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Hans Zimmer and Harold Faltermeyer‘s TOP GUN: MAVERICK (2022)


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Hans Zimmer & Harold Faltermeyer to score ‘Top Gun: Maverick’.

 

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Tom Cruise revealed in a video message at this yesterday’s Hollywood in Vienna concert that Hans Zimmer will be scoring the upcoming action drama Top Gun: Maverick. Hans-Zimmer.com has confirmed that the composer will be collaborating with Harold Faltermeyer, who composed the music for Tony Scott’s 1986 original film. Cruise has previously mentioned that Faltermeyer’s music will be featured in the sequel. Top Gun: Maverick is directed by Joseph Kosinski (Oblivion, Tron Legacy) and stars Cruise, alongside Miles Teller, Val Kilmer, Jon Hamm, Ed Harris, Jennifer Connelly, Glen Powell, Lewis Pullman, Charles Parnell, Jay Ellis, Bashir Salahuddin, Danny Ramirez and Monica Barbaro. Peter Craig (The Town), Justin Marks (The Jungle Book) and Eric Warren Singer (American Gustle) wrote the screenplay. Cruise is also producing the project with Jerry Bruckheimer (Pirates of the Caribbean, Armageddon) and David Ellison (Mission: Impossible – Rogue Nation). Zimmer has previously scored the Cruise-produced Mission: Impossible II and The Last Samurai, as well as numerous movies produced by Bruckheimer, including the Cruise-starring Days of Thunder. The sequel is set to be released on June 26, 2020 by Paramount Pictures.

 

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Sounds like a perfect collaboration to me, although I wouldn't have objected to Faltermeyer doing it solo either.

 

At least we'll finally get a TOP GUN score release, even if it isn't the original we all crave. Hopefully, anyway.

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  • 11 months later...

My first introduction to Faltermeyer's music was not through one of his classic 80s movies, but through this horrendous remix featuring a bizarre frog with a dangling penis that inexplicably was a success on the mid-2000s:

 

 

Only years later I watched Beverly Hills Cop and recognized the theme.

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  • 2 months later...
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Top Gun: Maverick Release Date Moved Up by Paramount

 

According to Deadline, Paramount Pictures has changed the release date for director Joseph Kosinski’s highly-anticipated aviation sequel Top Gun: Maverick. Originally set to debut on June 26, the Tom Cruise-led film will now hit the theaters on Wednesday, June 24. The film was previously scheduled to go up against Warner Bros. Pictures’ In the Heights film, but now Top Gun: Maverick will no longer have any competition on its new release date.

 

Top Gun: Maverick is set in a world of drone technology and fifth-generation fighters along with exploring the end of the era of dogfighting. Maverick (once again played by Tom Cruise) is now a flight instructor, who takes Bradley Bradshaw (played by Miles Teller), the son of Maverick’s late partner Nick “Goose” Bradshaw, under his wing. The film also stars Jon Hamm, Val Kilmer, Jennifer Connelly, Glen Powell and Ed Harris.

 

Joseph Kosinski, who previously directed Cruise in Oblivion, will helm the sequel, with Peter Craig, Justin Marks and Eric Warren Singer penning the script.

 

https://www.comingsoon.net/movies/news/1125084-top-gun-maverick-sets-new-release-date-two-days-earlier

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11 hours ago, Thor said:

 

Damn. I had looked forward to this premiering on my birthday.

Just move your birthday :)

 

 

 

 

On 12/16/2019 at 2:23 PM, His Royal Noelness said:

Does it have Danger Zone and a P-51?

P-51! Cadillac of the sky!!!!!

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Interesting comment from Tina Guo, who worked on the film:

 

"Top Gun was a little bit more traditional because it was fully orchestrated. There were a lot of melodies from the first movie that appeared."

 

https://composer.spitfireaudio.com/en/articles/tina-guo-on-her-journey-to-musical-ascendancy-collaborating-with-hans-zimmer

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I’m excited for this film and score, I’m less excited to have had to wait three years for it!

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So Lorne Balfe is actually credited as a "Score Producer" on this film. What does that even mean?

 

So who do we actually credit this film's score to? Harold Faltermeyer? Florian Faltermeyer? Hans Zimmer? Lorne Balfe? Andrew Kawcznski? This is pretty confusing.

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10 hours ago, zoidar said:

So Lorne Balfe is actually credited as a "Score Producer" on this film. What does that even mean?

 

So who do we actually credit this film's score to? Harold Faltermeyer? Florian Faltermeyer? Hans Zimmer? Lorne Balfe? Andrew Kawcznski? This is pretty confusing.

I’m pretty sure “Score Producer” is Zimmer’s code for “this is a co-composer but I’m not allowed to say that”. So I guess the current outlook is a collaboration between Faltermeyer, Zimmer, and Balfe.

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Zimmer was credited as "producer" on the score for the first POTC movie, but he ended up writing a big chunk of that score, including (I think) the main theme. Years later, Balfe received the "score produced by" credit on Sherlock Holmes but apparently he ghostwrote a lot of cues (which only makes Zimmer's Oscar nom for that movie really weird).

 

So yeah, "producer" in this case is a fancy synonym of "additional composer".

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10 hours ago, zoidar said:

So Lorne Balfe is actually credited as a "Score Producer" on this film. What does that even mean?

 

He watched them do it while he was writing Mission Impossible 14.

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 15/03/2022 at 9:42 AM, Stark said:

I’m pretty sure “Score Producer” is Zimmer’s code for “this is a co-composer but I’m not allowed to say that”. So I guess the current outlook is a collaboration between Faltermeyer, Zimmer, and Balfe.

Well that really clears things up! Thanks a lot

 

I really hope the score for this one is good. I have a love-hate relationship with Zimmer. And Balfe is usually not my cup of tea. 

 

I just hope it doesn't sound like autopilot RCP (something that just sounds like reused cues from Transformers or Terminator Genisys or The Dark Knight)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Bananarama for Dune: Part 2!

 

My pop references only go back so far.

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Sounds like basically that her song ends up being integrated a lot in the score for her to warrant this sort of credit 

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I do like when songs are used as themes (as in the middle three Transformers films, for example), so I am not against this.

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On 14/3/2022 at 6:48 PM, Edmilson said:

Zimmer was credited as "producer" on the score for the first POTC movie, but he ended up writing a big chunk of that score, including (I think) the main theme. Years later, Balfe received the "score produced by" credit on Sherlock Holmes but apparently he ghostwrote a lot of cues (which only makes Zimmer's Oscar nom for that movie really weird).

 

So yeah, "producer" in this case is a fancy synonym of "additional composer".

I think I’ve decided that the name Hans Zimmer will be treated in my mind as nothing more than a collectively agreed-upon pseudonym for the ad hoc team of composers that works on any given “Hans Zimmer” score. Kinda like the way the anonymous folks behind bitcoin hide behind the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto. To judge a Zimmer score as a solo effort makes no more sense than judging the writing ability of a newspaper editor-in-chief based on the quality or content of the articles in his/her newspaper. It can’t be done. 

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7 hours ago, Bayesian said:

I think I’ve decided that the name Hans Zimmer will be treated in my mind as nothing more than a collectively agreed-upon pseudonym for the ad hoc team of composers that works on any given “Hans Zimmer” score. Kinda like the way the anonymous folks behind bitcoin hide behind the pseudonym Satoshi Nakamoto. To judge a Zimmer score as a solo effort makes no more sense than judging the writing ability of a newspaper editor-in-chief based on the quality or content of the articles in his/her newspaper. It can’t be done. 

This has been one of JWFan's biggest topics of discussion - how much music Zimmer wrote on his own scores and how much was written by assistants?

 

From what I know, I think it depends from score to score. In some of them he has a more hands-on approach and writes large portions of it (Interstellar and Dune, for example), in others he writes just a theme or two and let the Zimlings do the job (like in any DreamWorks animation credited to him), but in most of them it's, as you said, a team work.

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I tried making this particular point in a different thread (before the person I spoke to misunderstood me), but there's generally too much of Zimmer's own DNA throughout most of his scores to where it can be that easy to pick out moments where it definitely isn't him. You have to be super dedicated to the whole RCP empire to pick out the little things that sound more like the supporting crew, but even that's subject to much scrutiny when very few tidbits have been confirmed or heavily rumored. After a certain point: you just decide there's no point in figuring it out and simply enjoy the music regardless of who did what.

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7 hours ago, Mephariel said:

 

Film music fans remain the last strange group of movie fans who still can't accept collaboration.

 

Blame it on the marketing :)

 

If a soundtrack CD said 'Score produced by Composer A', and the back cover contained the names of 5 composers, I don't think this would be such an issue with us.

 

But it says 'Music composed by Composer A'. In cases of ghostwriting/co-composing where at least one other person has composed, that's simply untrue.

 

And because our bunch puts so much emphasis on seeing our beloved composers' names on the cover, we're naturally going to assume things based on what we read.

 

'Music by ...' is more vague, but still carries an implication of an individual. 

 

Whereas a 'Directed by' credit is not making a statement about having done every last job on the film, and of course film credits list everyone who worked on the film. I don't think the two can be entirely compared.

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