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Showing content with the highest reputation on 02/01/23 in all areas

  1. Folks, Happy New Year! If you have not had the chance to listen to the new episode of The Baton featuring a discussion of the score to The Fabelmans, you can watch it in the player below. It was fun returning to the show after a two-year hiatus. Also, I'm also starting a new podcast that will take us through the first 90 years of the Academy Award for Best Original Song. That podcast, called The Best Song Podcast, will mention John Williams at various points when he earns Oscar nominations for songwriting. Until then, I hope you'll enjoy the episodes, which will be found at this website and on the Podbean app beginning tomorrow (January 2) until it's approved for other podcast platforms.
    7 points
  2. What you said @Taikomochi 😃 I wish I could articulate my appreciation for this score as well as you just did. There are so many little moments that stand out on each listen and grow into earworms. For example, that mournful trumpet statement of the danger motif in the middle of Eclipse. Or the triumphal choir and orchestra blast of the Songcord motif in Bad Parents. Or the twinkly watery synths in the various cues associated with, well, water. I think what distinguishes Franglen's action writing despite it's modernity is the way he integrates the higher registers in a way that creates interest and complements the bassy rythmic elements and string ostinatos. It's way more thoughtful and musically involving than the standard Zimmeresque Bwaam thump-and-grate-the-audience-into-submission-ad-nauseum.
    5 points
  3. Happy New Year everyone!! We are starting off 2023 strong with an unfortunate house elf funeral, and by giving Voldemort the upper hand. Enjoy Cue No. 31: A Free Elf and Cue No. 32: The Elder Wand! We've had so much fun on this score and have really enjoyed hearing from you along the way. As usual, we will post the concert works/end credits/complete score and extras in the coming weeks! MS & BP
    5 points
  4. LA LA LAND RECORDS Announces: CHAPLIN: 30TH ANNIVERSARY EXPANDED EDITION Music Composed and Conducted by John Barry Limited Edition of 3000 Units Release Date Jan 13th, 2023
    4 points
  5. Indeed, this is an incredible score, perhaps my favorite of the decade so far. Beyond the score being a loving tribute to Horner, I’m just astounded at how well the themes are developed, all the smaller ideas like Payakan’s theme from its ethereal introduction to its badass rendition closing “A Farewell to Arm”, but especially the family theme. Just admire how Franglen gives it such a cathartic statement in the middle of “Bad Parents” before closing out the piece with a warped version of the same theme. And then just a short while later, he transforms it again in the transcendent “From Darkness to Light”. I’m having a difficult time remembering the last time I heard a new score that was this narratively satisfying. This is a major work of film music composition, pure and simple.
    4 points
  6. Oh man, I'm really loving this score. The shorter album has been a repeat listen on a nearly daily basis, and for me that's huge. I can't remember the last time I listened to a score constantly like this. Franglen knocked it out of the park. I haven't cried listening to a film score (specifically the tracks From Darkness to Light and The Spirit Tree) since the day Horner passed and I played the End Credits from Glory. I'm seeing the film again tomorrow for the 2nd time and can't wait to experience the score in context again.
    4 points
  7. Yes, that literally is what happened, point for point.
    4 points
  8. A quick OST breakdown: 01 Main Title (The Godfather Waltz) D1T1 Main Title, Corleone Waltz #1 0:00-0:38 (so just the Main Title part) D1T30 Main Title (alternate) D1T23 Too Little Time 02 I Have But One Heart 03 The Pickup D1T13 The Pickup (extended version) 0:00-2:56 (faded out early) 04 Connie's Wedding A different partial take and mix of D2T14 The Godfather Tarantella A different partial take and mix of D2T15 The Godfather Mazurka background noise/dialogue over it, removed in D2T19 Connie's Wedding (Music Only) 05 The Halls of Fear D1T1 Main Title, Corleone Waltz #1 0:00-0:38 (so just the Main Title part) D1T9 The Halls of Fear (Extended version) 1:01-1:39 D1T9 The Halls of Fear (Extended version) 3:01-3:55 (faded out early) 06 Sicilian Pastorale D1T15 Sicilian Pastorale 07 Love Theme from The Godfather Love Theme from The Godfather (Film Version) (with added percussion and choir) An ending extension for guitar/mandolin? and choir 08 The Godfather Waltz D1T1 Main Title, Corleone Waltz #1 0:00-0:38 (so just the Main Title part) D1T27 Corleone Waltz #3 D1T1 Main Title, Corleone Waltz #1 0:38-1:20 (so just the Corleone Waltz #1 part) D1T17 Corleone Waltz #2 (faded out early) 09 Apollonia D1T18 Apollonia 10 The New Godfather D1T21 Marry Me, Kay D1T26 The New Godfather (Film Version) 11 The Baptism D1T24 The Baptism (Extended Version) 3:07-4:58 (faded out early) 12 The Godfather Finale A third take of End Credits, with the structure following D1T36 End Credits (alternate) (with the big love theme statement in the middle not edited out), but with added choir and accordion.
    4 points
  9. I too would like to reiterate my love for this score. I keep discovering new things and new statements of themes, it's just a joy to listen to. I haven't been this emotionally moved by a score when watching a film like this in years. The entire 'From Darkness to Light' scene in the film is breathtaking in every way; the drama of the scene, the imagery of Eywa's light, the confidence and power of Kiri. It's all told with the score, which takes center stage to make it all so special to watch.
    3 points
  10. This is exhausting. And I'm scrolling past most of it.
    3 points
  11. Same. I might pick up Chaplin while I'm at it; hard to go wrong with John Barry.
    3 points
  12. Finally got my FIDDLER and CONAN on the last sunset of 2022
    3 points
  13. I am so glad you finally were able to get around to doing this, Thor. I was finally able to listen to part one and there is a lot of great music that I had not heard in my research for my own podcast. I hope you're able to uncover more hidden gems!
    3 points
  14. Next in my series is another JW masterpiece, based on LLL's wonderful new expansion, which revealed lots of previously unknown unused tracks, alternates, and filled in major gaps in the soundtrack album as well as restoring the proper order of cues revealing a structure of a wide range of seemingly disconnected musical elements converging and coming together satisfyingly, mirroring the movie's theme of distant cultures growing to understand each other. As usual I will explain the cues' film usage where it's fitting. The spotting is certainly not wall to wall, though since I didn't restore even the source music found on the LLL set, let alone all the "needledrop" recordings used in the film, it's a tiny bit misleading if we'd want to look at purely music, not score: The state court scenes are mostly left unscored, but nearly all of the final 40 minutes are scored all the way through. Starting with this project, I'm doing something some previous ones like Presumed Innocent could've benefited from: burning subtitles into the video to help with cues for dialogue-heavy scenes where the sync points aren't necessarily for shot changes or physical actions but for a specific line that changes the tone or topic, of which there are several in this movie. Syncing up cues helped me appreciate many cues in a new light or a deeper way - like Discovering the Bible, really seeing how the initially 2 disparate textures start melding and come together by the end; or Adams' Address to the Court, where I was initially confused by the usage of obvious synth voices in this fantastically varied choir-heavy score - the first one scores Isabella's complaint letters about American courts, probably illustrating her "unnatural" views of courts as mechanical toys to play with, to do as she says, instead of idealistic independent entities, the second, darker one scoring Adams reading aloud the article about how slavery is the natural order of things, hopefully no need here to describe why the usage of "unnatural" synth voices instead of a real choir could be appropriate. Thanks to @Jay for helping with the selection and answering some background information questions! Introduction is actually a wild vocal take the music people used here, but I included it because why not. Retribution is fully unused, and to be honest I can see why, even if it's a great piece. If synced up to the final film footage (the opening may have been extended), the percussion and flute scores Cinque's struggle as it's starting to bear fruit, the male choir scores him lifting the nail, the choral Cinque's theme scores his newfound chance, and things start to escalate as he frees himself. The rhythm kicks up as the captain picks up his musket and Cinque approaches him, then it fades out when the new captain removes his Excalibur from the old captain's body like he removed the nail. I removed the second wild humming take that's included in the film and LLL since it would overlap with the next cue, July 4, 1839, which is mostly unused. The dark soundscape scoring the uncertainty (unused) temporarily clears up as the helmsman states he'll head for Africa. JW's emotional shot-specific scoring for the night scene was replaced by a choral take of Cinque's theme, dropping the twinkles for the stars, its descending variant scoring the turn, and the Seven Years in Tibet/RotS strings with added choir scoring Cinque desperately taking over and correcting the course himself. Steering East is again unused, and in my opinion should be here where the title doesn't describe it very well, for the scene of the new crew landing on what they think are African shores, gathering water and coming across a man on a proto-bicycle. (For an alternate sync idea that might actually work better, see this post.) The Capture is mostly used, only a small portion was edited out when the ship lands (the film was edited down a bit at this point too), and the ending was replaced with one of the wild solo humming takes, removing the only musical representation of the Queen of Spain coming from JW, since the rest of her scenes contain source music at most. Introducing John Quincy Adams is used as is. Meeting of the Minds is a strange case - it's more like semi-wild mood music than specific scoring adhering to sync points, and it runs longer than the scene, where it's only partially used. Counsel Meets Client, The Ship Remembers, Visiting Adams and What Is Their Story? again are used as is, but Learning To Count is the same case as Meeting of the Minds - not really specific and runs a lot longer than its scene. Tale of the Lion's Tooth is used as is. The Capture of Cinque and The Crossing are complicated - for this video I had to shorten the storm/birthing scene and entirely remove the feeding scene between the suicide/lashing and the mass drowning scenes. In the film, parts of Capture of Cinque are looped over these and other parts of the same track, and even mostly in place of or over The Crossing - only the opening minute and the Spanish guitar part remains from it, edited, then the ending's replaced by solo humming again. Tales of Horror remains untouched except for a percussion overlay coming from The Ship Remembers (if you don't count that the original take's ending was replaced by the second revision, replicated here instead of sticking with the LLL edit), same with Discovering the Bible. After a long unscored section, including the victory on state level, The Letter to Massachusetts and Cinque's Legal Mind are used as is. The footage for African Violet had to be edited very slightly. Adams' Address to the Court and Adams' Summation are used as is. The Verdict is edited slightly in the film. Liberation of Lomboko is used as is, Going Home starts with the choir only mix, the soloist only comes in starting with the Civil War shots. The film starts the credits with a third solo humming take, then used Dry Your Tears, Afrika as is on the LLL, with more obvious Lomboko tracking edit points and the ending cut short - if we use only it and The Long Road to Justice like I did here, they fit the credits' length well. The Capture (alternate) is basically a different mix of the main program version. The Ship Remembers (alternate) is a slightly different take with different percussion overlay usage. What Is Their Story (alternate) is the original take, featuring another Adams rendition in place of the revision's DYTA. The Crossing (alternate) was written for an even shorter cut, I couldn't really come up with a good way to edit it down. Tales of Horror had an original take with Cinque's theme scoring his outburst, more as a low moment where he can't hold in his despair any longer - I had to shorten this footage for this original ending. The first revision doubles down on this idea and utilises the longer edit to add in another statement that helps the theme climax, still scoring Cinque's despair. The second revision, ultimately used in the film, takes the first revision's structure but pulls Dry Your Tears, Afrika onto it, making it a moment of uplifting triumph, where Cinque stands up for himself and demands the justice he'll ultimately receive. The third revision keeps the DYTA idea, but tones it down significantly, more as a quiet release than a triumphant climax. Discovering the Bible (alternate) is a different original approach - while the revised film version starts with representing the Africans with percussion, the Bible discussion with harp and Cinque on flute, and the church scenes with semi-religioso strings and brass, and eventually starts melding them, moving Cinque to different instruments and stops changing styles with the latter back and forth cuts, this version represents the Africans with sad strings (probably coming off of one of the Cinque versions of Tales of Horror), the Bible scenes, while still prominent in harp, are also scored with strings and multiple kinds of woodwinds while the church is mostly brass-based - they still meld but the cutting back and forth is not so obvious. I had to extend the ending a bit so Cinque's theme entering would sync up with the cut back to the jail. Cinque's Memories of Home, a revision of Cinque's Legal Mind, sets the "communication" theme on cello, solo vocal humming and percussion - IMO moving the material a bit too far to the east from the US, possibly why it wasn't used. Going Home (alternate) is the choir take without the solo vocal, as it is partially used in the film. And finally, an idea by @BrotherSound: Cinque's Theme (solo flute) is also 2:06 long, like Going Home, why not try to see if it fits. In my opinion, it kind of does, many of the percussion hits and phrase borders match with shot changes.
    2 points
  15. So this is one hell of a coverup. Never have so many people reported mishaps and changes in directions to hide the fact that THEY KNEW WHAT THEY WERE DOING ALL ALONG.
    2 points
  16. MV says Chaplin was supposed to a Black Friday title but wasn't going to be in on time so BURBS filled it's slot. FRIDAY THE 13TH PT 2 ULTIMATE is even more impressive than the Ultimate Part 1 we did in 2021. We think fans will be very happy. HAPPY NEW YEAR, Y'ALL! MV https://filmscoremonthly.com/board/posts.cfm?threadID=150116&forumID=1&archive=0
    2 points
  17. Looking forward to the inevitable Saturday the 14th spin-off.
    2 points
  18. Fargo

    Star Wars Disenchantment

    Please let this thread dieee
    2 points
  19. I would say it's obvious, but having run into quite a few Snyder cultists myself in the past, it probably would be hard to tell without the (/s).
    2 points
  20. Chaplin’s supposed to include a lot of never before heard music which went unused in the film, according to Jon Burlingame on Facebook. I’m in! Yavar
    2 points
  21. Movies: Highly Anticipated Dune Part 2 - Should be bigger and better than the first in every way. Creed III - Love the first two and I am a sucker for boxing/MMA films as I follow the sports. Jonathan Majors looks to be a breakout star. Oppenheimer - Always a huge Nolan fan and the trailer sold me. Mission: Impossible - Dead Reckoning Part 1 - The best of its genre. Always enjoy the next installment. Movies: Somewhat Anticipated Cocaine Bear - The real life story is just too bizarre for me not to raise my eyebrows. Elemental - I like Pixar when they are not making sequels and coming up with original ideas. Killers of the Flower Moon - Nobody brings the best out of actors like Scorsese. John Wick: Chapter 4 - Enjoyed the first 3 and the trailer looks great. A Haunting in Venice - Good mysteries are hard to come by and I enjoyed the first two films. Napoleon - Ridley Scott is ultimate hit and miss director, and I am hoping this is a massive hit. Blue Beetle - Never heard of this superhero so I am intrigued. Maestro - Biopic of Leonard Bernstein. Can't be that bad right? The Killer - Fincher and Assassin. I am probably in. Ferrari - Michael Mann's return to greatness? Kraven the Hunter - I can go either way on this but I like the character and the potential for a darker superhero film Equalizer 3 - Because I want to listen to Denzel speak for 5 straight minutes in the most compelling/badass way Movies: I will probably watch at some point, but not anticipating anything M3GAN Fast X Indiana Jones and the Dial of Destiny The Marvels Ant-Man and the Wasps: Quantumania Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 3 Shazam! Fury of the Gods Spider-Man: Across the Spider-Verse Aquaman and the Lost Kingdom The Flash Movies: I will watch if word of mouth or reviews are great Knock at the Cabin Scream 6 Dungeons & Dragons: Honor Among Thieves The Hunger Games: The Ballad of Songbirds & Snakes The Little Mermaid Asteroid City Chevalier Next Goal Wins The Color Purple The Super Mario Bros. Movie TV Shows: New The Last of Us (HBO) - I love the games. Can't wait for this faithful adaption. The Three Body Problem (Netlfix) - Serious sci-fi with aliens. Yep... All the Light We Cannot See (Netflix) - Acclaimed novel. I am sucker for a good TV drama. Shogun (Hulu) - Rise of Japanese shoguns...how can I not be interested? The Last Thing he Told me (AppleTV) - Again, slow burn dramas are my thing. TV Shows: Returning Seasons Black Mirror: Season 6 (Netflix) - My favorite What-If show ever Shadow and Bone: Season 2 (Netlfix) - One of the few fantasy shows I got into Succession: Season 4 (HBO) - Definitely my favorite drama on TV Warrior: Season 3 (HBO) - Definitely my favorite action series on TV. It is Game of Thrones with the Chinese and Irish. Tokyo Vice: Season 2 (HBO) - One of the kind thriller/mystery in a foreign land True Detectives: Night Country (HBO) - The past 2 seasons didn't live up to the first season, but the acting in this series is just superb. Severance (AppleTV) - Rarely do you see a concept idea being executed so well. For all Mankind (AppleTV) - Space exploration has never been more dramatic Reacher: Season 2 (Amazon Prime) - When you just want action, humor, and sex.
    1 point
  22. I'm really only looking forward to Indy V for the score. Nothing else really grabs me but I'll give M:I a watch on Blu-ray eventually. The MCU lost me with Phase IV (with the exception of S-M: FFH).
    1 point
  23. Sharky no like cutesy synth barking poodle sounds in his scores?
    1 point
  24. Well we wrapped up Pirates of the Caribbean: At World's End on New Years Eve. This is my favorite Zimmer score, hands down. The Wedding is probably my favorite Zimmer track. As the saying goes "They don't score movies like this anymore." I'm sure every time a movie scores music to picture this specifically and this broadly the composer could be accused of being "tongue in cheek" or "winking at the audience". This goes back to Star Wars, and probably further. And yet it always such a crowd pleaser. Are we just that dumb, or are composers not as smart as they think they are? As I mentioned before I love how almost all of the balls thrown in the air (or the things that they decided to retroactively make into balls thrown in the air from the first movie) almost all land. I take a weird delight in knowing (and pointing out) that Norrington's sword that Will made in the first movie changes hands through the film until it ends up killing Will. It would be nice to see the four hour version of this movie that resolves what happened with Becket and Jack and Jack and Davy Jones and maybe tells us what Governor Swan's death was supposed to mean. Admiral Norrington's story is badly handled. He's a stooge here and he never was in either of the other films. He's actually smart because that makes Jack look smarter. Not here. Here he seems bewildered by Becket which is very out of step from where we left him in the last film. Back in the plus column, the story of Tia Dalma / Calypso feels organic and earned. It isn't telegraphed in P2 even though there is certainly foreshadowing. And it doesn't just feel bolted on here. It's one of those mysteries that is obvious enough to make sense but enough of a surprise to be satisfying. Even if you figure it out ahead of time, it's satisfying when you do. It doesn't feel like you're cheated of the big reveal. And Naomie Harris is delightful. Her and Nighy manage to make the story almost tragic. The re-introduction of all of the characters at the start of the film is masterful. The only sequel that comes close to giving everyone a Big Entrance to almost every character that is even close is Return of the Jedi. I was surprised at how happy I was to see Pintel and Ragetti since I wasn't that fond of them in the first film. But they were much better used in the second. Speaking of Master Ragetti: I love what they figured out what to do with this character in this and the last film. He becomes The Man with the Answers. When he steps up and tells Barbossa "You're doing it wrong" is one of the high moments of the film for me and certainly for the character. The only series I can think of that stuck its landing this well is the MCU with Endgame. Maybe Back to the Future? Sadly not Star Wars. This was time well spent. Drink up, me hearties! Yo ho!
    1 point
  25. I've always wondered: is there any significance in "66", or is it just a random number?
    1 point
  26. Chen G.

    Star Wars Disenchantment

    Unless one is drunk. Then it’s a hoot! oh for crying out loud, at least have a sense of self-humour!
    1 point
  27. Chen G.

    Star Wars Disenchantment

    I strongly advise people not be admitted to this thread sober. The best way to enjoy Mattris’ ravings is with copious amounts of booze.
    1 point
  28. The Meg - Jason Statham vs a giant prehistoric shark, basically. Like one of those cheapo B-movie creature features that used to litter the SyFy/Horror Channel schedules, but with a bigger budget and better cast. It made for a pleasantly undemanding way to pass a New Year's Day afternoon as I continued to recover from the previous night's drunken excesses.
    1 point
  29. Framed #297 🎥 🟥 🟩 ⬛ ⬛ ⬛ ⬛ https://framed.wtf boxofficega.me March 25, 1994 ✅ 160 ✅ 160 ✅ 120 ✅ 200 ❌ 0 🏆 640 #DailyTomato 🍅 Jan-02 🟡⚪⚪⚪⚪ Wordle 562 4/6* ⬜⬜⬜🟨🟩 🟩⬜⬜🟩🟩 🟩⬜🟩🟩🟩 🟩🟩🟩🟩🟩 What's the website for that one? I’ll add it to my lineup to post every day
    1 point
  30. "Where they align leaves open room for where they don't. That is, of course, very different from employing the phrase "only what is identical" which the statement does not imply.
    1 point
  31. I don't know why Colin Trevorrow's script was rejected. It couldn't have been as bad as TROS. I love Mattris's theory that his script was a decoy and totally fake. Like LFL would pay someone to write a fake script. 😄😄😄🙄
    1 point
  32. ?? No it doesn't. That isn't what the tweet says. Read it again. It says the novelizations are canon "where they align with what is seen on screen". If it does not 'align what what is seen on screen', it is not canon And, you are asking him to prove something does not exist? How is he meant to do that? Would you like to see a piece of plain white paper? Who needs to be convinced something unknown, immeasurable, nonexistent, undetectable exists Saying 'the proof is in the pudding' does not advance your argument
    1 point
  33. @Holko, this looks great! I hope I can find time to watch this all real soon!
    1 point
  34. No, it doesn't. Because it wasn't. We all know it wasn't. If you have proof we are all wrong and you're right please provide it. Otherwise you have no credibility.
    1 point
  35. The dissonant strings in 'A New Star' are so effective in that scene as the ships descend. My small local art-house cinema showed the film, which was a nice surprise, and they have basically the perfect cinema, with amazingly comfortable sofa-like chairs and a small 50 seat room with a screen that, although still large, seems like a home cinema. The sound system is the best I've ever experienced, and my seat was vibrating with the sheer force of the bass in that scene as the ships' massive thrusters fire. Incredible moment with Franglen's apocalyptic score accompanying it.
    1 point
  36. Not really sure. It's very English, if that helps. Very pastoral.
    1 point
  37. I love Bad Batch and I'm very excited for the new season (even though it means the end of my vacation). Clone Wars is, like you said, very much all over the board. The last four episodes of the Clone Wars are truly next level and the best thing from the Prequel era by a goodly margin. But Rebels is where my heart is.
    1 point
  38. C’mon, his peak at least started in the 70s… Jane Eyre, his first Oscar win for Fiddler on the Roof, The Cowboys, Images, JAWS (and its first sequel), Close Encounters, The Fury for DePalma, Family Plot for Hitchcock, SUPERMAN, a little film called STAR WARS??? What’s this 1954 film score you’re referring to? Was it a student film or something he did for the Air Force? Because his first Hollywood film score was Daddy-O in 1958… And while I’ve got my pedantic professor hat on… Anyone who regards it as such is being ignorant; anyone who declares it as such is either that or dishonest. King Kong in complete form is a little over 70 minutes long. And it’s not even “wall to wall” because the film has almost half an hour without music. Check out this great podcast episode for interesting commentary on that: https://www.settlingthescorepodcast.com/14-king-kong/ In the previous decade composers such as Gottfried Huppertz (Metropolis, Die Nibelungen) were composing even larger scale and more wall to wall orchestral film scores of much greater sophistication and complexity than what Steiner did for King Kong (or similarly for the same creative team the previous year for The Most Dangerous Game, for that matter!) (2.5 hours!!) (4.5 hours! It was an epic two-part film, but still…) Hell, the very first original orchestral film score by Camille Saint-Saens way back in 1908 was virtually wall to wall itself! (It’s just that the film was only about 20 minutes long.) (Start on Track 5.) My favorite French film score from the 20s is Salammbo by Florent Schmitt: (This isn’t even the complete score, but three suites from it cut down for concert performance purposes.) None other that Doug Adams (The Music of the Lord of the Rings Films) is another champion of this one: https://florentschmitt.com/2014/06/12/film-music-specialist-doug-adams-talks-about-florent-schmitts-salammbo-and-other-music-scores-from-the-silent-film-era/amp/ And it’s not just the French and Germans. Dmitri Shostakovich started writing long form film music in Russia during the 1920s. His score to Odna was years before King Kong, was long form, played with diegetic and non-diegetic, and even was the first film score to feature the theremin, many years before Rozsa or Herrmann used it! (79 minutes long) Then we have Spanish composer Ernesto Halffter (Carmen, 1926): (66 min long) Finnish composer Armas Jarnefelt with the very first original orchestral film score written in Finland (just 11 years after Saint-Saens’s sole film score): (99 minutes long!) Italian composer Pietro Mascagni’s score for Rapsodia Satanica (he’s best known for the opera Cavalleria Rusticana but he did this one film score in 1917): “But Yavar! Max Steiner was the first person to write full length orchestral scores in HOLLYWOOD!” Nope! None other than La-La Land Records released a restoration of the Zamecnik score to Wings (1927) years ago — 76.5 minutes, longer than King Kong: https://lalalandrecords.com/wings-limited-edition/ And he’s not the first in the United States either! That might(?) have been for the odious (but historically important) Birth of a Nation (1913), with original orchestral score composed by Joseph Carl Breil: https://moviemusicuk.us/2022/01/10/the-birth-of-a-nation-joseph-carl-breil/ And for Spotify users, we have this new (released earlier this year!) Mark Fitz-Gerald-conducted recording of The Thief of Bagdad — no, not the well remembered 1940 version by Miklos Rozsa, but one by American composer Mortimer Wilson for the 1924 Hollywood version starring Douglas Fairbanks… 74 minutes on album, also more substantial than King Kong which it pre-dated by nine years: Wilson was something of a film music specialist all through the 1920s in Hollywood, by the way… at least a half dozen film scores starting with 1920’s The Mark of Zorro and going through 1928’s The Good-bye Kiss and The Night Watch. So yeah, while the 1933 film King Kong was the first Hollwood film to achieve *that* level of popularity, and therefore Steiner’s lengthy (but not unprecedentedly so) orchestral score has gotten a lot of press and attention over the years… NO, it wasn’t “first”… by any meaningful metric. Yavar
    1 point
  39. Why did you type different text into your quote of my post, than what exists in my actual post?
    1 point
  40. As promised, we have two cues totalling 13 minutes of music today! They also create the climactic scene at the end of Deathly Hallows Part 1. We hope you enjoy the action music and some theme callbacks in Cue No. 29: Chase Through the Forest and Cue No. 30: Malfoy Manor! We'll be back with the last 2 cues after Christmas! MS & BP
    1 point
  41. Well, I wouldn't call 60 years a slight difference... One important factor is probably whether these albums were part of your introduction to film music. For me, one of them were (listened to it a lot when it came out, but didn't own it): Schindler's List: The Classic Film Music Of John Williams. It contains several good performances, especially the piano version of the SL theme, but it probably contains just as many performances that I wasn't happy with. Still, I should probably track down a copy for sentimentality's sake.
    1 point
  42. A vastly underrated gem, in the master's oeuvre.
    1 point
  43. The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles (every episode) I don't have any grails left from any other non-JW composers. Field of Dreams and that 4 CD of Robin Hood Prince of Thieves pretty much completed those grail quests. Nevermind @Edmilsonreminded me of King Kong by JNH. that's my last non-JW grail
    1 point
  44. Not my favorite either, but I really appreciate they way Matessino put both scores into the context of a transition time for Williams “digging deeper” (particularly with PI) to move from the heroic mid 80s sound to the more “mature” 90s writing. It’s fascinating to consider a film like Presumed Innocent and consider how he might’ve scored it if it were made two decades later, given the complexity of his writing after scoring more diverse projects than SW and 80s Amblin style work. I see it as a transitionary piece. Maybe not necessarily the most exciting on its own, but in context of career, very interesting. Of course a nice shiny new MM expansion may completely change my perception of it. In fact, I welcome that and am counting on it.
    1 point
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