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  1. I've had this gem since Friday. I haven't had much time recently – also for contributing to this fantastic forum – because I'm engrossed in caring for my two-year-old twins while trying to work in the journalistic profession, but I managed to watch it twice anyway. And I'm delighted, the memories from three months ago came back, when I was at two concerts, on Friday and Saturday. The impression is better than with the shredded version from the Digital Concert Hall. The concert lasts 115 minutes. Yes, the ovations are a little shortened here, but it was the same with the Vienna concert, there is no speech before the "Jurassic Park", there is no Williams' last thanks from Saturday before the "Flying Theme", and no fifteen-minute ovation at the end - but this is understandable. The concert itself looks and sounds fantastic and although Vienna will always have a special place in my heart, because I saw Maestro live there for the first time, but if I had to choose one concert to show someone who doesn't know or hear Williams, I would bet on Berlin. The sound from Blu-ray is stunning (although I don't have Dolby Atmos, just the usual 5.1), I haven't listened to the CD yet. The whole thing is beautifully presented - I am attaching a few photos. The 24-page booklet is in English and German. As you can see, the CD and Blu-ray audio versions are without applauses or speeches. It would probably be nice if some extra interview with the Maestro was included, or at least a short conversation with musicians from the Berlin Philharmonic, posted on the Digital Concert Hall. After all, the most important thing is the concert, and it looks wonderful here! We are really lucky to have this masterpiece forever, along with the one from Vienna. Until a few years ago, most of us didn't even dare to dream about something like that. An absolute treat!!
    9 points
  2. I feel like it made sense to go in a fresh musical direction for shows like Mandalorian, because we're seeing a new character and there's no established musical framework. Very different with Obi-Wan Kenobi. Williams scored him in six different films so there's an established musical identity (even though his theme technically morphed into the Force Theme). Not sure I want to hear the Force Theme re-interpolated with modern, new-age sensibilities. It's stately and elegant, encapsulating the mysticism of the Jedi. There's great musical potential exploring that theme during the darkest timeline, where Jedi are being hunted down and eradicated.
    8 points
  3. What happened is that the sensibility of current directors and producers changed a lot. They don't want long-lined melodies, they don't want counterpoint, virtuosic writing or a sophisticated approach. They prefer something much simpler and devoided of any musical complexity. Why? Because the music should never get in the way of their vision, nor the composer is someone allowed to impose his or her own vision to the film. Music is just one color of the filmmaker's palette and he or she wants to have total control over it. Now, of course you can be both simple and musically creative while serving the picture, but the issue is that, more often than not, this approach doesn't produce something interesting enough as music. I don't judge Giacchino here (I listened to this new piece only once without my full attention, so I'll avoid any quick judgement), but I fear that even big name composers like him today are somewhat cornered by producers and directors to write pieces along these lines, i.e. all atmosphere without a defined melodic or thematic personality. The music does create a halo around the images, but it never takes full control (despite being often mixed at impossibly loud volume). I read somwehere that Giacchino wrote this piece before filming began so I guess that he sketched some basic ideas to get the ball rolling, then the filmmakers fell in love with the demo and decided it had to be the theme and that's what he had to work with (that's my assumption, of course). I mean, these processes are always hard to fathom from the outside. I know of top composers submitting demos to producers and then being asked to strip down the composition to the point that sometimes what remains at the end is just the bass line. The review process can be really frustrating for the composer. Also, the majority of the audience of today is not at all welcoming a film score with a clear musical voice (in the sense of the traditional orchestral vernacular) because a lot of people feels like it's dated and taking too much attention to itself, as a sophisticated harmonic language for example is now seen as something really from the past. You have to read the comments on YouTube under music videos or tracks to truly realize how today's audience thinks and feels about music that is just a notch more sophisticated than the average pop piece (a guy on YT labeled one of Adele's songs from the latest album as "something out of an old Disney movie" just because the piece uses jazzy chords and a more spiced-up harmonic vocabulary). That's the world we live in today. Sorry for the long post.
    8 points
  4. I finally got around to listening to it... WHERE THE FUCK IS THE TRAIN CUE?! Who's the moron that decided not to include it? And what about Boba's hallucination? It's like they purposely left off half of the highlights... but yet they just had to include the Mod Parlour source.
    8 points
  5. Before digging into the score proper, it’s probably best to begin by dissecting Göransson’s end credits track, which was released as a single alongside the first episode. Bear in mind that it has been hard to make any clear distinction between what each of the different parts of the piece represent, so the assigned titles are merely for the sake of differentiation at this point. These don't necessarily need to be themes for anything in particular, but I've tried my best to come up with appropriate names for the time being. They will be updated later on if need be. The track begins with a shanty-like repeating phrase, which we'll call the Buccaneer theme because a) it sounds more than a little pirate-y and b) that was the working title for the show. This idea has appeared over all the title cards thus far, much like the simple "Western" piano motif in Mando. The next section kicks in at 0:20, with those wonderfully bold vocals taking up the "Main" theme (it's no more or less integral than any of the other melodies here but I don't know what else to call it just yet...stay tuned). There are two main phrases followed by a B section at 0:56, complete with little trumpet accents. A brief vocal segue at 1:09 sets up the choral Tribe Fanfare at 1:14. This idea appears to be most connected to Boba's experiences with the sand people, and also mirrors the structure of the Mando credits by breaking out in a way that's similar to the Razor Crest Fanfare. The second phrase is touched up by brass and strings rather nicely. At 1:49, the Reborn theme emerges on brass, with a second statement at 2:08 backed by vocals. The piece proceeds to close the way it began, with a bombastic outro for the Buccaneer theme repeating from 2:29 to the end. Aside from all of these, there is also Boba's Jaunty Riff from Mando S2, the Desert Fanfare which played over the post-credits scene teaser (and coincidentally sounds very similar to a decidedly exotic version of the Recorder Riff from Chapter 9 of Mando, which can be compared here), as well as a slew of organic noises and breathy sounds that act as interchangeable calling cards for the character. Now without further ado, let's take a look at what this first volume has to offer! 01. Rebirth (3:16) This makes for a decent album opener, all things considered, underscoring the show's prologue with rumbling strings and otherworldly shimmers. Vocals emerge at 0:50 along with Boba's wind stinger, giving way to a short string lament before veering into harsher sound design. Percussive thumps and tambourine cut through the chaos, with chord outlines of the Reborn theme setting the stage for the first big statement, which comes as Boba emerges from the sarlacc pit at 2:40. 02. The Stranger (3:01) A mysterious harp intro continues the first episode's lengthy flashback opening, with a fantastic combination of vocals, percussion, and all manner of strange sounds and effects accompanying the Tuskens first appearance as they capture (rescue?) our dazed bounty hunter. The Reborn theme returns at 1:03, eventually growing in size for a second statement. A strummed rendition of the Buccaneer theme follows, complete with vocal dressings. The varied instrumentation blends together wonderfully, connecting these ideas with ease before the Reborn theme emerges again at 1:53, with some off-kilter development beginning around 2:15. The Buccaneer theme returns on cellos over the first title card with big supporting brass chords. The whole cue is an excellent sampler of the score's sound and style, and makes good use of Göransson’s themes to boot. 03. Normal Day at the Office (2:41) Big brass hits and electronics help Boba to suit up with style, donning his armour as he prepares to receive tribute from several colourful characters. The track then moves into rather low-key and lighthearted dialogue underscore. A sneaky pizzicato version of the Desert Fanfare plays at 0:50. The relatively laid back sound continues until the end, with some light string touches grounding the quirky plucked passages. 04. Fear Is a Sure Bet (3:48) The first action set piece of the show is a little underwhelming, relying on largely abrasive electronics to underscore a standoff and chase scene. The Desert Fanfare clears the space for the Jaunty Riff at 1:16, with trembling strings repeating the Desert Fanfare from 1:30 and on. More anonymous action follows, and overlapping strands of the Desert Fanfare appear briefly again at 1:58. For the most part, this is not a particularly notable cue, and the absence of Chapter 2's far superior train sequence on this volume only makes it more of a headscratcher inclusion. 05. Desert Walk (3:00) It's been observed by some that the music in the flashbacks has had an exponentially greater effect in episode than what the present timeline offers, and these first few tracks are certainly a testament to that. With this cue, Boba and a fellow prisoner are taken into the desert to harvest melons. A fun statement of the Reborn theme emerges at 0:37, complete with mariachi-esque trumpets, vocals, and guitar strums and shimmers. Eerie strings and electronics provide a brief interlude, before a neat mixture of percussion and echoing effects close the track. 06. Boba's Throne (3:45) A slithery string line opens before Boba's distinct sounds join in with muted trumpets. The atmosphere becomes noisier, with very little of note until the Buccaneer theme flashes by at 2:35. Hints of the Jaunty Riff and the Desert Fanfare round out the cue. 07. The Twins (4:37) Intriguingly, there's a repeating diegetic drum throughout this track which seems to follow the Hutts around on their litter. Menacing muted trumpets and distorted vocals underscore the twins' appearance in the city square. An uplifting major-key variation on the Reborn theme starts at 2:59, with a smattering of vocals and effects closing the track. 08. Stop That Train (4:06) Deep strings, electronics, and percussion follow an impending threat through the desert as Boba's tribe scrambles to defend themselves from a speeding train. Some neat processed vocals join in at 0:55, with the mood then becoming more somber as Boba and company burn their dead. Soulful vocals chant beneath the solemn Reborn theme at 1:43. The track switches to another cue at 2:25 as Boba takes a pack of stolen speeders back to the tribe. The dynamic Buccaneer theme opens for a particularly upbeat statement of the "Main" theme, with energetic string and vocal accompaniments. The cue gradually plays down from there on. 09. Like a Bantha (2:02) This is one of the rare set pieces in the show that actually runs with a pretty good idea for a little while. Boba trains the Tuskens how to ride speeders as a malleable montage melody works beneath. The idea appears in one or two other scenes in the episode, although it remains rather brief despite being a clear highlight. 10. The Ultimate Boon (5:07) This second chapter seems to have been really good for strong music-driven stretches, and this track is the pinnacle of that. The entire ritual scene is handed over to Shirley, and he delivers his best work on the show thus far. It's perfectly measured and not overplayed, with expert implementation of Göransson's themes to signify some genuine character growth. Long and low vocals hum the Reborn theme at 0:10, returning at 0:53 over processed plucks and shimmers. An exotic wind sound bridges into a reverent choral rendition of the Tribe Fanfare at 1:44, which is then carried up by solo cello at 2:08. Boba emerges from the chief's tent with his new garments, the music maintaining the power and resonance with a controlled brass build-up. The piece then transitions into the next section, with serious strains of the Reborn theme following Boba to the desert workshop at 2:51. The melody changes shape and progresses further at 3:22, building in anticipation before the vocals join at 3:52. It is here that Shirley combines the Reborn theme and the Tribe Fanfare together to form a fully satisfying climax, with an emotional vocalic/wind effect tastefully tying the journey together at 4:35. The entire sequence is the closest the show has gotten to the heights of Mando, and Shirley's major contribution is certainly worthy of comparison to any of Göransson's narratively similar forging cues. Without a doubt, this is the best track on the album! 11. Aliit Ori’shya Tal’din (6:12) Organic breaths and sorrowful strings mark the beginning of another highlight passage as Boba begins his next set of flashbacks. A brass reference to the Reborn theme appears at 0:31, and vocals prepare the way for a travelling sequence at 0:49. The "Main" theme plays on strings atop the humming choir at 0:56, increasing in confidence and energy at 1:16 as Boba rides a bantha into town. A short interlude separates the B section, which is heard for the first time in the show proper at 1:50. The music settles under a cautious dialogue with the Pyke leader, and a slightly unsteady variation of the Reborn theme adds to the menacing tone at 3:16. The standout choral lament begins at 3:56 as Boba finds the tribe massacred. Fascinatingly, a Redditor supposedly translated the lyrics to what is perhaps the most explicitly religious-sounding piece of music in any Star Wars media. It's an unexpected attention to detail but very cool nonetheless! 12. Road Rage (4:56) After a string of surefire highlights, the album meanders back into decidedly mediocre territory. Peppy techno electronics and brass hits do well to compliment a goofy chase through the streets of Mos Espa, with passing appearances from the Jaunty Riff and the Desert Fanfare marking Boba's presence. The processed wailing and dangerous string lines from Stop That Train return fittingly as a group of Pykes land on Tatooine. 13. The Mod Parlour (3:04) This wacky techno piece for the impromptu chop shop operation in Chapter 4 more than speaks for itself. I'm happy for anyone who enjoys it though! 14. Fennec and Boba (2:08) Brass and vocals are initially prominent before giving way to a far sneakier setting, with passing references to some familiar Fennec-related material from Chapter 5 of Mando (the string idea at 0:22 and 0:52 should be familiar). Low-key pizzicato exercises accompany Fennec's spy droid at 1:13 and continue for the remainder of the cue. 15. You Fly, I'll Shoot (5:34) Boba and Fennec attempt to reclaim his ship from Jabba's palace. A mishmash of electronics, breath sounds, and tense strings underscore a firefight in the hangar. The track notably manages to stay athematic until the bay door finally opens at 3:01, at which point full-bodied choir hums the Reborn theme at its most triumphant. Several more statements follow until the up-tempo Jaunty Riff interrupts at 4:09, ushering in the Desert Fanfare at 4:32 as Boba annihilates the biker gang from above. 16. The Families of Mos Espa (5:33) The final score cue on the album is fairly standard dialogue music. The Jaunty Riff picks up the energy a little bit at 1:32, and an angular variation of the Desert Fanfare slides in at 2:44, returning beneath percussion at 4:12. The most ear-catching bit is, of course, the Recorder Riff cameo at 5:10, which intermingles with the earlier-mentioned "Western" motif. Perhaps this tease will help to open things up a bit and give the score some real legs through the final few chapters? For now we can only guess. All other impressions aside, there's plenty to potentially look forward to, as the finales have been far and away the best-scored episodes in these shows to this point. Fingers crossed! It’s interesting to note that aside from Göransson’s themes (both new and old), there are essentially no other leitmotifs to track across episodes like there has been consistently with Mando. What's there is excellent and has certainly led to some elevated passages, no doubt about it, but the fact remains that the show's musical identity is defined by fairly limited thematic tissue, and there have been a number of occasions where the score in episode has noticeably lacked punch and fallen flat as a result. If anything, it's more of a textural approach than Mando ever was. As a result, the nature of the release as well as the music itself is not as easily tailored to an in-depth analysis as might have been anticipated, but I hope these notes prove useful to anyone who is enjoying the music and is trying to keep tabs on the fresh catalogue of themes. As always, I look forward to hearing what comes next. Thanks for reading and cheers!
    7 points
  6. I mean, I'll step in to disagree about Elfman's Spidey theme not being perfect because that Main Title had everything we needed: a sense of mystery, wonder, creeping, rising, skittering strings, web-slinging, responsibility, solemnity. Mostly Spider-man with a touch of Peter Parker (being born out of the responsibility theme rather than birthing the responsibility theme itself, as it does more regularly in the score proper). There's a wealth of thematic material being demonstrated in 3:30 minutes. That one cue is almost a micro-score within itself. If that were the only musical depiction of Spider-man we had, those 3:30, we'd have quite a lot to pick apart and I think that says a lot about what Elfman does. I simply can't avoid an opportunity to lift up the Elfman Spider-man theme which doesn't get enough love imo.
    7 points
  7. Yeah, it’s very evident whoever put out the bootleg only had the audio without any knowledge of what each track actually was. Here’s what I came up with: 1 Overture / Main Theme from Boston Pops recording ‘Music for Stage and Screen’ 2 Prologue 1M1 Acting Out The Future 3 Wargames 1M1A Earliest Memories 4 The Early Days, Massapequa 1M5 Early Days 5 High School 0:00-0:30 2M2 The Call To Duty 0:30-1:52 2M3 Recruiting Scene 1:52-end 2M4 After The Soda Shoppe 6 The Shooting Of Wilson 4M2 The Shooting Of Wilson 7 Patrolling the Fields 5MA Approaching the Village 8 Cua Viet River, Vietnam 0:00-0:31 5M1 (New Start) Ron Is Hit 0:31-end 5M1 Ron Is Hit 9 Back In The Neighborhood 7M1 The Homecoming 10 The Parade / Timmy 0:00-0:58 1M1 Acting Out The Future 0:58-end unknown 11 The Syracuse Rally 10M1 Campus Rally 12 Villa Dulce 0:00-0:30 11M2 (Revised?) To Mexico 0:30-end unknown 13 Unfinished Letters 12M8 Writing The Wilsons 14 Homecoming 0:00-0:55 13M1 To Georgia 0:55-end 13M1 Insert 15 Miami Confrontation 0:00-1:15 15M1 Convention Disturbance 1:15-end unknown 16 The Democratic Convention 15M3 Short Version 17 End Titles End Credits 18 Prologue (Alternate) unknown 19 The Early Days, Massapequa (Alternate) from Boston Pops recording ‘Music for Stage and Screen’ 20 High School (Alternate) 0:00-0:33 2M3 Recruiting Scene 0:33-end unknown 21 Cua Viet River, Vietnam (Alternate) from Boston Pops recording ‘Music for Stage and Screen’ 22 Ron’s Speech 12M8 Writing The Wilsons [a different take than track 13] 23 Timmy (Alternate) 12M7 Montage Of Girls 24 The Syracuse Convention (Alternate) 15M2 The 1972 Convention 25 Remembering Vietnam 15M3 Alternate 26 Miami Confrontation (Alternate) 15M2 The 1972 Convention [starting in the middle, with an added pickup note] 27 The Democratic Convention, NYC (Alternate) Ron’s Theme 28 Victory 2M1 On The Mat 29 Epilogue 1MX Trumpet Prologue w/ annoying, out-of-time snare drum overlay 30 End Titles (Alternate) City of Prague Philharmonic re-recording @TownerFan Are you able to fill in any of the gaps? That leaves these cues are missing, but as to whether they were actually recorded, I couldn’t tell you: 1M1 Alt - Kids At Play 8M3X Parade Overlay 12M5 Shopping For Present Also, 1M1 has another section of music written after the opening trumpet fanfare that’s not present here.
    7 points
  8. I believe 30 is also not an alternate but rather a Silva Screen/City of Prague Phil. re-recording, with an unfortunate dialogue excerpt tacked onto its end. Also, the version of the main theme featured on a 2-track CD promo, a 2-CD MCA Records promo compilation of film score and songs named "Reel Music", and the music video released at the time of the film is also not included on the boot, nor the OST. Several years ago, I married a rip of the 2-track promo CD with the music video:
    7 points
  9. A number of track titles for the upcoming album release have been identified via AHA Song Finder. Here's what the extension was able to pick up on so far: CHAPTER 1 Rebirth - The flashback prologue, up until Boba escapes from the sarlacc. The Stranger - Boba is picked up by the sand people and the first title card appears. Normal Day at the Office - Boba suits up for the first time and visitors pay tribute to him. Fear Is a Sure Bet - Assassins ambush Boba and Fennec. Desert Walk - Boba and another prisoner are taken into the desert to search for those sand melons. CHAPTER 2 The Twins - The two hutts confront Boba in the town square. Stop That Train - The train attacks the Tuskens and they burn their dead. Like a Bantha - Boba trains the sand people to ride speeders. The Ultimate Boon - Boba gets his new clothes and makes his staff. CHAPTER 3 Aliit Ori'shya Tal'din - Boba journeys across the desert on a bantha, visits the Pykes, and returns to find the tribe massacred. Road Rage – The major-domo attempts to escape and the Pykes arrive on Tatooine. CHAPTER 4 The Mod Parlour - A weird techno source/score cue for the chop shop where Fennec is healed. Fennec and Boba - The pair travel to Jabba's palace. That little spy droid locates Boba's ship. You Fly, I’ll Shoot - Boba and Fennec get his ship back from Jabba's palace. The Families of Mos Espa - I don't know what the rest of this cue could be but this is the title I got for the big hint at the end of this episode. The only thing I'm worried about is the train heist cue from Chapter 2. I haven't been getting any results for it, although there are a lot of SFX in the way. Otherwise everything of note seems to be covered here. I haven't had any luck with Shazam thus far but if it does pick up anything we might be able to see if there's more based on the track IDs. I'm not really sure how that works but I think that's what we did last year.
    7 points
  10. Jay

    Knives Out

    ‘Knives Out 2’ Expected to Drop in Late 2022, Fall Festival Debut Likely
    6 points
  11. “Like a bantha.” From S01E02, it has apparently become a popular meme. There are many more to be found, just google if you want a (sad) laugh. It is undoubtedly one of the worst scenes ever. Sad how they have destroyed a cool character like Boba Fett and turned him into this. Moving on, I am caught up on S01E03. It is continuously ñ lacking in quality, but the chase scene was exceptionally bad. It was slow, horribly slow. And what is up with Boba’s new gang - each in their own color with their own “tricks” - it felt like it belonged in a Harry Potter LEGO movie more than anything else. Also, I am glad that I am not the only one who’s deprived mind had this thought during the chase scene.
    5 points
  12. Just annouced, no word about John's presence, but one can assume, he'll be there https://www.bso.org/events/john-williams-90th Aug 20, 2022, 8:00pm EDT Tanglewood celebrates the 90th birthday of one of its most beloved figures, John Williams, in a special program featuring a selection of his incomparable concert music composed for the BSO and Boston Pops, along with beloved film themes. Join the BSO and an all-star lineup of exceptional guest artists as they salute this inimitable musical icon in an evening of brilliant music and special surprises. Tickets will be for sale on March 10, 2022 10:00am EST
    5 points
  13. Wowzers! So I am sure I listened to this score when I got the blue box in 2008, but for whatever reason, I didn't take to it, and have neglected it ever since. That is, until I listened to Maurizio's great podcast episode about Alexander Courage, which was peppered with many cuts from this score. I REALLY liked what I heard, like was pretty blown away. So I quickly took the LLL edition I had bought but not opened yet and put it in my car with a bunch of other CDs I wanted to open up and listen to. I finally listened to it on work commutes this week. HOLY HELL! What a score! Right away I was seriously impressed by the thematic work. Those early tracks that include the Superman theme, the love theme, the Krypton theme, the Smallville theme, even the flying to Earth music, etc etc, so damn cool! The score effortlessly slides between a ton of old themes and all the new ones with remarkable ease - it all sounds so natural. Courage really took the thematic bed and made everything his own. Then you get the new themes JW wrote integrating it, as well as Courage's own themes, and it all continues to work. He makes the Villains march cooler here than it ever was in the first score! I loved this, this is is amazing. Like, it's low key one of the best film scores of the 80s? I can't wait to listen again. Oh, and also, the two hour run time of the score flies by! There are no dull moments or generic cues, it's two solid hours of good music. (oh... there's also 32 minutes of Paul Fishman source music at the end of the second disc.... I do not intend to listen to that stuff again. Yikes!)
    5 points
  14. Well, it's *also* about the musical flow. Those edits are abrupt, technically and musically. They're perhaps not musically distracting if you don't know the alternative, but they are if you do. You can always argue that the full cue has irrelevant bits that should be cut for a better musical flow (with any musical work, you always have a trade-off between being too elaborate (musically or otherwise) and being too reduced - Strauss and Hoffmansthal make a point of that in Ariadne auf Naxos). But even then you have to weigh that against the effect of cutting it out and what it does to the music, and that's also a trade-off - and one that I often find isn't worth it. Coming from the other side (first being familiar with an album and then speaking out against an expansion because it's been just fine as it was, a rather popular argument in recent times) I find also deceptive: Just because a shortened cue seems fine (or even *is* fine) without closer comparison to the original doesn't mean it's superior, or that the longer version is inferior - not even if at first the original version seems "wrong". Whatever version you're used to can distort how you feel about the other one unless/until you're familiar with both. Sometimes both are fine, sometimes the shortened version is preferrable, sometimes the longer one - in general I usually find the longer versions harmless at the very least (as long as we're speaking of scores of a high musical quality) and shortened versions more often than not to have more downsides than they're worth, even if most of what they drop may not be "important". Or to put it differently: For a concert suite presentation, it may be good to rewrite these kinds of cues and remove the "downtimes", but then you'd also do more restructuring and make the changed thing work again. Simply editing the existing recording of the music as written doesn't achieve that as often as it's claimed, I think, and at the same time is often harmful to the music's integrity.
    5 points
  15. I feel the same way about Walker’s Batman theme as I do about her Superman theme: a great companion to its film inspiration but definitely not better than the film theme. Which is not meant to diminish her work in any way!
    5 points
  16. With every day passing I feel more lucky that we were able to experience this concert. It seems John Williams came to Berlin in that small window of time when COVID was not really high in Germany. I feel that two or three weeks after, the concert would not have happened.
    5 points
  17. Seven Years in Tibet (1997) 01 Seven Years In Tibet 7:07 15M3 End Credit 02 Young Dalai Lama and Ceremonial Chant 2:17 1M5 Young Dalai Lama (Cue B) 03 Leaving Ingrid 3:43 1M3 (Insert) Leaving Ingrid (Old Cue A) 04 Peter’s Rescue 3:45 0:00-1:17 1M3A The Rescue of Peter 1:17-2:05 5M5A Escaping the Bandits 2:05-end 13M2 The Tibetan Defeat 05 Harrer’s Journey 4:02 0:00-0:53 3M1 Transported to Prison 0:53-2:10 5M6 Horsemeat and Rescue 2:10-end 3M7 The Second Escape 06 The Invasion 5:07 0:00-1:47 13M1 Preparing the Defense 1:47-2:38 3M11 Stealing Food 2:38-3:06 11M9A The Generals Enter 3:06-end 13M3 The Chinese Takeover 07 Reflections 4:41 0:00-1:36 1M5 Young Dalai Lama (Cue B) 1:36-end 11M4 Prophetic Dream 08 Premonitions 2:54 The Child of Tibet 09 Approaching the Summit 5:43 0:00-0:44 7M1AX The Capitol City 0:44-2:19 1M7 Meeting the Sherpa 2:19-4:40 1M3 Leaving Ingrid (Cue A) 4:40-end 5M2 Sixty-Eight Kilometers 10 Palace Invitation 4:43 0:00-0:47 7M3 Western Clothes 0:47-end 9M3 Meeting the Dali 11 Heinrich’s Odyssey 8:03 0:00-0:41 13M11 The Dali Lama’s Investiture 0:41-end 5M5 Heinrich’s Slow Growth 12 Quiet Moments 4:21 0:00-0:57 11M10 Praying Through A Telescope 0:57-2:38 3M4 The Barbed Wire Scene (Cue C) 2:38-end 9M1 Thinking by the Water 13 Regaining a Son 1:48 15M2 Regaining A Son (new) 14 Seven Years In Tibet (Reprise) 7:10 15M3 End Credit
    5 points
  18. I want Varese to do Season by Season complete boxsets for ALIAS and LOST and FRINGE And Intrada to do the same for THE MANDALORIAN and THE BOOK OF BOBA FETT And La-La Land Records to do the same for THE ORVILLE But none of this will ever happen
    5 points
  19. In this article it mentions he will be the guest of honor. Also the birthday dinner to big sponsors they will raise a glass to John. For such big sponsors he'll be there unless something happens. I'm sure all his scoring duties are being all added to his calendar so it all works out fine. Since some of these donors will be spending $50,000, he'll be there and I'm sure his schedule is being tweaked to make sure he's there for such big donors. Also he'll be doing a pre-concert Q&A the following day June 24th for the Jurassic Park concert. He'll be there unless he's sick or something, god forbid and knock on wood. https://www.kennedy-center.org/news-room/press-release-landing-page/the-kennedy-center-and-national-symphony-orchestra--announce-the-john-williams-90th-birthday-celebration/
    5 points
  20. ^Completely agree with Crumbs. The more "modern" approach works perfectly for The Mandalorian and now The Book of Boba Fett. That same style (or any major difference from the film scores in general) just won't work for this series I imagine. They need a more traditional score for this show, especially now if Vader/Anakin will be in it as well. I'll be extremely disappointed if this series is literally just The Mandalorian but starring Obi-Wan.
    4 points
  21. Hi everyone - as with the other two films, we've posted some demos today from the temp score to show some other ideas we'd wanted to try and/or what inspired the final version. There's some James Newton Howard and Benjamin Wallfisch as well as other Williams material that fit the scenes, found on the Temp Demos page. Hope you enjoy!
    4 points
  22. I think this show is running on the fumes of the success of The Mandalorian, and little else. The problem simply put is that Boba Fett (as originally portrayed) wasn't really a character. He's a guy in a suit who says very little and looks mysterious and intimidating and that's about all the intrigue of his character. The Clone Wars series did give him more development by way of seeking revenge on Mace Windu, but then, as far as the main canon is concerned he becomes a bounty hunter and then we see him employed by Vader later on. After his experience with the Tuskens it puts his moral compass out of whack, leaving us wondering whether this is the same hardened bounty hunter and questioning why he wants to rule Mos Espa. The other problem is the god-awful direction (cinematographically and the direction of the story) and this seems to stem from an issue I've had with the MCU which was apparent through some of Mandalorian in how these shows are made to basically set up a factory line of future shows, and it's sad to see Star Wars mined for content in this way. Robert Rodriguez's style doesn't gel with Star Wars, and makes it look more cartoon-y than the actual cartoon series in how slapstick some of the scenes are. The vespa chase and that whole Mod gang are ridiculously embarrassing and contrast so heavily with Boba and the vibe of Tatooine that they seem out of place. I'm still sticking with the show, but I can't see this going beyond a second season without more momentum and a driving force behind it.
    4 points
  23. We all evolve. 10 years ago, I never ate candy bars with a knife and fork. What a fool I was.
    4 points
  24. Maybe track 21's name is a spoiler? Buck Wild's Noble End
    4 points
  25. So listening to it a few times, it is extremely basic, simple, and unimaginative. It will serve its purpose in the film I imagine. It is just rising notes. There is no real sense of a memorable theme. These are as simplistic structures and figures as the ones Zimmer used. I daresay Junkie XL showed greater facility with melody in Snyder Cut. First Spider Man and now this - both extremely simple (and simplistic) themes. Don't composers acquire more virtuosity with age - more refinement? Gia seems to be losing it. Listen to a score like Ratatouille for Gia starting out - bursting with melodies - complex, long-lined, nimble, many notes, fast tempi, counterpoint nuance, instrumental variety, imagination, wit, humor. Where is any of it today? He's like I have said, a heartbeat away from RCP power anthem level stuff. What happened?
    4 points
  26. An almost 7 minute theme track is now available in any country where it is already Friday 01 The Batman (6:47) https://music.apple.com/nz/album/the-batman-from-the-batman-single/1603609255
    4 points
  27. I imagine the version heard on the promos and in the music video was recorded during the original sessions, or was produced shortly thereafter. It seems this version is amped up with some "sweeteners" (synth, likely) compared to the OST version. The 2-track promo was released in '89, the same year as the film and OST... And "Reel Music" was released around '91 (it features a cue from Silence of the Lambs which appears to be the most recent film represented in the set; the CDs came in a metal film can)...
    4 points
  28. Edmilson

    Music Box Records

    Music Box Records will release an expanded edition of Christopher Gunning's La Vie en Rose: http://filmmusicreporter.com/2022/01/18/expanded-la-vie-en-rose-soundtrack-album-announced/
    4 points
  29. Even if he did provide something, it definitely sounds like it was trailer-ized after the fact
    4 points
  30. Well that episode was clearly the best so far! Almost felt like an entirely different show, such was the assured direction and efficiency of the storytelling. It was pretty obvious Rodriguez didn't direct this from the opening minutes; credit to the new director because he largely resolved almost every criticism I had with episodes 1 and 3! For starters, this was the first episode that felt like it was shot in real locations or real sets, instead of inside the volume. The cinematography was noticeably more dynamic and cinematic. There was a better flow to the editing; the flashback section felt organic and resolved, rather than the jarring segments we had in episodes 1-3. And we finally got some levity and an insight into Fett's character. The dry humour worked a treat, nicely offsetting his otherwise serious demeanor ("Don't touch my buttons," "It was worth a shot"). There was much better chemistry between characters, which I found stilted and wooden in previous episodes. And even though it was pure fan service, I loved the way they visually explained the Sarlaac's notorious SE beak, complete with a seismic charge to destroy it (one could interpret some commentary there, if they desired). Kudos to Skywalker Sound for some excellent sound design across the whole episode, also Legacy Effects for all the robotics and creature effects (loved the chef robot impersonating General Grievous with cooking utensils, and the fact the robots had such uniquely jerky movements, great puppeteering!). This was a real showcase episode for their work. This episode probably had the best overall music too, maybe except that electronic/disco source cue in the mod parlor (not quite otherworldly enough for my liking; felt like a very pale imitation of Zion from Matrix Reloaded).
    4 points
  31. This, to me, is the million dollar question. Thor's entire raison d'être hangs on the answer!
    4 points
  32. That's an astonishingly anti-Powell sentiment from Luke. Solo, HTTYD and CotW are all recent Powell scores with rich orchestra and thematic writing. To call them 'forgetable powell synth rythms' stinks of Williams snobbery.
    3 points
  33. Sad to say I largely agree. I'll continue watching; each episode has had at least one or two elements I like. But I can't really reconcile the Boba in this show with the one in the OT. Or AOTC, for that matter. In a weird way, even though this show is indeed running on the fumes of The Mandalorian, it's also kind of at a disadvantage as a result. Mando is initially characterized exactly as you might expect Boba to be: a focused, efficient, faceless, not-too-talkative badass who gets the job done so he can get paid. Obviously a big part of that show is his development beyond being a proxy for Boba Fett. So...what do you do with a show that's actually about the real Boba? It would have been more gutsy to have his sarlacc experience harden him into a truly fearsome baddie. But I don't know where that would have gone.
    3 points
  34. "You won't wake up in the dark ever again to that awful screaming of the lambs." Silence of the Lambs Finally got the time to rewatch this absolute masterpiece. Everything is terrific from the script to the actors, from the direction to the cinematography, to the haunting but subtil score of Howard Shore. Simply one of the best movie ever made.
    3 points
  35. I honestly and truly don't see the point of listening to this and pondering on how it compares to other music written for the same character in the past Giacchino wasn't hired to composer a theme that embodies the entire 80whatever years of the character Giacchino was hired to give Matt Reeves the score he wanted for this particular film I think it makes sense to compare what Giacchino is doing against what everyone is doing scoring superhero films of the 2020s And it makes sense to compare what Giachino is doing against his own body of work But I don't see the point in comparing it to older themes written for the same character in other places
    3 points
  36. They should just announce it if there's something to announce. The teases are only annoying.
    3 points
  37. They teased the crossover when they played his twangy dissonance, which led Boba to find Fennec. This aligns Boba's flashback timeline with S1 of The Mandalorian. Strange that Fennec "died" within walking distance of Jabba's palace, but Mando had no business with Bib at the time. She's more machine now than woman, compassionate and fair... They repeated the tone at the end when Fennec mentions muscle. At that point, they are in the "present" timeline that occurs after Mandalorian S2. They know about the Mandalorians on other worlds that could help. I agree that nothing in Episodes 1-3 suggest a lengthy passage of time for Boba to stay with the Tuskens. His skin damage? The twin suns and dehydration would cause that with no clear number for calibration. Maybe if a child or potted plant grew up, it would illustrate the point. Surprised that after five years, Boba would forget where he put his armor. Did he forget he climbed out of the Sarlacc wearing it? He crawled away, passed out, and then he was robbed. Why would the armor be back inside the Sarlacc? I loved the opportunity to destroy the vile beak once and for all. It is possible that action left the empty Sarlacc pit where the Krayt camped out in S2 of the Mandalorian, but that would restrict our action to a small corner of Tatooine. Too convenient. The sounds as the mine rolled into its maw were reminiscent of the whale probe from Star Trek 4. What do Banthas eat? Meat, really? Maybe as a treat. Vast herds of shaggy horned pachyderms on a desert planet eat meat... Sand maybe? Ridiculous. I don't really mind that Boba calls his ship the Firespray. Disney cannot market its true name: Slave 1. It's not a good word anymore. I am glad that we FINALLY got to see a Wookiee pull an arm out of someone's socket.
    3 points
  38. The single release sounds like two cues smashed together. One from 0:00-3:59 and one from 3:59-end The one from 0:00-3:59 seems to cover a few different ideas, none particularly memorable. The one from 3:59-end is the theme from all the trailers. I was hoping the trailers only used the build-up and on album it'd continue into something exciting but... it doesn't. As always, I look forward to hearing the entire score album before casting any judgement on the score, but the single leaves me unimpressed.
    3 points
  39. Track 1, 19 and 21 are not alternates. They are taken from the concert suite as recorded for the Music for Stage and Screen 1990 Sony Classical album.
    3 points
  40. It's increasingly clear that this show could (should?) have told its story in a straightforward chronological order, but because it wanted to end Mando S2 with that post-credits teaser of Boba sitting on Jabba's throne, they felt they had to start the series there. This series could have been announced without that teaser, told in a chronological order starting with the sarlacc escape and have him seize the throne halfway through or whatever and we would have figured out how the timeline matched up with Mando as it went. All that said, I'm still basically enjoying spending time in this series. It's nothing amazing, but I like the world and the characters. I'm having a good time.
    3 points
  41. The Book of Boba Fett 1x03 The Streets of Mos Espa I realized I forgot to share my thoughts. As someone who thought the first episode was kinda boring and episode 2 was GREAT, I though this episode was... OK I was kinda surprised the flashback portion was both so short, and that they just killed off all the Tuskens. Like from an entire season perspective, it makes sense that these guys that saved and trained him would get fridged, happens all the time in these stories. But I was just kinda surprised after spending so much time with them over 2 episodes, in this episode they are quickly killed off screen. Nice music cue, though In the main timeline, I enjoyed Matt Berry breaking down the city for Boba, explaining what's what, etc - I feel like this should have happened sooner! When Stephen Root showed up, I was super thrilled - loved that guy since Newsradio, and had no idea he was on this show. Unfortunately I thought his story made no sense, or maybe was badly executed? Like his dialogue with Fett felt stilted and weird, and then later when Boba confronts the cyborg crew, the way he runs out of some door to join the scene was strange. I dunno, it all just felt off and weird. The cyborgs themselves also didn't really work for me. I love the idea of a bunch of scrappy young kids doing what they want in a poor part of the world, but their tech seemed to neat and clean, and their bikes were ESPECIALLY WAY TOO neat and clean. Like this is the dirty desert, why was all their stuff colorful and shiny? More bad execution. On the other hand, Fett getting attacked by the Wookiee and the subsequent fight was pretty great! It was kind of strange that right afterward, the Hutts show up and both take responsibility for everything that's happened, and also say they are leaving because the mayor promised everything to a syndicate. For some reason I thought of the syndicate Emilia Clarke works for in Solo, but I guess it's probably just the same guys that killed Boba's Tuskens in the flashbacks? I dunno, I feel like things are a little needlessly complicated. The last chase scene trying to get the mayor was the poorest execution of an idea in the show yet, what more needs to be said. So when he reveals the mayor has promised everything to the Pykes, and those are the same guys that they robbed the train of in the flashback storyline, does that mean they've already been on the planet, for 5 years now just waiting to gain power after Jabba died? Why didn't they obtain it right away? I feel like I shouldn't be this lost. Maybe the next episode will make all this make sense
    3 points
  42. "Recollections" removes CMIYC from contention
    3 points
  43. Always thought that cue sounded like Thomas Newman’s “Floor Washing” cue from Oscar and Lucinda. Perhaps a little temp track bled through? (Cant seem to find that track on YouTube otherwise I’d post it. But it’s pretty similar- JWs is just a bit slower…)
    3 points
  44. I opened up my copy today and listened to it for the first time. I wasn't expecting such a disjointed experience; It's more like a collection of different ideas than a traditional narrative film score. It's so short, too, I just put it on again after it was over and am listening for a third time as I type this. The funniest tracks are definitely Shopping Sauce 2 and 3, which sound like a porno The most Powell-y tracks are definitely the two original demos tracks, and the few main program tracks that user their ideas. And it's not that the rest of the tracks are bad, just not what I've come to expect from a Powell score. Overall though, I like this album, its a fun way to spend 27 1/2 minutes! The liner notes to this release are among the most interesting and unique I've ever read! It's simply a back and forth conversation with Kaya Savas and Powell from June of 2020, and Powell is brutally open and honest about everything. He talks about how the film's director had temp-tracked the entire movie with pop songs, and how he basically had to compete to be heard, with him sometimes writing a sound-a-alike to a temp song (ie A Propellerheads song), and then them sticking with the song anyway and not using his cue, and other stuff he wrote being used more than once, etc. They talk about romantic comedy scoring and how often filmmakers don't really care about lietmotif or melody, just mood and atmosphere. They also go off on a tangent about white privilege, with Powell reflecting on the benefits he received as a white male starting a film composing career, and the general impact of white privilege on modern society. And Powell is really hard on his own work, talking about what he'd do different today and such. The interview also explains why the album is shorter than the old leak/promo, because some of the ideas he wrote that didn't get used, he ended up re-using for future scores, so as a result cannot include those demos on this official release. Overall, this is I think a must-have album for any big Powell fan, for not just the musical content but also the really interesting and illuminating interview. It goes in so many directions, it doesn't only talk about Forces of Nature, there's talk of Bourne, Mr and Mrs Smith, and other scores too. You can't beat the $16 price tag
    3 points
  45. Nixon is easily my most wanted expansion after Hook. I predict it is going to be even more illuminating than Eiger. The original album is excellent but when the full opera is revealed, I think mostly all of us are going to be doubly impressed.
    3 points
  46. I was shocked and disappointed when I saw Azkaban LTP how many people in the audience just got up and started walking out as soon as the credits started, chattering away over the orchestra like it was a movie theater. It's not like the lights came on or anything, people were just fumbling around in the dark. It's one thing to be more used to casual concert etiquette where you can socialize during the performance but to get up and leave while they're playing, that's some shit. It's really disrespectful, they should make an announcement at the beginning or something to please stay seated. The Mugglenet site did post a review with a giveaway contest but seems that's the only mention of it. Snitchseeker also tweeted this with a link to their article, reposting the LLL press release. Honestly, though, I suspect there could have easily been confusion from fans around whether these were just the original soundtracks being re-boxed for a "cash grab". It's true that it doesn't seem like anybody paid much attention to it overall. I think a lot of even hardcore fans possibly wouldn't be able to think of more than one or two things they liked that they would have wanted to hear on the soundtracks, and not enough to shell out $100 for it. It's why these things are limited but I hope the people who put all the hard work into these things feel appreciated. It's such a special market to have out there even if I myself don't often purchase them either!
    3 points
  47. The multiple iterations of the Scherzo for Motorcycle & Orchestra is an interesting case, isn't it? I'm not convinced the piece is improved either, though I can kind of understand Williams's thought process in implementing them. This'll probably of limited use if you're not fluent with stem & slur analytical notation, but I did a little graph of the piece for an article that shows how the Scherzo's tonal plan is (and is not) affected by all these various changes.
    3 points
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