Bullitt.
    1 point
  15. Dr. Know

    Goodbye, Mr Chips

    RIP Leslie Bricusse
    1 point
  16. Romão

    Villeneuve's DUNE

    Well, not to go off topic, but I will be watching this tomorrow in IMAX
    1 point
  17. 1 point
  18. I try to cancel it out by shaking my own head in synchronisation.
    1 point
  19. Para todo aquel que esté impaciente (como yo ), he diseñado esta funda por si queréis usarla. También tengo las pistas cortadas. Si alguien los quiere, pídamelos.
    1 point
  20. The attempt on Bespin's account has left him.....scarred..... and deformed
    1 point
  21. badbu

    Hans Zimmer's DUNE (2021)

    tomorrow: The Art and Soul of Dune!
    1 point
  22. They tried to purge me, unsuccessfully!
    1 point
  23. In Europe, these orchestras are state-financed and treated as a common good and long-serving custodians of cultural heritage. They are subsidised well-enough to attract top professionals, many of whom are doubly active as scholars and educators. The Vienna and Berlin philharmonics are flagships of their kind recognized not only in their specific countries, but in the whole of Europe, and even beyond. There are some amongst the public who care about preserving what is worthwhile in the surrounding culture, and since John Williams is to not so few of them the last titanic representative of pencil-and-paper era orchestral composers, there is obviously some commotion, beginning with civil discussions, to fix the aforementioned institutions so that they do not ignore such state of matters. Myself, I work for one of the world's most acclaimed classical music institutions (can't say more because of my contract), and I am a fan of countless recordings made by other great orchestras of Europe over the past century, so I do not feel like giving up on whether the orchestra I support with my work plays some of the best music composed in living memory in front of a jubilant public, or whether it behaves like a mixture of a dusty museum and a loony political rally. There is nothing more optimistic to me than a happy applause at the beginning of a piece of classical music. Such attitudes cumulated over the past two decades, including people voting with their wallets accordingly, until we have all been gifted Williams conducting two sets of extremely succesful "tribute" concerts at the litmus halls of European cultural conservatism. It's nice to see such a healthy and positive generational shift at play. La Scala under Williams and the Concertgebouw under Denève next!
    1 point
  24. I’m in the “not super excited for this” camp. Especially if that really is Gia’s new theme. THIS teaser on the other hand did a terrific job of taking my interest from 0 to 60 with the use of Elfman’s music 😊 Shame the Batman I want to see is stuffed into another movie. Do we know who’s scoring this?
    1 point
  25. For me it's mostly because it's both hard and takes a lot of time for me to write and get across what I want to say in English. Experiencing John Williams live in Berlin last week really made me wish I had put in more of an active effort to this community, because I want to share my joy with someone who understands. I've been 'lurking' here since 2004, though, and feel like I know many of the members - which actually makes me feel a bit creepy, because I doubt they'd remember anything about me. Even though I don't post much or often I check the site daily and read most of the topics, actually.
    1 point
  26. Do us all a favor and don't fill this thread up with these stale as fuck TLJ opinions. Can't speak for crumbs but I'd doubt he'd want his topic and hardwork sidetracked like this. Take it to that dumpster fire of a star wars thread.
    1 point
  27. The tempi were very good. It seems like someone told Johnny that in Vienna it was a bit too slow. Jurassic Park on friday was the fastest I've ever heard it perform.
    1 point
  28. While waiting for the official one...
    1 point
  29. This week I took the shrinkwrap off my physical copy I had picked up when Intrada released it on CD in 2018. When this album first hit streaming in 2016, I loved it instantly and listened to it frequently for a while. I hadn't actually heard it in quite a bit though, so listening to it again this week was great, like an old friend coming to visit. This might be one of my favorite Horner albums. It doesn't satisfy me in the same way my favorite Horner scores to narrative films do, but its one of those cases where each track is just so different and interesting and so good, it's like they all bring a smile to my face and makes the album engaging the entire time. This time I paid special attention to the "remix" tracks at the end and realized how different they are from their main program counterparts. They make the whole album even stronger by capping off with them instead of the first End Credits track. The Intrada booklet is only 1 triple-wide, no stapled interior pages, and features a nice note from the film's director about James and the score. Good stuff all around! I just went to Intrada's site to see they've marked it Sold Out: http://store.intrada.com/s.nl/it.A/id.11454/.f Yet, there are copies on Amazon US available for $10: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07BVVCFLT/
    1 point
  30. After the specialty labels stopped shipping to Aussieland he's been gradually losing it.
    1 point
  31. I guess you didn't read the "Berliner Zeitung " review...
    0 points
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