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Lewya

Here is what other composers are saying about Williams

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8 minutes ago, Steve McQueen said:

Am I wrong, or is he commending Williams for taking a diverse array of influences (Jazz, Stravinsky, Ravel, Massenett) into unique music that has broad public appeal?  

@Bespin? @Chewy?

 

Correct. Immediately before that, he also said something like "he opened to the wide public and audience the music of the 20th century", and that he (Desplat) finds it fantastic. A very nice comment. 

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14 hours ago, Score said:

 

Correct. Immediately before that, he also said something like "he opened to the wide public and audience the music of the 20th century", and that he (Desplat) finds it fantastic. A very nice comment. 

 

Yep. He also says that Williams managed to merge in his music various styles that you would not think about and that it made people listen to something they would not have listened otherwise.

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5 hours ago, SteveMc said:

A Scottish accent.  

Indeed. Charming Scottish brogue, the key to his success.

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3 minutes ago, crumbs said:

 

I'm sure Stepmom was a close 4th.

 

Follow by Rosewood! :lol:

 

11 hours ago, TheUlyssesian said:

Patrick Doyle asked to pick his top 3 scores ever: The Godfather, E.T. and Close Encounters.

 

I wonder when those scores will get proper rereleases.

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Just found this, some old comments on Williams by Nico Muhly:

 

"Movies with scores by John Williams are always satisfying; it’s always just interesting enough that you don’t want to kill yourself and always splashy enough that you feel like you are In the Movies. So, that’s fun. I think he’s the only person who can even come close to doing an okay job of ytt.]"

 

"I do like those John Williams scores because he knows his way around the orchestra, and he knows his way around character development through music."

 

I can't find the exact comment right now, but I also think he said something among the lines that the Star Wars scores work fine in the films, but on their own, he is not really eager to listen to them.

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4 minutes ago, Lewya said:

I think he’s the only person who can even come close to doing an okay job of ytt.

 

What's ytt?

 

4 minutes ago, Lewya said:

 

I can't find the comment, but I also think he said something among the lines that the Star Wars scores work fine in the films, but on their own, he is not really eager to listen to them.

 

I'm not eager to listen to Nico Muhly.

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I also found this about Andrew Norman and his connection to Williams - Star Wars in particular - perhaps the leading American composer of his generation.

 

LOS ANGELES — When Andrew Norman was growing up, “Star Wars” was the only film his family owned on video. “We watched it every weekend for, seriously, years on end,” he said in October, during a short hike up a steep hill near his home. Fascinated by John Williams’s classic score, Mr. Norman decided when he was young that he wanted to be a composer.

 

Little on the surface of “Split” resembles Mr. Williams’s scores, but Mr. Norman’s symphonic works are suffused with cinematic scope. “It’s all swirling around in my head,” Mr. Norman said of his childhood fascination with “Star Wars” and video games. “But I think it has more to do with storytelling, now, than the actual musical gestures.”

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2015/11/29/arts/music/andrew-norman-on-loving-star-wars-and-pushing-musical-boundaries.html

 

["Norman was born in Grand Rapids, Michigan, but grew up in Modesto, California. His father was an evangelical pastor; in childhood, Norman played keyboards in church bands. It was repeated viewings of Star Wars, with John Williams’s thrilling score, that first attracted him to the idea of composing. Lush neo-Romanticism infused much of his early work, which received performances at the Modesto Symphony. As his education proceeded, first at USC and then at the Yale School of Music, he underwent a crisis: His encounters with masterpieces of modernism caused him to reject what he had done up to that point and to doubt his forward path. In an interview with William Robin, for the New York Times, Norman recalled telling a professor: “I would rather quit composing, period, than be viewed as a neo-Romantic, or a reactionary, or a naïve composer.”
 
The problem is a common one among young composers: how to find a voice that absorbs contemporary currents while retaining the expressive urgency that drew you to composing in the first place. In a series of works in the first decade of the 21st century—the orchestral piece Sacred Geometry; Gran Turismo, for eight violins; and an extended trio titled A Companion Guide to Rome—Norman not only solved this problem but found a voice singularly his own. He is the rare living composer whom you can recognize from just a few bars of an unknown piece. At the heart of a typical Norman passage, you find straightforward harmonic or melodic materials. For example, the final movement of Play is based around a bright little squiggle in the key of A major. But such half-familiar fragments are thrown into a kaleidoscopic swirl, fragmenting and reconstituting themselves before one’s ears. An almost childlike simplicity is folded into musical processes of dizzying energy and complexity..."
 
 
22 minutes ago, Jurassic Shark said:

What's ytt?

Should be *it I think.

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What is John Williams saying about other composers?

 

What are composers saying about other John Williamses?

 

If Cinderella's shoe fit perfectly, why did it fall off?

 

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Michael Daugherty: "The wonderful music of John Williams is old school: you hear counterpoint, counter melodies, great orchestrations, changes of tempo and rubatos. I must say, I miss the old days of film music; the scores of Alfred Newman, Max Steiner and Bernard Herrmann for example. That way of composing virtuosic film music may come back someday, but at the moment we are in a very technologically driven world of film music, that, in my personal opinion, has inhibited the creative possibilities."

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On 3/13/2019 at 6:07 PM, Lewya said:

Michael Daugherty: "The wonderful music of John Williams is old school: you hear counterpoint, counter melodies, great orchestrations, changes of tempo and rubatos. I must say, I miss the old days of film music; the scores of Alfred Newman, Max Steiner and Bernard Herrmann for example. That way of composing virtuosic film music may come back someday, but at the moment we are in a very technologically driven world of film music, that, in my personal opinion, has inhibited the creative possibilities."

 

That's a beautiful quote. Where did you find it?

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